Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "memo" ...

  • The Oregonian: False Comfort

    Thousands of desperate families have turned to an industry that charges premium prices on the promise of safety and comfort for loved ones with dementia. Yet in Oregon, memory care facilities have twice the rate of abuse as other forms of assisted living, The Oregonian/OregonLive's exhaustive analysis of state data found.
  • Smithsonian Magazine and Reveal, in partnership with The Investigative Fund: The Costs of the Confederacy

    Defenders of Confederate memorials often speak of them as history to be preserved. But a project from Smithsonian Magazine and Reveal, in partnership with The Investigative Fund, found that many of these monuments, created by Jim Crow governments, receive substantial taxpayer support in the present. Lead reporters Brian Palmer and Seth Freed Wessler found at least $40 million in public monies over the past decade directed to Confederate sites and organizations that embrace white-supremacist ideologies and suppress or whitewash slavery.
  • NYT: Cashing in On Cancer

    Conflicts riddle Memorial Sloan Kettering. Top doctors and executives benefit from lucrative side deals. Its staff feels betrayed, its mission is tainted.
  • NPR/Frontline: Coal's Deadly Dust

    This NPR/Frontline investigation of an epidemic of a fatal lung disease affecting more than 2,000 coal miners used 30 years of government data and internal agency memos to show that federal agency officials knew more than 20 years ago that coal miners were exposed to toxic silica dust, and were suffering severe lung disease, but did not act then or since to directly address silica exposure in coal mines.
  • Coal's Deadly Dust

    This NPR/Frontline investigation of an epidemic of a fatal lung disease affecting more than 2,000 coal miners used 30 years of government data and internal agency memos to show that federal agency officials knew more than 20 years ago that coal miners were exposed to toxic silica dust, and were suffering severe lung disease, but did not act then or since to directly address silica exposure in coal mines.
  • State Police Secrets and Surveillance

    The Texas Department of Public Safety and politicians for years worked behind the scenes to create a system of surveillance, casting a net that included potential criminals and everyday innocent citizens. DPS, the state police, began covering up secrets and limiting media access when The Dallas Morning News Watchdog Desk began investigating. That led to the agency sending private memos to state legislators and staff in an attempt to stop or discredit The News', and other media outlets, story publications.
  • Failure to report: a STAT investigation - Law ignored, patients at risk

    These stories examined how well the nation’s leading clinical research organizations followed the federal law that requires them to report publicly the results of completed clinical trials – experiments involving human subjects. We found that Stanford University, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and other prestigious medical research institutions flagrantly violated the law, depriving patients and doctors of complete data to gauge the safety and benefits of treatments. Nearly all other institutions – including pharmaceutical companies – flouted the requirements routinely. The failure to report has left gaping holes in the federal ClinicalTrials.gov database used by millions of patients, their relatives, and medical professionals, often to compare the effectiveness and side effects of treatments for deadly diseases. The worst offenders included four of the top 10 recipients of research funding from the National Institutes of Health, all of which disclosed results late or not at all at least 95 percent of the time since reporting became mandatory in 2008. http://www.statnews.com/2015/12/13/clinical-trials-investigation-methodology/ http://www.statnews.com/2015/12/13/clinical-trials-investigation/
  • Power Wars: Inside Obama's Post-9/11 Presidency

    Power Wars is a comprehensive investigative history of national security legal policymaking during the Obama presidency. Based on interviews with more than 150 officials and access to numerous internal documents, it takes readers behind the scenes to explain why the administration governed as it did on surveillance, drone strikes, Guantanamo, interrogations, military commissions, secrecy, leak investigations, war powers, and executive power. Bringing large amounts of new information to light about internal deliberations and never-before-reported memos and events, it equips readers to grapple with the recurring accusation that Obama has acted like Bush and to understand the legacy of both presidencies. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0316286575
  • Sunny Skies, Shady Characters: Cops, Killers and Corruption in the Aloha State

    A memoir of James Dooley's 30-plus year career as an investigative reporter for print, television and online news outlets in Hawaii. The book focuses on local, national and international organized crime activities in Hawaii, with emphasis on the yakuza (Japanese gangsters) and Hawaii mobsters' ties to the Teamsters Union. Dooley also writes extensively on political cronyism and corruption in local, state and federal government and details the use of public records to pursue stories. The book explores the difficulties and rewards of reporting in an enclosed market like Hawaii and discusses the shrinkage of investigative journalism in the 50th state.
  • Death Zones & Darling Spies: Seven Years of Vietnam War Reporting

    This memoir is based on Beverly Deepe Keever's body of work covering the Vietnam War for the U.S. media from 1962-1969. The book provides a play-by-play about how the war was being mismanaged politically, militarily and diplomatically by the U.S. government and its allies.