Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "manipulation" ...

  • Tracking the Manipulation of Public Opinion in the Presidential Campaign

    This is a series of investigative reports on the reality of online media manipulation during the 18th Presidential Campaign in South Korea in 2012, dubbed as the first social media election of the country. The reports employ a scientific census of 900 million tweets as part of the investigation.
  • Hacking Democracy

    NBC News broke a series of exclusive stories about the U.S. government assessment that Russian intelligence had mounted a covert operation to interfere in the American presidential election, and about efforts to prevent manipulation of the vote itself. http://qlnk.io/ql/58753f16e4b036c5d233fddc http://www.nbcnews.com/nightly-news/video/sources-intel-has-drawn-direct-links-to-russia-in-election-hackings-776086083639
  • Hanergy - behind the empire of China’s richest man

    This investigation into suspicious trading in one of the most highly-valued yet mysterious companies on the Hong Kong stock exchange combined innovative software-driven analysis and exclusive forensic reporting to explore apparent market manipulation at Hanergy, the Chinese solar giant. After the FT’s stories, Hanergy shares crashed to earth, pre-empting the broader plunge in Chinese equities and highlighting concerns over the true financial state of some of the new Chinese companies that have rocketed to prominence in the last few years.
  • Smoked Out

    A CBC Edmonton investigation revealed the process for selecting a legal consortium to represent the province of Alberta in a multi-billion dollar lawsuit against the tobacco industry had been manipulated. The lawsuit, the largest in the government’s history, is worth potentially billions of dollars to the province’s coffers and hundreds of millions of dollars in contingency fees for the legal consortium. The manipulation allowed now-former premier Alison Redford the opportunity to choose a consortium to which she had close personal and political ties.
  • Harper Lee Concerns

    This piece was the next-day story on the announcement that "Go Set a Watchman" by Harper Lee would be released in summer 2015. It was the first piece in the country to report on the fact that there were extensive concerns among people who knew Lee that she was being manipulated into publishing the book, and that she was not mentally competent to handle her affairs. This piece was the first in the world to report on these issues in the wake of the "Go Set a Watchman" in a manner that included new, firsthand interviews, and kicked off months of coverage of these vital concerns about Lee and the circumstances of the book's publication.
  • 935 Lies: The Future of Truth and the Decline of America's Moral Integrity

    935 Lies explores the many ways truth is manipulated by governments and corporations. Through examples ranging from the countless lies administrations of both parties have used to justify needless wars to the successful, decades-long corporate suppression of the truth about tobacco and other dangerous products, the author shows how the value of truth is diminished by delay. He explains the political, social, and business changes that have increasingly weakened the ability of journalists to play their traditional truth-telling role. And he describes the new trends, such as the new nonprofit journalism ecosystem that give reason to be hopeful about the future of truth. (excerpted from the book jacket).
  • Understanding Libor

    The Financial Times was quick to realize the broad implications of a worldwide investigation by regulators into Libor – the London interbank offered rate – and throughout 2012, pursued the probe into the possible manipulation of benchmark interest rates as a pivotal and challenging reporting opportunity. The FT realized that Libor was a pivotal underpinning to the global financial system. Allegations of corruption by banks or individuals in rigging Libor could expose grave flaws in the banking and raise questions about the need for structural and cultural reform. The FT, a global news organization, focused a sizable staff in its bureaus in New York, London, Washington, Tokyo, Brussels and Zurich on tracking revelations in the case, finding traders linked to the probe and sourcing regulators in more than ten agencies across the globe who were involved in the inquiry. Beat reporters Kara Scannell and Brooke Masters, in New York and London respectively, had spent months in 2010 and 2011 digging into Libor allegations; by September 2011, the FT published the first story about a possible criminal probe. By early 2012, the Financial Times was poised to own the story and did throughout the year – breaking news, illuminating how banks and traders could make money in small changes in the rate and creating innovative online resources, databases, videos and podcasts on a daily and weekly basis to keep the story fresh and original. Its coverage was relentless, ahead-of-the-curve and visionary. Its digital story telling – and its interactive graphic “Understanding Libor” – was superior in helping readers understand this complex story.
  • Understanding Libor

    The Financial Times was quick to realize the broad implications of a worldwide investigation by regulators into Libor – the London interbank offered rate – and throughout 2012, pursued the probe into the possible manipulation of benchmark interest rates as a pivotal and challenging reporting opportunity. The FT realized that Libor was a pivotal underpinning to the global financial system. Allegations of corruption by banks or individuals in rigging Libor could expose grave flaws in the banking and raise questions about the need for structural and cultural reform. The FT, a global news organization, focused a sizable staff in its bureaus in New York, London, Washington, Tokyo, Brussels and Zurich on tracking revelations in the case, finding traders linked to the probe and sourcing regulators in more than ten agencies across the globe who were involved in the inquiry. Beat reporters Kara Scannell and Brooke Masters, in New York and London respectively, had spent months in 2010 and 2011 digging into Libor allegations; by September 2011, the FT published the first story about a possible criminal probe. By early 2012, the Financial Times was poised to own the story and did throughout the year – breaking news, illuminating how banks and traders could make money in small changes in the rate and creating innovative online resources, databases, videos and podcasts on a daily and weekly basis to keep the story fresh and original. Its coverage was relentless, ahead-of-the-curve and visionary. Its digital story telling – and its interactive graphic “Understanding Libor” – was superior in helping readers understand this complex story.
  • Dark Markets

    The Wall Street Journal’s coverage of financial markets in 2012 performed a rare and extraordinary service: It exposed evidence of hidden manipulation by corporate executives and professional traders that the markets’ official government watchdogs were utterly unaware of. Reflecting potential widespread harm to millions of ordinary investors, federal prosecutors and securities regulators raced to follow the Journal stories with major investigations. A team of reporters spent six months creating a database examining how more than 20,000 corporate executives traded their own companies’ stocks over the course of eight years. What the team found was disturbing: More than 1,000 executives had generated big profits, or avoided big losses, by trading their company stock in the days ahead of corporate news announcements that led to big moves in the shares. The Journal also exposed a regulatory loophole that had helped the executives take advantage of inside knowledge ahead of other investors. The Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Manhattan U.S. Attorney's office and the Securities and Exchange Commission all launched investigations the day the Journal article appeared.
  • Empty-desk epidemic

    For years, Chicago officials published upbeat statistics that masked a crisis in the city's schools: Nearly 32,000 of the city's K-8 grade students — or roughly 1 in 8 —miss a month or more of class per year, while others simply vanish from school without a trace. This devastating pattern of absenteeism, which disproportionately affects African-Americans and children with disabilities, came to light only after Chicago Tribune reporters dug it out during a years-long FOIA battle to obtain internal district data.