Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "nuclear" ...

  • Santa Fe New Mexican and ProPublica: Half-life

    The series Half-life, a partnership between the Santa Fe New Mexican and ProPublica, explored health and safety conditions for nuclear workers at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The says it has complied with federal workers’ safety rules since the mid-1990s, but The New Mexican and ProPublica found thousands of lab workers have filed benefits claims for cancer, and hundreds more have died, as a result of work done in the last two decades — a generation in which nuclear work conditions were supposed to be safe. Reporting found these workers face steep hurdles and are more frequently denied benefits than older generations. The Department of Energy has also rarely held Los Alamos contractors accountable for safety issues and has taken steps to limit independent oversight of safety conditions at federal nuclear sites nationwide.
  • America’s Chernobyl?: Inside the Most Toxic Place in the Nation

    In the course of a six-month investigation, the NBC News Investigative Unit discovered that numerous workers are sick and some have died at a Department of Energy nuclear site, and documented allegations from workers that the US government is covering up the danger. Their report on NBC’s Today Show prompted legislative action and raised larger questions about the ability of the federal government to store some of its most dangerous waste.
  • The Human Toll of Hanford's Dirty Secrets

    "The Human Toll of Hanford’s Dirty Secrets" exposed that in 2016 an unprecedented number of Hanford nuclear workers became ill after breathing toxic chemical vapors emanating from nuclear waste, while the federal government sat back and did little to remedy the crisis. We showed that instead of taking action to protect its workers, officials from the U.S. Department of Energy, Hanford’s operator, waged a cover up campaign, denied any problem existed, and even punished workers who insisted on better health protections.
  • America’s atomic vets: ‘We were used as guinea pigs – every one of us’

    Atomic veterans feel abused, neglected and forgotten by the government and a country that exposed them to unforeseen risks. In the decades since the nuclear tests, many have suffered ailments such as cancer and blame the radiation. https://www.retroreport.org/video/atomic-vets/ https://www.arcgis.com/apps/MapJournal/index.html?appid=4481099eafd746ff8e79bb13a6596e79
  • 50 Years since the Chinese Cultural Revolution and North Korea: Does the Hydrogen Bomb Test Signal the North Korean Version of the Cultural Revolution?

    North Korea ran a hydrogen bomb test in January, 2016. Some think this signaled the start of Kim Jong-Un’s version of the Cultural Revolution because China’s Cultural Revolution began around the time of their nuclear bomb test in 1964 and their hydrogen bomb test in 1966. The Chinese Cultural Revolution was a sort of power struggle by Mao Zedong where he used the power of the public to get rid of his opponents within the Communist Party and climb back to the top over a period of 10 years starting in 1966. Chinese society ended up with deep scars from hatred and vengeance because of it. For the 50th year anniversary of the Chinese Cultural Revolution, we explore the current state of North Korea’s Kim Jong-Un’s regime, which is carrying out deep-rooted idolization tactics internally while running nuclear weapons and missile tests externally, and try to predict the future of North Korea.
  • Almighty

    A riveting, chilling tale of how a group of ragtag activists infiltrated one of the most secure nuclear-weapons sites in the United States, told alongside a broader history of America's nuclear stewardship, from the early stages of the Manhattan Project to our country's never-ending investment in nuclear weaponry.
  • Nuclear Risks

    The Obama administration has waged an international campaign to lock down nuclear explosive materials over the past seven years, to stem the risk that a terrorist might detonate a bomb in New York, Washington, or elsewhere. But three countries in particular have proved immune to U.S. pressures for better safeguards: South Africa, Russia, and India. Our deep investigations into their nuclear activities laid bare a toxic mix of ineptitude, nationalism, and greed – and not just in foreign capitals – that keeps the world at risk.
  • Perils of Pantex

    An in-depth look at the federal program to compensate nuclear assembly plant workers in Amarillo was sparked after a controversial strike by workers -- the first in decades. Reporter Yamil Berard was sent to the scene as the strike was unfolding, only to bring back real stories about how the nation's program to compensate irradiated workers has failed to reach them before many die or become gravely ill. Berard also snapped the front page photo that ran with the package of stories and video.
  • Irradiated

    McClatchy reported for the first time that the push to win the Cold War left a legacy of death on American soil: At least 33,480 former nuclear workers who received compensation are dead. The death toll is more than four times the number of American casualties in the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.
  • Nuclear Black Market Seeks IS Extremists

    The AP investigation found that a remote corner of Eastern Europe has become a thriving marketplace for nuclear material aimed at extremists in the Middle East. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lBCi3lyftvo