Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "newsroom" ...

  • Tarnished Brass

    In the name of protecting men and women in uniform, states across the country have made it nearly impossible to identify dangerous law enforcement officers with a track record of violence and other misdeeds. Records detailing their misconduct often are filed away, rarely seen by anyone outside of the department. Police unions and their political allies have worked to put special protections in place ensuring some records are shielded from public view, or even destroyed. A national tracking system for backgrounding officers is incomplete and not available to the public. More than two years ago, USA TODAY and its network of newsrooms across the nation set out to change that. More than two dozen reporters began collecting public records from the communities they covered and beyond. Also contributing substantially to the record-gathering was the Invisible Institute, a nonprofit journalism organization in Chicago that focuses on issues around policing tactics and criminal justice. We pieced together lists of decertified officers in more than 40 states. We collected logs and paper records related to 110,000 internal affairs investigations. We gathered information on 14,000 lawsuits against departments and fought to obtain so-called Brady lists, documenting officers flagged for lying and other misdeeds. Then we scoured story archives from our newsrooms and others to piece together the most comprehensive list of police misconduct cases ever built.
  • WEWS-TV: Broken Trust

    In March 2018, Cleveland’s University Hospitals announced that a catastrophic failure at its fertility clinic resulted in a tank malfunction that destroyed 2,000 embryos – days after News 5 received information from a source and began digging into what happened. We found patients impacted by the failure who shared with us letters they received from the hospital, where University Hospitals claimed some eggs may be salvaged. Within weeks, however, the hospital admitted the situation was significantly worse. In fact, every single egg and embryo, 4,000 in total, was lost. As soon as the news broke of the failure, WEWS-TV understood the magnitude of this failure for the patients. The entire newsroom mobilized to uncover how this could happen and hold hospital officials accountable.
  • The Center for Public Integrity, The Texas Tribune, The Associated Press and Newsy: Blowout

    “Blowout: Inside America’s Energy Gamble” is the result of four newsrooms joining forces for the better part of a year to produce a multi-part investigation — seven stories, one full-length documentary — examining the vast scope, shadowy impetus and sweeping health and climate impacts of America’s largest oil and gas boom. Following key rule changes during the Obama administration that opened the floodgates for oil and gas exports, producers are looking to meet a growing global demand for fossil fuels — and, critics note, to inflate the need. We gave readers a cradle-to-grave look at this phenomenon, starting where the fossil fuels are pulled from the ground and ending in countries where they’re being consumed. Our series exposed the role of the U.S. government as a marketing agent for the fossil-fuel industry at a perilous time in the world’s history, with worsening climate change threatening lives, property and entire communities.
  • Fire Mutual Aid

    Several years ago tips to our newsroom led to what would be come a multi-year effort. Over the course of the years Action News Investigates uncovered slow fire response times as result of a broken and poorly managed system. In 2015, those investigations told in a station-produced documentary won a 2015 Peabody Award. That was only the beginning. Investigative reporter Paul Van Osdol has continued to stay on top of all fire and EMS response stories in the years that followed. In 2018, those stories were prominent once again. This entry highlights several failed responses to fires that in some case, if more efficient, could have saved lives. The entry also highlights the results of these investigations, a state commission review of local fire departments.
  • Tragedy on Table Rock Lake

    Shortly after 7 p.m. on July 19, 2018, a duck boat carrying 31 people sank on Table Rock Lake near Branson, Mo., about 210 miles southeast of Kansas City. Reporters at The Kansas City Star immediately started reporting and writing from the newsroom, eventually confirming that 17 people had died. At the same time, a team of reporters and photographers headed to Branson. That night, reporters also began investigating what went wrong, and at 6:45 the next morning, less than 12 hours after the accident, The Star published its first investigative story on the incident.
  • Press & Sun-Bulletin (NY) environmental watchdog

    Two deep projects of environmental investigative reporting demonstrating the newsroom's commitment to deeply covering this subject. In each case, the subjects have a major impact on the Southern Tier of New York State. The projects appeared in Binghamton but also were published by our sister papers in the Southern Tier (Elmira Star-Gazette and The Ithaca Journal).
  • A Collaborative Investigative Reporting Initiative

    The Georgia News Lab is an award-wining investigative reporting collaborative. Its mission is to train a new generation of investigative journalists and help increase diversity in newsrooms. The project is a partnership between four of the top college journalism programs in Georgia (the University of Georgia, Georgia State University, Morehouse College, and Clark Atlanta University) and two of the dominant news outlets in the Southeast (the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and WSB-TV, an ABC affiliate). Through this unique collaboration, students learn advanced reporting techniques, work side by side with professional reporters, produce major investigative stories, and prepare for careers in investigative journalism. http://www.wsbtv.com/news/news/local/student-project-leads-ethics-investigation-subpoen/nm8r6/
  • Dirty Air Duct Cleaners Exposed

    After complaints kept coming into our newsroom about underhanded tactics by an air duct cleaning company, News 4 decided to check out the company. Victims told News 4, the men who came to their homes for an advertised $55 coupon cleaning used scare tactics to get senior citizens to pay hundreds if not thousands of dollars extra. So we set up an undercover bait house to catch them in the act.
  • The News Sorority: Diane Sawyer, Katie Couric, Christiane Amanpour—and the (Ongoing, Imperfect, Complicated) Triumph of Women in TV News

    For decades, women battered the walls of the male fortress of television journalism. After fierce struggles, three women—Diane Sawyer, Katie Couric, and Christiane Amanpour—broke into the newsroom’s once impenetrable “boys’ club.” These extraordinary women were not simply pathbreakers, but wildly gifted journalists whose unique talents—courage and empathy, competitive drive and strategic poise—enabled them to climb to the top of the corporate ladder and transform the way Americans received their news. Drawing on exclusive interviews with their colleagues and intimates from childhood on, The News Sorority crafts a lively and exhilarating narrative that reveals the hard struggles and inner strengths that shaped these women and powered their success.
  • A Deadly Explosion

    A major explosion at a fertilizer plant in West, Texas, on April 17, 2013 killed 15, people including a dozen first responders. More than 200 people were injured and a small Central Texas farming community was left devastated. Though West is 200 miles away from Houston, the Chronicle immediately marshaled forces from all corners of the newsroom on this major story. Our goal quickly was to dig deep and uncover why the explosion happened and what could have been done to prevent it. We pulled in our investigative team, our environmental reporter, our science reporter, our Austin bureau, a columnist and several others on this story.