Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "mapping" ...

  • Bombs In Your Backyard

    The military might of the United States has come at an extraordinary environmental price. The nation’s defense technologies and armaments have been developed, tested, stored, decommissioned and disposed of on vast tracts of American soil, where they have polluted fields and rivers, contaminated drinking water and put legions of people’s health at risk. For the first time, this project examined the full extent of the damage — 39,000 sites adding up to an area larger than the state of Florida, affecting millions of people. Our stories exposed the Pentagon’s routine practice of open burning of hazardous waste; its reliance on incompetent or fraudulent contractors that dump waste or fake cleanups; its four-decade campaign to make a dangerous and pervasive chemical explosive appear safe and avoid regulation; and its explicit refusal to comply with federal environmental laws even when the exposure of young children to lead poisoning from munition was at stake. We gained exclusive access to the Pentagon’s complete environmental dataset, and created a news application which for the first time mapped searchable data about contaminated sites across U.S. territories.
  • Myanmar Burning

    A Reuters series documents the mass expulsion of the Rohingya from Myanmar, including the investigation that landed our reporters in prison.
  • How an internet mapping glitch turned a random Kansas farm into a digital hell

    This series found people who have been affected by mistakes in digital cartography, or the mapping of internet-connected devices via their IP addresses to the physical world. The story's major finding was that a widely-used Boston-based company called MaxMind that maps IP addresses had chosen default locations around the country for devices it could not map precisely. Some of those locations were on the property of homeowners. It resulted in millions of IP addresses being inaccurately mapped to these people's homes, and when the IP address was used to do something bad online, legal authorities and internet vigilantes assumed the people who lived at the homes were the culprits. https://gimletmedia.com/episode/53-in-the-desert/
  • IP Mapping

    This series found people who have been affected by mistakes in digital cartography, or the mapping of internet-connected devices via their IP addresses to the physical world. Our major finding was that a widely used Boston-based company called MaxMind that maps IP addresses had chosen default locations around the country for devices it could not map precisely. Some of those locations were on the property of homeowners. It resulted in millions of IP addresses being inaccurately mapped to these people's homes, and when the IP address was used to do something bad online, legal authorities and internet vigilantes assumed the people who lived at the homes were the culprits. https://gimletmedia.com/episode/53-in-the-desert/
  • Welcome to Herointown

    The Herointown project used a combination of crowdsourcing, data crunching, data visualization and illustration to create a semi-fictional city that contained all 128,000 active heroin users in New Jersey. It was a unique means of opening up people's eyes to the breadth of the problem and showing those struggling they weren't alone. Through this narrative device, we were able to simultaneously show people the scope of the issue as well as connect them to the nuance in their own backyards.
  • NBC5 Investigates: Inside the Frontlines - Kids Who Can't Be Kids

    What do kids in Chicago’s most dangerous neighborhoods face, on a daily basis, when they walk to school or play in a nearby park? NBC5 Investigates set out to look at these kids’ daily lives with an investigative edge, combing through city crime data and mapping the incidents to show exactly how much danger these children face every day, just by walking out the door.
  • L.A.'s Earthquake Risks

    The Los Angeles Times’ look at earthquake safety exposes how spotty mapping of faults, substandard construction and uneven regulation make hundreds of buildings in Southern California susceptible to collapse.
  • Asiana Flight 214 Crash

    NBC Bay Area’s news team set the bar for coverage of the crash of Asiana flight 214. We provided on the scene live reports, graphics, unique details and facts along with unmatched analysis and aviation expertise. Combined, this coverage gave our audience the news in real time, with unique details learned only through us, told within context, all non-stop and commercial-free for the next seven and a half hours plus new details uncovered by our investigative team in the days immediately following the crash. In the minutes and hours following the crash, NBC Bay Area’s team broke every major detail of the crash, including: • First detailed mapping of the airport and accident scene • First details that the airport’s electronic glide slope was out of service • First survivor interview with first person account of crash • First audio from tower • First detailed coordinates of the plane’s position during landing, including its unstabilized approach • First to report the plane had been coming in too low and too slow to land safely • First details of how one passenger fatality was caused by a fire truck running over her
  • Hung Out to Dry

    FEMA is currently in the “final stages of revisiting all of the flood maps throughout the country”. The investigation revealed major problems in the mapping and these mistakes could be costly to the residents in these areas. These residents living in the “flood zones” must pay flood insurance or risk losing their homes. Many of the residents believe they should be excluded from the flood area and come together to prove FEMA wrong.
  • Economic Stress Map

    The AP Economic Stress Map was conceived as a way to graphically analyze the impact of the recession on American communities, and to track changes over time. The map was first published on May 17, 2009 and is updated monthly. It plots three key economic indicators: unemployment; foreclosures; and bankruptcies.