Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "marines" ...

  • A Marine’s Convictions

    A Marine fights to prove he’s innocent of sexual misconduct. Then a lost cellphone is found.
  • The Tender Soldier: A True Story of War and Sacrifice

    "The Tender Soldier" is the first deeply reported narrative nonfiction account of the Human Terrain System, a controversial, experimental Army program that embeds civilian social scientists, including anthropologists, psychologists and sociologists, with front line combat units to provide cultural knowledge and intelligence to soldiers and marines. The program was developed in the early years of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and launched its first field team in Khost, Afghanistan in 2007.
  • The CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley: Bringing Home America’s Fallen Correspondent: Chip Rei

    Four-story series on waste and mismanagement within the Pentagon agencies responsible for bringing home the remains of 83,000 US military personnel who never returned from battle. Despite a budget of more than $100 million, the series revealed the POW/MIA Accounting Community, as it is officially known, has a very poor record of repatriating and identifying remains. In fact, the Pentagon’s results were eclipsed by those of a non-profit charity whose work we carefully documented. Two days after our first story ran, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel ordered a thorough review of the sprawling Pentagon bureaucracy. The CBS reporters followed up with another story when Hagel ordered a massive reorganization. The story included interviews with family members who endured years of agony while they pleaded for answers from the Pentagon. CBS also reported on a highly critical DoD Inspector General’s report months before it was officially released. The fourth story in the series tracked the work of History Flight, a charity that has successfully recovered WWII remains on the Pacific Island of Tarawa. CBS reporters traveled to Tarawa with six US Marines, now in their 90s, on their first return visit since they fought there in 1943. The series documented the emotional scene as they witnessed History Flight’s painstaking recovery of their fellow Marines. http://vimeo.com/cbseveningnews/review/115438489/56d862cc1e
  • Safe from War | Dead at Home

    This three-day series was the culmination of a yearlong project that took an unprecedented look at the untimely deaths of Marines in Southern California’s High Desert. We set out to produce something revelatory, and ultimately discovered trends that have never been reported before, and were likely unknown even to the military itself. Our series discovered that the rural Marine base in Twentynine Palms, CA suffered more non-combat deaths on American soil than war casualties between 2007 and 2012. Our reporting revealed that the base had an extremely high rate of off-duty car crashes, which was worsened by a culture of heavy drinking and a reckless, “invincible” mindset held by many Marines. The series also showed that Marines who took their own life at the Twentynine Palms base were twice as likely to be under the influence of alcohol as the average Marine suicide.
  • Dishonor

    “Dishonor” shines a light on the shocking problem of rape in the U.S. military. A female soldier in a combat zone is more likely to be raped by a fellow soldier than killed by enemy fire. In 2010 the Pentagon estimated 19,000 service members were sexually assaulted. Of these assaults only a tiny fraction were prosecuted. Natalie Morales investigates what happened to Marine officer Claire Russo. She was brutally sodomized by a fellow marine but the Marines dropped the investigation early on. A vigilant NCIS agent assigned to her case wouldn't allow justice to die in the military so he took it to the D.A. in California, and her rapist pleaded guilty. Russo says the way the military treated her rape is typical, and her case is only unique in that she got justice. Morales spoke to a group of former service members from each branch of the military who had similar stories of sexual assault and retaliation by the military for reporting their rapes. Morales asks Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta: "are rapists getting away with rape?" In a response to all of the victims of sexual assault Panetta apologizes and vows that the military will do better. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21134540/vp/49202943#49202943
  • Booted From Army With PTSD, without Benefits

    According to Defense Department records, more than 20,000 soldiers and Marines were booted from the military between 2008 and 2011 with other-than-honorable discharges. Current federal law says these former service members -- even if they suffer from the mental or physical wounds of war -- lose their automatic right to veterans’ medical benefits. Those include Jarrid Starks of Salem, Oregon. He was kicked out of the Army with little more than a 90 day supply of pills to kept him stable. He appealed his case to the Veterans’ Administration. Our reporting showed it can take more than a year for the agency to come up with an answer for these troubled veterans.
  • Semper Fi: Always Faithful

    Marine Corps Master Sgt. Jerry Ensminger was a devoted marine for nearly 25 years. As a drill instructor, he lived and breathed the Marine Corps and was responsible for training thousands of new recruits. When Jerry’s nine-year-old daughter Janey died of a rare type of leukemia, his world collapsed. As a grief-stricken father, he struggled for years to make sense of what happened. His search for answers led to the shocking discovery of one of the largest water contamination sites in US history. For thirty years, unbeknownst to the Marines living there, the Marine Corps improperly disposed of toxic cleaning solvents that contaminated the drinking water at North Carolina’s Camp Lejeune Marine Corps Base. It is estimated that nearly one million Marines and their families may have been exposed to high levels of carcinogens through the water. 25 years after the wells were finally closed, only a fraction of former residents know about their exposure to the toxic chemicals. In the process of investigating the Camp Lejeune contamination, a larger issue comes into focus - the abysmal environmental record of the military. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Defense is the United States’ largest polluter, which raises grave questions about environmental conditions at other bases across the country. “Semper Fi: Always Faithful” is a timely and sobering story of the betrayal of US soldiers and is a call to action for more environmental oversight of military sites.
  • Camp Lejeune: Deadly Waters

    Marines at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina had been exposed to toxic drinking and bathing water for 30 years despite warnings from outside contractors. When people began raising questions about the contaminated water, base officials ignored them.
  • "The Lonely Soldier"

    In her book, author Helen Benedict reveals what it is like to be a female in the military and serving overseas. She shares stories of sexual abuse and "discrimination against women and people of color." Female soldiers also suffer from health problems caused by the "lack of adequate medical care for women." Benedict also looks at the lives of women after they return home who suffer from isolation and "multiples traumas of combat and sexual assault."
  • A Tampa Case of Stolen Valor

    “A local man has been joining veteran’s organizations around the Tampa area”. He often comes dressed in a marine uniform, showing off his “Navy Cross”, which he was awarded while serving his country. It turns out that he never won the award, was never a part of the Marines, and never even served for the US Military. Further, he was charged with violating the “Stolen Valor Act” and forging government documents.