Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "nypd" ...

  • The Daily News: The Capricious Hand of NYPD Discipline

    The New York City Police Department has long been a target of complaints from rand-and-file police officers who insist that high-ranking police officials meddle in and manipulate cases to protect favored officers and punish those in disfavor. This Daily News investigation uncovered evidence of failings within the system that led to the New York City Police Department forming a panel to review the system and make recommendations based on its findings.
  • The Daily News: Detective Do-Little

    The Daily News’ investigation into Detective Thomas Rice exposed that he was fabricating fake witness names and addresses and repeatedly using them to close grand larceny cases on a significant scale in the Ozone Park section of Queens. Instead of being fired, Rice was transferred to another precinct, docked just 20 vacation days, and allowed to keep his detective rank and salary including overtime, while running his snow blowing and power washing company on the side with NYPD approval.
  • BuzzFeed News: The NYPD’s Secret Files

    BuzzFeed News reporters Kendall Taggart and Mike Hayes broke open one of the most closely guarded secrets in US policing: how the NYPD, the largest department in the country, allows officers who commit serious offenses to keep their jobs, their pensions, and their immense power over New Yorkers’ lives.
  • The Education of Edwin Raymond

    For a cover story in the New York Times Magazine, Investigative Fund reporter Saki Knafo uses exclusive, secretly recorded audio from one officer, Edwin Raymond, to expose the NYPD’s rigid insistence on fulfilling arrest quotas — and the racial biases behind them — despite public denials that such a quota system exists. The story sparked a follow-up investigation by NBC New York and coverage by several other outlets. Ultimately, the story resulted in the promotion of the whistleblowing officer.
  • NYPD Inc.

    In the wake of a massive corruption scandal in the New York City Police Department, WNYC investigated the outside finances of top NYPD officials. The reporting found numerous top cops earn money on the side with little oversight. Some of these side jobs and investments appear to be conflicts of interest, setting a bad example for the rank and file, and helping create a culture where corruption can breed.
  • Nuisance Abatement

    An examination of how the New York Police Department has used the little-known nuisance abatement law to threaten thousands of businesses and homes with yearlong closures.
  • Incredible Cops

    This three-part series -- part of WNYC's ongoing NYPD Bruised project -- examined how often NYPD officers lie, what the department does about it and the overall impact on the criminal justice system. WNYC identified more than 120 officers with a documented credibility issue in the past decade. Many stayed on the street where they continued to make arrests. Their word -- in sworn statements -- put people in prison. Defendants often never learn if the officer accusing them of a crime has a history of lying despite a constitutional right to such information. WNYC also found the NYPD and prosecutors have failed to make simple fixes to address the problem. As part of the series, WNYC produced a first-of-its-kind map and chart showing the laws and court precedents governing disclosure of police disciplinary records in all 50 states. http://www.wnyc.org/story/police-misconduct-records/
  • NYPD Rotten

    Following the death of Eric Garner during an arrest for selling loose cigarettes, WNYC took a look at the NYPD's policing in minority communities. They found the death of Eric Garner is not necessarily an anomaly. Rather, it is the cost of a crime reduction strategy that prioritizes the aggressive policing of low-level offenses in a department that spends a lot of energy looking for crime trends but has shown little interest in rooting out brutal cops.
  • Broken Windows

    “Beyond Broken”: The number of summonses issued each year has soared since broken windows was implemented in the early 1990s — from 160,000 in 1993 to a peak of 648,638 in 2005 — making ticket writing for low-level offenses the single most frequent activity of NYPD officers, far surpassing felony and misdemeanor arrests combined. Roughly 81% of the 7.3 million people hit with summonses between 2001 and 2013 were black and Hispanic. And the top 15 precincts with the highest rate of summonses have a population that is 75% or more black and Hispanic. They spoke to nearly 170 people waiting in line at the city’s three summons courts. Although some admitted guilt, many said they felt targeted by officers looking to write tickets, as if their neighborhood were under “martial law.”
  • They Died At The Hands of Cops

    Following a Staten Island grand jury’s decision on Dec. 3, 2014 to not indict the officer involved in the death of Eric Garner, the New York Daily News set out to determine just how often NYPD officers had suffered criminal repercussions for killing another person. With protests mounting, the demand for answers in our community was great. The newspaper marshaled its projects team, two senior courts reporters and a police reporter to answer this key question as quickly as possible. The paper’s findings — that NYPD officers had killed at least 179 people while on duty over the past 15 years, and that indictments had been brought in just three cases, leading to one conviction and no jail time — stunned the city and became an integral part of the larger debate over how these cases should be prosecuted.