Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "mistreatment" ...

  • Insight with John Ferrugia: Protecting the Vulnerable

    The Rocky Mountain PBS investigation, Protecting the Vulnerable, brought various cases of abuse, neglect, and mistreatment of intellectually disabled adults to the attention of state and local officials as well as community advocates, prompting them to improve the safety of Colorado’s host home system by reviewing and enhancing state regulations and working to develop new legislation.
  • The Catch

    "The Catch" is documentary investigation that found Canada may be complicit in violating international law because the country’s navy and air force assists the U.S. Coast Guard to police international waters and capture suspected drug smugglers, some of whom have reported mistreatment on board U.S. Coast Guard vessels.
  • Alabama's "Beach House Sheriff"

    Over the past decade, Etowah County Sheriff Todd Entrekin has turned the jail he operates in rural Alabama into a vehicle for his own enrichment. In 2018, AL.com investigative reporter Connor Sheets single-handedly exposed the pattern of exploitation and cost-cutting behind Entrekin’s financial success. This investigation revealed extensive wrongdoing by Entrekin, from improperly pocketing millions of dollars worth of public funds and mistreating inmates in his jail to spending public money on campaign ads and allegedly having sex with underage girls.
  • MU's Asian students reluctant to report episodes of discrimination, racism

    The story is to reveal untold stories related to racial discrimination against MU's Asian students. While Na was speaking with more than 100 Asian students and several MU officials who were devising a diversity training that would be mandated for MU freshmen to take, he found several Asian students had undergone obvious racial mistreatment, but were not willing to report; and MU officials did not know of these racial instances suffered among MU Asian students.
  • Families behind the wall: The rise and fall of family detention

    A series of exclusive reports on alleged misconduct and abuse at the Obama administration’s family detention centers. There are more than 50 stories exposing a pattern of accused mistreatment of detainees – some of whom said they were sexually assaulted by guards in front of their children – at three federal facilities run by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement operated in rural Pennsylvania and Texas, far from any major city and the lawyers who worked there.
  • Harsh Treatment

    In Illinois, hundreds of juvenile state wards are assaulted and raped by their peers each year at taxpayer-funded residential treatment centers as authorities fail to act on reports of harm and continue sending waves of youths to the most violent facilities, the Tribune's "Harsh Treatment" investigation found. Prostitution becomes a fact of life at facilities where experienced residents introduce others to pimps, escort websites and street corners. And thousands of kids flee to the streets, where some sold drugs and sex to survive and others broke into homes and mugged passers-by. Dozens have never been found. The reporters gathered thousands of pages of highly protected juvenile case files, successfully petitioned the Cook County juvenile court for access to delinquency files and through relentless FOIA appeals pried free police and state monitoring reports on violent incidents inside the facilities.
  • Lives on the Line

    Reporter Doug Donovan uncovered inadequate care and state oversight of group homes that care for the most vulnerable of citizens: disabled foster children. His investigation revealed that state contractor Lifeline Inc. had numerous problems that were unknown to regulators. After his initial story the state moved the children to another group home. However, Donovan revealed issues with the new provider, including employees who were dismissed for mistreating patients and who lacked specialized training.
  • Cell of squalor, weeks of despair

    A Harris County jail inmate, jailed on a marijuana charge while on probation and in need of mental health care, was left in his cell for weeks without being let out, living amid heaps of trash, swarms of bugs, and piles of his own feces. When inspectors with a jail compliance team entered the cell of inmate Terry Goodwin on October 10, 2013, he was wearing a filthy, shredded jail uniform in the fetid cell. Shards of his orange uniform were hanging from the ceiling light. His sink, toilet and shower drain were clogged, not just with feces, but with toilet paper in an apparent attempt by Goodwin to cover his own waste and with orange rinds, perhaps in futile effort to mask the smell. That’s when the cover-up began.
  • Bound and Punished

    Arkansas law prohibits punishment of juvenile delinquents, requiring instead that child offenders be provided treatment, rehabilitation and safe environments. But at the Yell County Juvenile Detention Center, where hundreds of children have been sent for years, punishment was not only allowed, top administrators encouraged it. State officials responsible for assuring the safety and well-being of youth in county-run detention centers learned of this routine mistreatment only after the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette shared internal incident reports with them.
  • Disastrous Relief

    The Manitoba Association of Native Firefighters (or MANFF) was supposed to be an advocate for Aboriginal evacuees of the devastating Manitoba floods of 2011. Two First Nations communities were completely written-off by flood waters, leaving over 2,000 people homeless. MANFF was to make life easier for these evacuees as they waited-out government wrangling in hotels and rental houses scattered throughout the province, separated form loved ones and their home communities. $85 million (and counting) flowed through MANFF to care for these evacuees. And yet millions of dollars in bills went unpaid. Frustrated and frightened evacuees eventually contacted APTN with reports of bullying and mistreatment by MANFF staff. Melissa Ridgen looks for answers in APTN Investigates’ Season 5 premier, Disastrous Relief.