Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "minorities" ...

  • How America’s College-Closure Crisis Leaves Families Devastated

    After a chain of for-profit colleges abruptly closed, The Chronicle of Higher Education conducted an in-depth analysis of federal data related to closures. The analysis, which required extensive data work, showed that more than 1,200 college campuses closed in the last five years – an average of 20 closures per month. These closures displaced roughly 500,000 students, most of whom were working adults. The data showed that most of these displaced students were at least 25 years old, and about 57 percent are racial minorities. The vast majority of displaced students – nearly 85 percent – attended a for-profit college. The for-profit industry has received scant oversight from the Trump administration, despite the industry’s long history of problems. The Chronicle’s investigation highlighted the need for greater oversight of this troubled sector of higher education.
  • The Digilantes Try to Find Out Who Is Behind Mugshot.com

    The Digilantes uncovered a multi-million dollar extortion-based industry that’s wreaking havoc upon tens of millions of Americans’ lives, especially minorities. It’s the business of mugshot websites. Operators of these sites scrape public arrest records from online police databases, put them on their own websites, making them easily searchable on Google, and then charge hundreds of dollars to remove them, whether you are guilty or not. These mugshots, which can live forever online, are a form of digital scarlet letter ruining people's’ reputations, job and housing opportunities, even their dating lives. http://fusion.net/story/252451/digilantes-mugshots-dotcom-investigation/
  • Inside the Shady Industry that Profits off Mugshot Photos

    “Mugged,” which premiered on Fusion on March 6, 2016 as part of the network’s monthly investigative “The Naked Truth” series, explores the multi-million dollar extortion industry of mugshot websites, which is wreaking havoc on the lives and reputations of tens of millions of Americans, especially minorities. In a completely legal process, operators of these websites collect public arrest records and photographs from online police databases and post the records on their own websites, often making the content more prominent via search engine optimization. These mugshot websites then charge the arrested individuals hundreds of dollars to remove their records and photos, despite the fact that many of these individuals have been falsely arrested, found innocent, or have yet to stand trial.
  • The Laquan McDonald shooting and the city's broken system

    Under orders from a judge, Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s administration on Nov. 24, haltingly and reluctantly, released a police dash-cam video that showed a white police officer shooting a black teenager, Laquan McDonald. The video roiled Chicago. Protesters took to the streets. The police superintendent was fired. The officer who shot McDonald -- a ward of the state -- was charged with murder. And the U.S. Justice Department launched a civil rights investigation into the nation’s second largest police department. During the next three weeks, Tribune reporters set out to examine how the city and the Chicago Police Department had reached this point, and to put into context McDonald’s life and his fatal encounter with a department with a sordid history of brutality against minorities.
  • Driving with suspended license top crime in Menlo Park, many lose cars

    Over 4.4 million Californians have suspended driver’s licenses simply because they can’t afford to pay a traffic ticket. We chronicled the impact on everyday people and showed how minorities are affected disproportionately, focusing on the Silicon Valley city of Menlo Park, with populations representing the very affluent and the very poor.
  • Shots Fired

    Shots Fired is The Post and Courier's investigation into every police shooting in South Carolina since 2009. Shots Fired exposed how the state failed to properly investigate numerous police shootings, especially when officers fired at vehicles. The series also exposed how minorities were disproportionately affected by police tactics that often lead to gunfire. http://data.postandcourier.com/shots-fired/page/6 http://data.postandcourier.com/shots-fired/data http://data.postandcourier.com/shots-fired/page/1 http://data.postandcourier.com/shots-fired/
  • Racial Profiling Whitewash

    This KXAN investigation uncovered state and local law enforcement agencies wrongly reporting the race of minority drivers during traffic stops. KXAN analyzed more than 16 million Texas Department of Public Safety traffic stop records and revealed the state law enforcement agency systematically under-reported the number of minorities, mostly Hispanics, stopped on Texas roads by state troopers. The investigation questioned the validity of DPS racial profiling reports and led to immediate statewide changes in the way Texas troopers conduct traffic stops and record racial profiling data. KXAN found the same problem in the Austin Police Department which prompted an immediate audit of APD's traffic stop data and race recording practices which found APD in violation of the Texas racial profiling law. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3kEG0q7WR1U
  • An Inside Track

    A groundbreaking investigation by Dallas Morning News reporters Ed Timms and Kevin Krause exposed questionable practices by a nonprofit agency created by local governments in part to avoid public scrutiny of the certification process for minority- and woman-owned businesses.. The reporters and their newspaper fought a lengthy legal battle for more than a year that resulted in a strong legal precedent that may deter other governments from trying to circumvent open records law by forming nonprofits. The investigation revealed that the local governments had relied on a temporary employment firm had operated the nonprofit agency for more than a decade. Employees of that private firm certified their own company as a minority-owned business, even as it won millions in contracts from those same governments. The employees also decided whether their company's competitors and subcontractors got certified. It also disclosed that the company, and other contractors, failed to adequately screen temporary employees provided to Dallas County.
  • Losing Ground

    By some of the most important measures of social progress, the largest minority populations in Colorado, Latinos and blacks, are falling further behind their white counterparts. In an analysis of six decades of data pertaining to family income, home ownership, poverty, high school and college graduation, as well as comparative health and justice figures, I-News determined that Colorado was a more equitable state than most during the era of the Civil Rights Movement, but is less so now. These findings do not bode well for a state in which minorities are the fastest rising population, and, within two decades, likely the majority of the work force.
  • In precincts with higher minority populations, greater chance of casting provisional ballots

    This story presents an analysis of the percentage of provisional ballots cast in precincts across Maricopa County, Arizona during the November 2012 general election. Maricopa County is home to Sheriff Joe Arpaio, and home to several Hispanic rights groups. After the general election in November, some of the groups claimed Hispanics and other minorities were forced to vote provisionally more often than other groups, increasing the likelihood that their votes wouldn't count. This story confirmed that areas with higher rates of minorities did see higher rates of provisional ballots cast.