Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "mold" ...

  • Families complain of mold, lead paint, rats in military housing ahead of hearing

    In February, CBS News gained access to privatized housing at Ft. Meade, becoming the first national television network to go on to a military base to investigate issues within the U.S. military’s privatized housing program. Through our coverage, CBS News exposed problems with mold, insects and structural integrity covered up or ignored by private housing companies. This story led to a swift response from then-Secretary of the Army Mark Esper, who granted an exclusive on-camera interview with CBS News to outline how his department planned to respond.
  • A Dangerous Delay

    In November 2018, Olivia Paregol’s father frantically called the University of Maryland from the intensive care unit at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The 18-year-old freshman, who had lived in a mold-infested dorm, was fighting for her life and doctors couldn’t figure out what was wrong. Was there anything else on campus making students sick? The director of the student health center knew of severe cases of adenovirus on campus but the public had no clue. Less than a week later, Olivia was dead from the virus and the outbreak would sicken dozens of students. It was only after her death that school officials informed the campus about the virus. Ian Paregol had more questions than answers: How long had the university known? Why didn’t they tell Olivia or other students when they showed up sick at the student health center? Washington Post reporters Jenn Abelson, Amy Brittain and Sarah Larimer interviewed more than 100 people and obtained thousands of pages of medical records, hundreds of emails, text messages, voicemails and other documents to reconstruct the events that led to Olivia’s death and threatened the health and safety of thousands of students at the University of Maryland campus. College officials said it would cost $63,000 to disclose internal emails about the outbreak, so reporters obtained many of those records from state and county agencies. In May, the Washington Post published “A Dangerous Delay,” a detailed investigation examining the outbreak of mold and adenovirus at the University of Maryland. The reporters revealed that the school waited 18 days to inform students about the virus and officials discussed — but decided against — notifying students with compromised immune systems, like Olivia, and those living in mold-infested dorms.
  • Toxic City: Sick Schools

    Children in Philadelphia public schools endure environmental hazards -- deteriorated asbestos, damaged lead paint, festering mold and rodent droppings -- that deprive them of a healthy place to learn and thrive. In reaching our major findings, we conducted 175 scientific tests at 19 elementary schools at a cost of nearly $9,000, built a custom database to analyze more than 250,000 room-by-room environmental records, and interviewed more than 120 teachers, parents, students and experts.
  • Killers Inc.

    Killers Inc. investigates the attempted assassination of the prominent Russian banker and businessman Gherman Gorbuntsov in London in 2012. The documentary traces the origins of the attempt to The Republic of Moldova, where our reporters meet Renat Usatii, a controversial pro-Russian Moldovan politician who Gorbuntsov says orchestrated his assassination attempt. As the investigation unfolds in real-time, our reporters come face to face with the employer of Gorbuntsov’s alleged assassin, Ion Druta, who takes us down a rabbit hole where the forces behind the assassination attempt are revealed. Major Findings: •Renat Usatii, a powerful Moldovan politician, was allegedly sent from Russia to Moldova to represent the interests of the powerful Russians from who Gorbuntsov stole money. •Gherman Gorbuntsov, a former banker for the Kremlin-run Russian Railways, allegedly stole hundreds of million dollars from businessmen connected to the Russian Railways and Russian organized crime groups. •Renat Usatii allegedly received support from Russian intelligence services and other influential Russian figures in his bid to build a pro-Russian Moldovan political party. •Vitalie Proca, Gorbuntsov’s alleged assassin, is part of an organized crime group based in Transdniestria and Moldova that offers criminal services for oligarchs, politicians and other crime groups who are soliciting murder, extortion or debt collection. The group is led by a Vor v Zakone named Nicu Patron.
  • The Russian Laundromat

    Call it the Laundromat. It’s a complex system for laundering more than $20 billion in Russian money stolen from the government by corrupt politicians or earned through organized crime activity. It was designed to not only move money from Russian shell companies into EU banks through Latvia, it had the added feature of getting corrupt or uncaring judges in Moldova to legitimize the funds. The state-of-the-art system provided exceptionally clean money backed by a court ruling at a fraction of the cost of regular laundering schemes. It made up for the low costs by laundering huge volumes. The system used just one bank in Latvia and one bank in Moldova but 19 banks in Russia, some of them controlled by rich and powerful figures including the cousin of Russian President Vladimir Putin.
  • Trashed Trailers

    Contaminated flood waters roared through Northern Colorado mobile home parks in September 2013. When the waters receded, some of the homes were soaked to the rooflines and were knocked from their foundations. Hundreds of the homes were condemned and left to rot and mold for months. Government officials presumed the homes would end up in landfills. However, a six-month 9Wants to Know investigation spanning five counties discovered profiteers were sneaking these mobile homes into new communities, fixing them up without proper building permits and safety inspections, and marketing them to unsuspecting families. 9Wants to Know found government regulators were blindsided by the flood trailer problem due to a tremendous lack of oversight in the mobile home industry. As a result of their investigation, government officials scrambled to identify the flooded homes and bar unsafe housing from their communities.
  • Stop The Mold

    Reporters from the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism's NYCity News Service worked with the New York Daily News on a series of stories chronicling the city's losing battle to rid public housing of mold and detailing the related health and financial tolls extracted by the crisis.
  • A Murderer's Trail

    Piecing together custom records, vehicle information, court files and information from law enforcement agents, reporters for The Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project and the Guardian uncovered how a mafia network in Romania and Moldova employed hitmen to keep operations running smoothly.
  • Dirty Ice

    The NBC CT Troubleshooters were given some gross pictures of commercial ice machines by a source in the industry. We were told black slime, mold and other kinds of contaminants cover the machines that dispense your ice at fast food restaurants and other eateries. Our insider says it’s caused from a lack of proper maintenance on the machines. We used our hidden camera and took a closer look at food handling practices in Connecticut and what we found was disturbing. Often times, food service employees DO NOT treat ice as food. The story has created a buzz in the food industry and with the National Sanitation Foundation (NSF certifies ice machines for use in restaurants). In its most recent meeting the NSF discussed looking at ice machines that apparently violate NSF regulations and the FDA Food Code by sucking air and microorganisms from the floor drain (and other places) into the ice bin. This air flow defect was newly discovered and is probably the source of much of the contamination in ice machines we found in our investigation.
  • Moldy Metropolis: Homeowners Struggle with Leaky Concrete

    Poorly built condominiums and the homeowners are now seeing the consequences of the poor construction. The condominiums have severe mold problems, which is a result from using a material called split-free concrete block. The story reveals the lack of building inspection since the blocks should be built without leaks and inspected for leaks. Furthermore, if the homeowners complain to the city, they are held accountable for the code violation.