Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "nurses" ...

  • Unlicensed, Unpunished

    A single tip led the investigative team at Denver7 to uncover unlicensed, untrained and often unpunished health care workers diagnosing and treating vulnerable, sick and disadvantaged Coloradans. The team’s work led to criminal investigations, forced Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper to intervene in the matter directly, and prompted state regulators to rewrite and reprioritize their policies. It represents a textbook case of journalists holding the powerful accountable by identifying fundamental problems in the institutions designed to keep consumers safe. Hickenlooper credited Denver7 for "actually making the community safer."
  • Texas Tribune: Dangerous Deliveries

    The Texas Tribune's Dangerous Deliveries project revealed how state lawmakers squandered opportunities to help more women access life-saving services, and how that fed the state's crisis-level maternal mortality rate for black women. And it underscored the critical nature of the problem by telling the stories of women like Sable Swallow, an uninsured waitress who was released from the hospital after giving birth even though she told nurses she had a terrible headache. After she left the hospital, the 25-year-old had a stroke.
  • Fueling the Fire: Dave Repsher

    Dave Repsher burned in post-helicopter crash fire in 2015, because the system designed to protect flight nurses and other helicopter passengers failed. Three years later, KUSA-TV's "Fueling the Fire" investigation changed that system by inspiring a change in federal law.
  • She Says

    WFAE’s She Says is an investigative podcast series that followed the story of a sexual assault survivor in Charlotte, NC and the long and difficult process of finding justice. Over the course of the series, award-winning WFAE reporter/host, Sarah Delia and reporter Alex Olgin investigated how our criminal justice system handles sexual assault cases on a local and national level. In addition to conversations with the sexual assault survivor at the heart of this story, the podcast features interviews with current and former law enforcement, specialized nurses, DNA experts, and other sexual assault survivors.
  • Minnesota's Graduation Gap

    MPR News set out to delve into an underreported fact -- that Minnesota’s high school graduation rates for students of color rank among the very worst in the nation -- and ended up making a profound discovery: Minnesota devotes less to non-classroom student support than any state. The category includes guidance counselors, social workers, nurses and mental health counselors, attendance staff and other positions that education experts says are key to keeping students at risk of dropping out of school on the path to graduations. The link between support spending and graduation rates appears to be stronger than other oft-mentioned factors to explain low rates for students of color. http://www.mprnews.org/story/2016/06/01/grad-gap-highlights
  • Vaccine Glass

    Vaccine maker Sanofi Pasteur discovered tiny pieces of glass in batches of a vaccine intended for babies. But Sanofi did not issue a recall. Rather, it allowed doctors and nurses throughout the country to continue injecting babies with glass for another year and a half.
  • Imposter Nurses

    A months-long I-Team 8 investigation uncovered serious problems with Indiana's professional licensing system. Their stories exposed a system filled with weak internal controls and lax security that allowed for nurses' identities to be stolen. Through a series of open records requests, interviews with victims and old-fashioned gumshoe reporting, this investigative series exposed impostor nurses and questioned state officials. It also prompted the state to make sweeping changes to its online licensing system, which now provides increased security measures to more than 100,000 nurses in Indiana along with 30+ other professions overseen by the agency.
  • Derby Pain Clinic's High Prescribing Of Cancer Drug Extends Beyond Nurse

    Culling and analyzing newly released data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, C-HIT Senior Writer Lisa Chedekel found an interesting prescribing pattern: four nurse practitioners, all affiliated with a tiny Derby pain clinic, prescribed nearly all of the state's Medicare spending for the opioid painkiller Subsys. The nurses were responsible for 279 prescriptions for Subsys, at a cost of $2.3 million in 2014. Nationally, only 10 nurse practitioners prescribed Subsys - with the majority of prescriptions written by doctors.
  • Minnesota's Graduation Gap

    MPR News set out to delve into an underreported fact -- that Minnesota’s high school graduation rates for students of color rank among the very worst in the nation -- and ended up making a profound discovery: Minnesota devotes less to non-classroom student support than any state. The category includes guidance counselors, social workers, nurses and mental health counselors, attendance staff and other positions that education experts says are key to keeping students at risk of dropping out of school on the path to graduations. http://www.mprnews.org/story/2016/06/01/grad-gap-highlights
  • Ghost Panels

    The VA continues to struggle to deliver timely, quality, healthcare to veterans despite the publicity and subsequent reforms initiated by the 2014 scandal. Case in point:The VA medical system in St. Cloud, Minnesota. It's where 30 year old Ross Cameron bounced from one physician to another as he desperately tried to get help for a deep depression and PTSD. He wife says he never got the full attention he needed. Then one day he took his own life by driving into a tree at a hundred miles an hour. The St. Cloud VA is also where Doug Larson nearly died because a provider made a huge mistake. This series of reports documents the turmoil within the hospital which triggered an exodus of physicians and nurses, and the impact the staffing shortages are having on veterans healthcare.