Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "nonprofit" ...

  • Tarnished Brass

    In the name of protecting men and women in uniform, states across the country have made it nearly impossible to identify dangerous law enforcement officers with a track record of violence and other misdeeds. Records detailing their misconduct often are filed away, rarely seen by anyone outside of the department. Police unions and their political allies have worked to put special protections in place ensuring some records are shielded from public view, or even destroyed. A national tracking system for backgrounding officers is incomplete and not available to the public. More than two years ago, USA TODAY and its network of newsrooms across the nation set out to change that. More than two dozen reporters began collecting public records from the communities they covered and beyond. Also contributing substantially to the record-gathering was the Invisible Institute, a nonprofit journalism organization in Chicago that focuses on issues around policing tactics and criminal justice. We pieced together lists of decertified officers in more than 40 states. We collected logs and paper records related to 110,000 internal affairs investigations. We gathered information on 14,000 lawsuits against departments and fought to obtain so-called Brady lists, documenting officers flagged for lying and other misdeeds. Then we scoured story archives from our newsrooms and others to piece together the most comprehensive list of police misconduct cases ever built.
  • SF Chronicle: Risky Retreats

    An expose of the questionable, potentially dangerous methods that have been employed for decades at immersive, days-long “leadership” retreats held for high school teens across the U.S.
  • NYT: Cashing in On Cancer

    Conflicts riddle Memorial Sloan Kettering. Top doctors and executives benefit from lucrative side deals. Its staff feels betrayed, its mission is tainted.
  • Give and Take

    The Give and Take series is an exhaustive investigation into Vermont's nonprofit organizations. They employ nearly one in five of the state's workers, but get little scrutiny. We combined shoe-leather reporting and data journalism to uncover a series of surprising stories that looked at compensation, fundraising, gaming, lobbying and more.
  • Center for Responsive Politics: Tracking Trump’s ‘Dark Money’ Networks

    CRP’s series of investigations using data from FCC political ad records, tax documents and other resources to piece together a network of nonprofits supporting President Donald Trump’s agenda revealed that the Trump campaign funneled money to ad buyers alleged to have facilitated an illegal coordination scheme routing funds through a previously unreported shell company. Our research also identified exclusive financial information about groups and individuals tied to a mysterious LLC that made a $1 million donation to the inaugural committee.
  • Why is it ‘easy’ to steal from youth sports?

    Our investigation exposed how a prominent youth sports league that went to the Little League World Series was being ripped off by adult leaders. When we looked statewide, we found gaping loopholes in youth sport finances.
  • ADG: Milking Medicaid

    A Missouri-based nonprofit became Arkansas' largest provider of Medicaid-funded mental health services by milking a flawed system that has drawn the attention of federal prosecutors — and resulted in the convictions of several former lawmakers for public bribery and conspiracy.
  • The University of Louisville Foundation Bought An Empty Factory In Oklahoma—Because A Donor Asked

    Reporter Kate Howard revealed how the University of Louisville’s nonprofit fundraising arm bought an abandoned factory in Oklahoma at the behest of a major donor. The multi-layered $3.47 million-dollar transaction had no academic purpose, did not result in any revenue for the organization and appeared to be an ethical breach and tax code violation.
  • Dollars for Docs

    ProPublica first published Dollars for Docs, our comprehensive database of payments to doctors made by pharmaceutical companies for speaking, consulting, etc., in 2010. Millions of people have looked up their doctors, and hundreds of news organizations have used the data to tell important investigative stories. But it was only this year that, thanks to some painstaking work, we were able to match pharmaceutical payments with prescribing habits. And our findings were dispositive: Doctors who take payments tend to prescribe more brand-name drugs. Moreover, thousands of doctors who have had disciplinary actions against them by their state licensing boards are still getting pharma payments, and a greater share of physicians who work at for-profit hospitals take payments compared to those working at nonprofit or government facilities. https://projects.propublica.org/docdollars/ https://projects.propublica.org/graphics/d4d-hospital-lookup
  • Home Sweet Hustle

    For 15 years, the Portland nonprofit Give Us This Day occupied a unique place among foster-care agencies in the state of Oregon. Its four group homes served the most troubled, challenging kids in the state—children who had been sexually abused, starved, beaten and abandoned. It was the state’s only African-American-run foster care agency, a distinction that made it especially valuable to the state agency that manages housing for foster children, the Oregon Department of Human Services. The executive director of Give Us This Day, Mary Holden, was lauded as a human-rights champion. Give Us This Day was also unique in how leniently it was regulated by state officials. The state turned a blind eye to more than 1,000 police reports at foster homes run by Give Us This Day. It regularly paid large cash advances to the provider—something no other foster-care agency requested so regularly. And the Department of Human Services ignored years of allegations that Give Us This Day neglected children.