Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "marketplace" ...

  • The Real Question

    Our 4 1/2-month investigation uncovered how The RealReal, a high-profile $1.5 billion public company that bills itself as the world's largest online marketplace for luxury merchandise, does not have experts authenticating every item as the company claims, leading to obvious counterfeits being sold on the website.
  • Toronto Star/CBC - Secret Scalpers

    Online ticket sales have changed everything you thought you knew about getting into your favorite concert or sporting event. In a year-long coproduction, the Toronto Star and CBC exposed how the traditional competing forces of the box office and the scalpers have been replaced by a ticket marketplace where the box office is the scalper. Using a pioneering technique to scrape data from online ticket sellers, we showed the dominance of the scalping market and the tricks used by box offices to get you to pay more. We also went undercover to reveal how TicketMaster works in cahoots with the scalpers it claims to combat.
  • Tangled up in debt

    In late 2017, The Hechinger Report began a deep dive into cosmetology education in Iowa, an education marketplace that has long eluded scrutiny and whose graduates comprise a poorly paid and “invisible” workforce. For-profit beauty schools have maintained a near-monopoly on the sector and kept state regulations to their liking, and where, despite the schools’ hefty price tags, student earnings years after graduation often remain low. The story was a collaboration with The New York Times.
  • CBC Marketplace - Crying Out for Care

    Crying Out for Care was a 22-minute episode of Marketplace and digital, social, television and radio stories to reach a broad audience. Marketplace is a long-running Canadian Broadcasting Corporation investigative consumer affairs television program. its stories are presented in documentary form on the show and other versions, angles and follow-ups appear in the newscasts,news programs, website and social media of CBC. This submission includes the Marketplace episode and includes some of that other coverage. Topic: Marketplace applied data journalism techniques as well as it usual research to dig into the quality of care residents in nursing and long term care homes are receiving.
  • Obamacare: Insurance Lost

    One week after President Obama touted the supposed affordability of Obamacare, claiming it costs less than $75 a month for most people, we found there was no state in which average policies priced anywhere close to $75: the national average was quadruple. Premium increases and higher deductibles provided such sticker shock that many Americans began giving up their insurance altogether, creating what we discovered to be a new class of uninsured under Obamacare. We learned that almost all of the increase in the number of insured has been due to Medicaid expansion under Obamacare, not the marketplace. We also demonstrated that just because you have a plastic insurance card in your wallet doesn’t mean your health services are covered: Millions are forced to buy health insurance, under the Affordable Care Act, that’s of little value until they pay tens of thousands out of pocket annually. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aVbNVJ5qe8o
  • Nuclear Black Market Seeks IS Extremists

    The AP investigation found that a remote corner of Eastern Europe has become a thriving marketplace for nuclear material aimed at extremists in the Middle East. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lBCi3lyftvo
  • Maryland's Failed Health Exchange

    Baltimore Sun reporters Andrea K. Walker and Meredith Cohn investigated what contributed to Maryland's troubled roll-out of its state-run health insurance marketplace. Emails between state officials and contractors as well as court documents revealed infighting and ineffectual oversight hampered efforts to launch and repair the state health care exchange.
  • Costly Generics

    Generic drugs now make up around 80 percent of prescriptions filled, and many assume generics are always cheap. But a PBS NewsHour Weekend investigation found that’s not always the case. Retail prices for generic drugs can vary wildly from pharmacy to pharmacy – a fact few consumers know anything about. The story was very personal for PBS NewsHour Weekend correspondent Megan Thompson, whose mother Carol discovered that the cost of a month’s supply of her generic breast cancer drug Letrozole ranged from around $10 to more than $400 at pharmacies around the Twin Cities. Thompson also spoke to Lisa Gill at Consumer Reports who led a national survey of retail prices for five new generics. Gill said their results were unprecedented - the biggest price variations they’d ever seen in a drug pricing study. The consequences of these huge price variations can be dire. The uninsured, or people with inadequate drug coverage or high deductibles, could overpay by hundreds if not thousands of dollars. Or, they could end up going without medications they need. Thompson interviewed Lisa Duncan of Brooklyn Park, MN, who is bipolar and has a history of suicide attempts. After she became uninsured, she couldn’t afford a big-name chain’s price of more than $100 for one of her prescriptions, so she left the store empty-handed. Duncan says she found the same drug at CostCo for a tenth of the price and was able take the drug again as needed. As the nation grapples with skyrocketing health care costs, “Costly Generics” is an important consumer story that shines a light on the murky prescription drug marketplace, where it’s hard to know how much drugs are supposed to cost, and is very difficult to find or compare prices. And vulnerable populations who need medications the most – the elderly, or chronically ill -- may also be the least likely to have to have the resources to navigate this opaque marketplace. One viewer wrote that after watching the story, she called around and found her prescription for $28 at a local drug store, compared to $72 at CVS.
  • Death in Singapore

    “Death in Singapore”, an investigation by the Financial Times, made global headlines in 2013 and shone a spotlight on security and technology safeguards as well as the vulnerabilities of workers in the vast and competitive marketplace of commercial and defense research. An original and painstaking reporting effort, the story investigated the hanging of Shane Todd, a young American electronics engineer who feared his work with a government agency in Singapore was compromising US security. This classic example of long-form journalism became one of the most read stories ever on ft.com, receiving more than half a million page views. It triggered demands from US senators for a more robust examination about whether or why Todd may have killed himself as well as questions from the US State Department. The FBI was brought into the investigation – which the family had been asking for – after the FT report.
  • The Child Exchange: Inside America’s underground market for adopted children

    Child welfare officials had heard the anecdotes: Desperate parents who felt they could no longer raise children they’d adopted overseas were using the Internet to offer those children to strangers. How often was it happening, and what became of the kids? Because parents handled the custody transfers privately, nobody knew. No government agency was involved, and none was investigating the practice, called “private re-homing.” For 18 months, Reuters reporters committed to a task that the government had never attempted. We sought to document cases of illicit custody transfers by dissecting one of a half dozen little-known online bulletin boards where struggling parents congregated – a marketplace we called The Child Exchange.