Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "non-profits" ...

  • Haaretz Investigation: Israeli Corporations Gave Millions to West Bank Settlements

    In this investigative project, Blau looks into how tax-exempt dollars raised in the U.S. end up sustaining illegal Jewish settlements in the West Bank—in direct contravention of longstanding U.S. policy. He systematically analyzed the financial files and tax filings of dozens of American non-profits and their partners in Israel. In an on-going series of stories published by Haaretz, Blau reported that these U.S.-based groups funneled more than $220 million to Jewish settlements during the five-year period between 2009-2013. He found that the money is being spent on everything from new air conditioning units in settlement housing to support payments for the families of convicted Jewish terrorists. By painstakingly tracing, documenting and reporting on the fund-raising and spending of these groups, Blau’s project sheds new light on America's complicated relationship with one of its closest allies. It has stirred heated debate and thoughtful discussion in this country and Israel, including a prominent mention in The New York Times editorial pages and an op-ed (written by Blau) in The Washington Post. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BVmWgzpAXX0 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0XGsd1LreCY https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JyQ9xBbDbrw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ACKIAMMK0OY
  • We Sell Houses (and Sometimes Ruin Lives)

    Scott Wizig is a Houston-based real estate king with an appalling track record in Houston, Buffalo, and Baltimore. Houston Press first reported on Wizig in 2004, after he was run out of Buffalo. They decided to follow up on him in 2014 after a group of community non-profits in Baltimore sued him for sitting on dozens of vacant, blighted homes that were deemed health and safety hazards. The Texas Department of Savings and Mortgage Lending appears to be the only Texas entity keeping an eye on Wizig, but even though he's repeatedly violated disclosure laws, the penalties are a pittance. Wizig also has exploited flaws in county record-keeping and eviction courts that have allowed him to foreclose on property he doesn't really own.
  • What the Federal Communications Commission’s political ad files tell us about the influence of money on politics — and what’s left out of those files

    The Citizens United decision by the Supreme Court has led to a proliferation of political groups, thinly disguised as non-profits, that don’t surface on many radar screens. They don’t have to file their contributions or most of their spending the the Federal Election Commission and any accounting they deliver to the IRS comes years after the election they worked to influence. To help uncover the political agendas behind this dark money, the Sunlight Foundation created Political Ad Sleuth, a tool that helps surface information from the one place that these groups still must leave a paper trail — the TV stations where they buy their ads.
  • Where Have All the Lawyers Gone?

    “Where Have All the Lawyers Gone?” identifies the shortage of affordable and pro bono legal services in Santa Barbara County and the impact that shortage has on society’s most vulnerable segments such as the homeless and working poor, especially in dealing with civil rights abuses, law enforcement issues, domestic violence, evictions and other legal issues that compound into bigger problems without accessible legal help. The story found that only about one-third of the legal needs of the county’s poor (14 percent of the county’s population lives under the poverty line) were being met. Although the California State Bar recommends that firms provide 50 hours of pro bono work a year, lawyers in the area admitted “there’s never been a culture of pro bono” in the area, and the firms that do participate are more likely to work with non-profits than poor individuals. An investigation revealed a glaring deficit in pro bono and affordable legal care in a town with more than its fair share of nonprofits and foundations dedicated to social issue
  • Culture Shock

    An investigation into the abuse of high school foreign exchange students by their host parents; and of the State Department’s ineffective oversight of this popular program. This two-part investigative report explores the lucrative industry of foreign exchange programs, most of which are large non-profits that report tens of millions in revenue, but don’t take the necessary steps to protect vulnerable teens. Over the course of eight months, producers interviewed victims around the world who said they were sent back to their home countries in shame at their own expense, with no hope of justice for the perpetrators. Many said their stories were brushed under the rug, and they received no help or support from the State Department.
  • Positive

    "The state of Illinois has increased its HIV spending by tens of millions of dollars-creating two new grant programs designed to combat the epidemic among African Americans. One of the grant programs was mismanaged and much of the funding does not target the highest risk population." Furthermore, the health department and non-profits were either understaffed or waiting for the funds to be received before they could treat anyone.
  • Mall School

    A Team 4 hidden camera investigation exposed a system that allows disruptive students to get the same diploma as other children, even though they only have to put in half the number of hours. Many of the schools they attend are run by private non-profits that are not required to have certified teachers. The students only have to spend 15 hours a week in the classroom, which is about half as much as regular students. And when it's time to graduate, they get a diploma from their home high school, just like other students.
  • NOAH Housing Program Investigation

    WWL-TV's 50 part investigation into a non-profit City of New Orleans agency revealed a post-Hurricane Katrina house gutting program designed for the poor and elderly may have been a scheme to funnel money to contractors. The investigation showed homes the non-profit claimed to have gutted using federal dollars, but the work was never done. Through extensive research, the WWL-TV team also found significant links between the highest paid contractors and the executive director of the non-profit. And one contractor was even linked to the city's mayor, Ray Nagin.
  • Hurricane Giveaway

    The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)kept tens of millions of dollars worth of new household supplies meant for Katrina victims stored in FEMA warehouses for two years. In early 2008, the agency decided the items were no longer needed and declared them surplus, even though agencies that help hurricane victims told CNN they desperately needed those types of items. The supplies ended up with federal and state agencies, but not Katrina victims. The investigation revealed the groups that are helping rehouse Katrina victims did not know these items existed. Furthermore, CNN discovered a serious disconnect between FEMA and the states, as well as within states themselves. Louisiana's surplus agency passed on taking any of the surplus items because the director said he was never told they were still needed. Mississippi, on the other hand, took the supplies and gave them to state prisons and other agencies, but not to non-profits helping Katrina victims. Those non-profits told CNN they never knew these items were available.
  • Hearts, Minds and Dollars: In an Unseen Front in the War on Terrorism, America is Spending Millions...To Change the Very Face of Islam

    This investigation revealed that the Bush Administration has approved a classified strategy to influence the future of Islam, and that conflicts within the Muslim faith are now considered a matter of "national security" to the United States. In at least two dozen countries, the U.S. government is funding Muslim imams, Islamic radio and TV shows, Muslim think tanks, political workshops and other programs that promote moderate Islam ideas.