Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "meat" ...

  • Dangerous Jobs, Cheap Meat

    Americans love meat – we have one of the highest rates of consumption in the world. While U.S. shoppers enjoy relatively low prices and an array of choices, there is a high human price tag. The more than 500,000 men and women who work in slaughterhouses and meat processing plants have some of the most dangerous factory jobs in America. The meatpacking industry has made a lot of progress on worker safety since publication of Upton Sinclair’s “The Jungle” in 1906, but some things remain the same: the work is mostly done by immigrants and refugees; they suffer high rates of injuries and even, sometimes death; and the government lags in oversight. http://harvestpublicmedia.org/content/dangerous-jobs-cheap-meat
  • Meatpackers Struggled to Sell Import-Labeled Beef

    Country-of-origin labeling, trade, cattle & beef prices U.S. meatpackers struggled to sell import-labeled beef and country-of-origin labels did not significantly affect beef and cattle prices. Both findings undermined the arguments for removing country-of-origin labeling at the behest of the meatpacking industry, which stood to benefit from the removal to the detriment of domestic ranchers.
  • China's Animal Activists

    In China, passion for animal welfare is driving a grassroots movement challenging economic interests and political authorities. In 2014 activists confronted the dog meat trade as never before, intercepting transports on the highways and attempting to stop an annual dog meat festival in the city of Yulin. Most acted out of a deep love for animals, which has awakened as pets have become increasingly popular among the middle class and the Buddhist value of compassion has reemerged after decades of disfavor. This article tells the story of several weeks during June of 2014 when a group of activists went to Yulin to challenge the festival.
  • Cock Fight: One Man’s Battle Against The Chicken Industry

    Chicken is by far the most popular meat in the United States. Every year, 9 billion are slaughtered for food. But very little is actually known about how they are grown, raised and killed. Indications are that the U.S. chicken industry, which is controlled by four major companies, would prefer to keep it that way. It’s not easy to get a camera into the sheds where industrial poultry is raised, known as a “broiler farm.” But Craig Watts, a third generation farmer from North Carolina, was willing to give the Fusion Investigates team unprecedented access to his operation, where he churns out roughly 120,000 birds every two months. http://interactive.fusion.net/cock-fight/
  • The Trouble with Chicken

    FRONTLINE investigates the spread of dangerous pathogens in our meat -- particularly poultry -- and why the food-safety system isn't stopping the threat. Focusing on an outbreak of Salmonella Heidelberg at one of the nation's largest poultry processors, the documentary reveals how contaminants are evading regulators and causing more severe illnesses at a time when Americans are consuming more chicken than ever. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/trouble-with-chicken/transcript/
  • The Meat Racket

    "The Meat Racket" talks about the food industry in America and how it might be affecting our lives and farmers.
  • Michigan prison food privatization gone wrong

    Free Press Lansing bureau chief Paul Egan produced a series of exclusive reports on Michigan’s attempt to privatize prison food service and kept the heat up throughout 2014. His headlines included such stomach-turners as maggots found on meal lines, sex between Aramark employees and inmates, inmates served rotten meat, marijuana smuggling by an Aramark employee, growing inmate unrest -- even an Aramark worker who was suspected of trying to hire an inmate to kill another inmate. The stories prompted widespread revulsion and criticism of the contractor from Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder – along with calls from Michigan lawmakers to cancel the three-year, $145 million Aramark contract.
  • Meat re-packing in grocery store

    Radio-Canada's investigation brought to light an illegal practice that had been going on for years and that the agrifood industry was determined to keep under wraps: the systematic altering of packaging dates on meat sold in grocery stores to make consumers believe it was fresher than it actually was. Each morning, store butchers were taking packaged meats from the shelves and relabeling them with a later packaging date.
  • Most trafficked mammal

    The pangolin -- a little-known, scale-covered mammal -- is thought by scientists to be the most trafficked mammal in the world. Conservationists fear it could go extinct before most people realize it exists. To try to ensure that doesn’t happen, CNN’s John Sutter traveled, at times undercover, to Vietnam and Indonesia to introduce readers and viewers to this loveably introverted creature, and to expose the massive, illegal trade in its meat and scales. Traveling alone, and at times using hidden cameras and recording devices, Sutter met with wildlife traffickers and pangolin in Sumatra, Indonesia. He followed undercover wildlife cops in Hanoi, Vietnam, to a number of restaurants and markets that deal in pangolin products. This work exposed the ease with which pangolin traders are able to operate in these countries, in part because the pangolin has maintained a lower profile than rhinos and elephants. It also helped explain the rise in demand for pangolin scales and meat in Southeast Asia. Sutter’s work also humanized and popularized the pangolin, a creature he described as “elusive, nocturnal, rarely appreciated and barely understood.”
  • How the USDA’s new ‘chicken rule’ could change what you eat, and how it’s inspected

    This special investigative report from KCPT's Hale Center for Journalism explored the possible impact of a new federal regulation known as the “chicken rule” - that could be one of the most far reaching changes in U.S. meat inspection history. Weeks before it went into effect, reporter Mike McGraw investigated how the chicken rule will allow poultry plant employees — instead of USDA inspectors — to help determine whether chicken is contaminated or safe to eat. McGraw also investigated the impact of the severe shortage of federal inspectors in slaughterhouses - critics and some inspectors claimed some meat in supermarkets stamped as “USDA inspected” may never have been inspected at all.