Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "missile" ...

  • 60 Minutes: War Crime

    60 MINUTES has obtained rare video of a 2017 sarin gas attack on Syrian civilians that drew a 59-missile response by the U.S. military last year. The disturbing high definition video, shown publically for the first time, exposes the horrors of these internationally banned weapons, that the Syrian Dictator Bashar al-Assad continues to use to massacre his own people.
  • 50 Years since the Chinese Cultural Revolution and North Korea: Does the Hydrogen Bomb Test Signal the North Korean Version of the Cultural Revolution?

    North Korea ran a hydrogen bomb test in January, 2016. Some think this signaled the start of Kim Jong-Un’s version of the Cultural Revolution because China’s Cultural Revolution began around the time of their nuclear bomb test in 1964 and their hydrogen bomb test in 1966. The Chinese Cultural Revolution was a sort of power struggle by Mao Zedong where he used the power of the public to get rid of his opponents within the Communist Party and climb back to the top over a period of 10 years starting in 1966. Chinese society ended up with deep scars from hatred and vengeance because of it. For the 50th year anniversary of the Chinese Cultural Revolution, we explore the current state of North Korea’s Kim Jong-Un’s regime, which is carrying out deep-rooted idolization tactics internally while running nuclear weapons and missile tests externally, and try to predict the future of North Korea.
  • Rare Earth Elements

    The U.S. began the march toward the use of rare Earth metals - essential ingredients in everything from smart phones and computers to cars and missiles - but has left most of their mining and processing to others. China now dominates this crucial industry, which worries the U.S. government.
  • The Pentagon’s $10-Billion Bet Gone Bad

    This body of work is the result of reporter David Willman’s investigations of the nation’s dauntingly complex missile-defense programs. The articles reveal how program after program was sold to Congress based on false and misleading claims – ultimately amounting to waste on a grand scale. The U.S. spent $2.2 billion alone for a giant, floating radar that was supposed to scan the skies for long-range missiles from North Korea or other “rogue” nations. But the radar spends most of the year mothballed at Pearl Harbor – and has never docked at its intended Alaskan berth. The “SBX” radar, Willman reported, will never fulfill its intended strategic mission.
  • Nuclear Missteps

    After exposing low morale, training flaws and leadership lapses in the Air Force’s nuclear missile corps in a series of stories in 2013, Robert Burns used the Freedom of Information Act, tips from his network of military sources and interviews with Air Force officers at all levels to reveal in an exclusive series of stories in 2014 that the problems initially denied by the Air Force ran so deep and wide that Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel declared “something is wrong” with the most high-risk arm of the U.S. military.
  • Nuclear Missteps

    Beginning with his discovery of an internal Air Force admission of "rot" infesting its nuclear missile forces, AP National Security Writer Robert Burns probed to extraordinary depths within this highly secretive, rarely investigated organization for eight months to reveal a series of missteps by men and women with their finger on the trigger of the world's most deadly weapons. Using sources inside and outside the Air Force, in Washington and beyond, Burns documented deliberate safety and security violations, personal misbehavior, training failures, leadership lapses and chilling evidence of malaise among those entrusted with nuclear weapons. Burns peeled away the veneer of Air Force assurances that nothing was amiss, and brought to the attention of the American public a fuller picture of a nuclear missile force facing an uncertain future. His reporting prompted the Secretary of Defense, Chuck Hagel, to lament these "troubling lapses" and make a personal visit tot he force to insist they live up to their standards and demonstrate that they can be trusted with nuclear responsibilities.
  • Chinook Down

    In May 2007 - an American Chinook helicopter was shot down by insurgents in southern Afghanistan. The crash killed 7-soldiers. NATO officials suggested the helicopter was brought down by small-arms fire. But classified documents released by WikiLeaks reported the helicopter had been "engaged and struck with a missile," suggesting the Taliban had effectively used a heat-seeking surface-to-air missile - a significant development not publicly disclosed before. Alex Quade, a freelance television reporter, was supposed to be on that helicopter, covering a battalion-size air assault mission involving Special Forces, 1/508th Parachute Infantry Regiment and the 82nd Combat Aviation Brigade. But at the last minute, Quade lost her seat to 2-public affairs officers. She survived to report firsthand on the recovery, including a fierce firefight, and interviewed pilots who reported seeing a missile streaking into the sky and striking the Chinook. Over the years, Quade continued to gather material about the attack on the helicopter, interviewing pilots who provided air support to rescue teams on the ground, obtaining previously unreleased Pentagon documents, via FOIA appeals, and collecting video from soldiers and pilots on the scene. The result of her investigation is a 10-minute video for NYT.com. It is Ms. Quade's Memorial Day tribute to the soldiers she was embedded with, and nearly died with, and a look at the effects of PTSD.
  • "Breach of Trust"

    Soldiers on all levels of the U.S. Armed Forces used fake college diplomas to increase chances of "promotions and pay raises." WHNT-TV revealed that several AMCOM employees had also presented "fake degrees" to the "Department of the Army." The investigation spurred a reconstruction of HR Specialist training, as the command's "ability to detect" to false diplomas was severely flawed.
  • Rat Trap

    In the story, an FBI informant has been known to hound the targets of the investigation with money and gifts, but also “led them by the nose”. He has also “prodded, persuaded and cajoled the targets to advance plans to launder money supposedly used to purchase an anti-aircraft missile”. So this article brought up the FBI’s use of informants and the ethical lines crossed by some of them.
  • Missile Defense: America's Costly Gamble

    Supporters of the Pentagon's planned missile defense system say that eventually it will be able to stop almost any type of missile, in any stage of flight. Cabbage's investigation found that those claims are still a long way from being realized. While some of the basic technology has been developed, the system still needs extensive testing and a lot of refinement. The military's current tests are not challenging enough; they're really just used to make it seem as if the technology is progressing. Partisan politics also have a part in the slow development of the technology and the lack of appropriate testing.