Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "massacre" ...

  • Role of Obama-era school discipline policies in Parkland massacre

    Most news media neglected a huge part of the Parkland school massacre. They did so by focusing largely on the roles played by gun laws and mental illness in Nikolas Cruz’s rampage. Paul Sperry went against the grain, in a series of reports for RealClearInvestigations that exposed a central factor in the horror: an Obama-era push that made school discipline more lenient across the country because of concerns that minority students, especially African-Americans, were being disciplined at much higher rates than other Americans. Sperry was the first to report, and to comprehensively detail, this broad and ultimately misguided effort to end the “school to prison pipeline.”
  • 60 Minutes: War Crime

    60 MINUTES has obtained rare video of a 2017 sarin gas attack on Syrian civilians that drew a 59-missile response by the U.S. military last year. The disturbing high definition video, shown publically for the first time, exposes the horrors of these internationally banned weapons, that the Syrian Dictator Bashar al-Assad continues to use to massacre his own people.
  • The Girl From Kathmandu: Twelve Dead Men and a Woman's Quest for Justice

    A nonfiction narrative of Iraq war profiteering, human trafficking, and the battle to defend human rights in U.S. courts. "A powerful work of investigative journalism, one that speaks volumes about the business of war and of human slavery alike.” -- Kirkus Reviews.
  • Surviving an ISIS Massacre

    ISIS massacred hundreds of Iraqi military recruits in June. Ali Hussein Kadhim survived. This is his improbable story. [Includes graphic images.]
  • Mexico Violence

    The June 30 press release from the Mexican Defense Secretary stated that military personnel had discovered a warehouse filled with armed men who opened fire on the troops. Soldiers repelled the attack, 22 “presumed aggressors” died – and just one soldier was wounded. The experienced Mexico staff of The Associated Press doubted the official story: 22 dead on one side, zero on the other seemed unlikely in a firefight. Correspondent Mark Stevenson set out for the warehouse in a remote area of the state of Mexico known to be rife with drug traffickers, and discovered evidence of a massacre. This series details what the AP investigation uncovered.
  • Newtown 911 Tapes

    In the face of opposition from government officials, the public and colleagues in the media, The Associated Press aggressively fought for 911 records and documents related to the 2012 massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School. The request, begun as a routine newsgathering effort, turned into a high-profile fight for public information as state legislators tried to claw back Connecticut’s open records laws.
  • Nazi Past

    It was a sensational find by AP reporters David Rising and Randy Herschaft _ a suspected Nazi war criminal living in the United States, hiding in plain view for more than six decades. More than just a low ranking foot soldier, suspect Michael Karkoc was an officer who commanded a combat company responsible for civilian massacres, and a founding member of the SS-led Ukrainian Self Defense Legion _ and had never before come across authorities' radar. In an eight-month investigation with reporting in more than a half dozen countries and documents in five languages, the two were able to put together evidence so solid that it has led to criminal investigations in Poland and Germany, and not officially confirmed investigations in the United States and Ukraine, with Germany already recommending that prosecutors pursue murder charges against Karkoc. Rising and Herschaft were able to prove Karkoc lied to American officials when he immigrated to Minnesota in 1949, saying he never served in the military during the war _ which has been enough in similar cases for a Nazi war crimes suspect to be deported. But the investigation went much deeper, with the two uncovering details from eyewitnesses, wartime documents and Cold War-era archives firmly establishing not only that Karkoc's unit massacred civilians, but that he specifically gave the order to attack a village in which more than 40 men, women and children were gunned down and burned in their homes.
  • Kill Anything That Moves

    Americans have long been taught that events such as the notorious My Lai massacre were isolated incidents in the Vietnam War, carried out by "a few bad apples." But as award‑winning journalist and historian Nick Turse demonstrates in this groundbreaking investigation, violence against Vietnamese noncombatants was not at all exceptional during the conflict. Rather, it was pervasive and systematic, the predictable consequence of orders to "kill anything that moves." Drawing on more than a decade of research in secret Pentagon files and extensive interviews with American veterans and Vietnamese survivors, Turse reveals for the first time how official policies resulted in millions of innocent civilians killed and wounded. In shocking detail, he lays out the workings of a military machine that made crimes in almost every major American combat unit all but inevitable. "Kill Anything That Moves" takes us from archives filled with Washington's long-suppressed war crime investigations to the rural Vietnamese hamlets that bore the brunt of the war; from boot camps where young American soldiers learned to hate all Vietnamese to bloodthirsty campaigns like Operation Speedy Express, in which a general obsessed with body counts led soldiers to commit what one participant called "a My Lai a month." Thousands of Vietnam books later, "Kill Anything That Moves," devastating and definitive, finally brings us face‑to‑face with the truth of a war that haunts Americans to this day.
  • Finding Oscar - What Happened At Dos Erres

    The story of Oscar, a Guatemalan illegal immigrant who learns he was the survivor of a massacre that killed 250 people in a village in Guatemala thirty years ago. The story reconstructed the massacre, the investigations in both Guatemala and the United States and the extraordinary saga of Oscar, who learned that his life had been a lie and was reunited with his father. Series also showed how the Guatemalan military officers who committed the massacre brazenly eluded justice for years and how one of them won both U.S. and Canadian citizenship because of errors and oversights by U.S. and Canadian governments.
  • Newtown School Massacre

    A gunman killed 20 first graders and six adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School. The Courant deployed its most seasoned and well-connected reporters after the tragic killing with a goal of providing accurate and detailed information in the hours and days after the incident.