Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "migrant" ...

  • Trapped in Gangland

    The Central American gang MS-13 accounts for 1 percent of U.S. gang murders. But when Donald Trump became president, he seized on the gang’s violence on Long Island to promote tougher immigration policies. This series, co-published with New York magazine, Newsday, The New York Times Magazine and This American Life, showed how Trump’s bungled crackdown on MS-13 burned informants, deported young immigrants suspected of gang involvement on flimsy evidence, and failed to prevent further murders. Based on a year and a half of difficult and dangerous reporting, ProPublica reporter Hannah Dreier’s stories persuasively depicted how an entire subculture of Latino teenagers came to be trapped between the gang and the government.
  • Unlivable: How Texas Fails Farmworkers

    A four-month investigation into the state of Texas’ inspection program for migrant farmworker housing revealed a broken system where regulators have never taken action against growers who house workers in substandard conditions and don't seek out illegally operating facilities.
  • Vermont Ski Resort Developers Accused of Misusing $200M in ‘Ponzi-like‘ Scheme

    VTDigger began exposing allegations of fraud at a ski resort in northern Vermont two years before the Securities and Exchange Commission brought charges last April against the developers in what is now the largest EB-5 immigrant investor fraud case in the nation’s history. After the story broke, we investigated how the state of Vermont failed to protect investors.
  • Migrant farmworker housing abuses

    Based on extensive interviews and a review of thousands of inspection reports, the Midwest Center for Investigative Reporting has found that chronically poor living conditions persist because the government agencies responsible for enforcing housing standards are often overwhelmed by workload or rendered ineffective by inadequate budgets and toothless policies. Abusive housing practices of both multibillion-dollar agribusiness corporations and small-scale growers continue to flourish as a result. And migrant farmworkers season after season are left to live in rundown apartments, ramshackle trailers and converted motels.
  • Dangerous Jobs, Cheap Meat

    Americans love meat – we have one of the highest rates of consumption in the world. While U.S. shoppers enjoy relatively low prices and an array of choices, there is a high human price tag. The more than 500,000 men and women who work in slaughterhouses and meat processing plants have some of the most dangerous factory jobs in America. The meatpacking industry has made a lot of progress on worker safety since publication of Upton Sinclair’s “The Jungle” in 1906, but some things remain the same: the work is mostly done by immigrants and refugees; they suffer high rates of injuries and even, sometimes death; and the government lags in oversight. http://harvestpublicmedia.org/content/dangerous-jobs-cheap-meat
  • Buried without a name - The untold story of Europe’s drowned migrants

    This project sought to quantify the number of migrants who had died travelling to Europe between 2014 and May 2016 and who had then been buried in an unmarked grave, with no one able to identify them.
  • Immigrant Children Uncounted

    Japanese local governments fail to track school enrollments of more than ten thousand children with foreign nationality, while Japanese-national counterparts were fully cared to attend school, Kyodo News investigation found. Although all uncounted children are not necessarily out of education, the figure alarms that the government's discriminatory treatment of immigrant children violates the International Human Right Law.
  • Mexico's Crackdown on Central American Migrants

    In January and February 2015, In These Times reporter Joseph Sorrentino interviewed dozens of Central American migrants along one of Mexico's main migration routes. He found that a Mexican government initiative to more aggressively police and deport migrants had forced them to take slower and more dangerous routes, leaving them easier prey to robbery, rape, extortion, kidnapping, assault and murder by gangs and narcos. Mexico's stepped-up border enforcement was the result of U.S. pressure on Mexico to halt the "surge" of Central American children reaching the U.S. border.
  • Between Borders: American Migrant Crisis

    Each week, hundreds of young people—teenagers and children—attempt to flee the gang warfare that has gripped large swaths of Central America, heading north, crossing thousands of miles in hopes of obtaining asylum or settling with relatives in the United States. From October 2013 through July of this year, nearly 80,000 unaccompanied minors arrived at our southern border. In this powerful documentary for The New York Times, Pulitzer Center grantees Brent and Craig Renaud trace the journey from the violent streets of San Pedro Sula, Honduras through Guatemala and across the Suchiate River aboard flimsy rafts to Mexico. From there, some try to hop “the Beast”—a slow-moving freight train. Others hitchhike or simply make the long trek on foot. No matter the method they choose, the risk of arrest by authorities, abuse by human traffickers or abduction by drug cartels is a constant danger. As the debate on immigration takes center stage in the Republican presidential primary campaign, the Renaud brothers look at the causes and conditions that compel children to stake their lives on this dangerous journey. “Between Borders: American Migrant Crisis” shows us the reality of the so-called “illegals” who seek safe shelter in America. http://www.nytimes.com/video/world/americas/100000003901101/central-america-child-migrants.html http://pulitzercenter.org/education/meet-journalists-renaud-honduras
  • Harvest of Terror, Parts 1 & 2

    The first story in the series detailed for the first time the worst instance of workplace rape in modern Florida history. The report revealed how a rural sheriff's office and local prosecutors had failed at least five women who reported being sexually assaulted by their bosses at a packing plant. The piece also revealed how the plant's owner ignored multiple warnings that women were being assaulted at the facility. The second piece documented the larger problem of rapes among migrant women in rural Hendry County, Florida. It described unreported recent rapes in the area and showed that the small county's sexual assault rate is significantly higher than the national average.