Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "ocean" ...

  • OCCRP: Paradise Leased: The Theft of the Maldives

    Maldives tourism isn’t all swaying palm trees and white sand beaches. The truth is something far uglier. Thanks to a trove of leaked files, OCCRP reporters have uncovered the details of an audacious multi-million dollar scheme that saw dozens of Maldivian islands leased out to developers in no-bid deals — and the money then stolen. While local tycoons and international investors cashed in, the people of this island paradise in the Indian Ocean saw precious little. The revelations also include fresh evidence that implicates the Maldives’ authoritarian president, Abdulla Yameen, in the scandal.
  • CNBC: Oceans of Crime

    This is a crime story, set in the most open and lawless place on earth – the ocean. The perpetrators traffic in an illegal product – seafood. Their front-line workers are literally slaves. And almost anyone who buys salmon, canned tuna, or pet food is helping to fund this outlaw industry, whether they realize it or not. In this documentary about illegal fishing, CNBC illustrates the often shocking, unethical path much of our seafood takes from the water to our dinner plates, and what is being done to curb the often monumental abuses that occur along the way. Because illegal fishing is both a human rights and an environmental issue, CNBC’s goal was to explore the entire supply process and introduce all those involved – fishermen suffering abuse, the perpetrators, the would-be rescuers and enforcers, and the consumers who make it all possible, whether they know it or not.
  • Former NOAA official pushed policies that benefit his company

    This story took a look at the largest company that provides at-sea watchdogs to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It found that the president of the company was part of an influential group that helped convince the government to use catch shares, which require more watchdogs -- and thus more money for his company. It also found that the company has a grant to assess the success of catch shares, a potential conflict-of-interest when the company benefits from the program.
  • The Outlaw Ocean

    Lawlessness reigns on the high seas, with kidnapping, indenturing and even killing among a largely invisible global work force, and environmental crimes rampant as porous laws, questions about jurisdiction and lack of enforcement have failed to stem abuses. http://graphics8.nytimes.com/video/players/offsite/index.html?videoId=100000003630578 http://www.nytimes.com/video/world/100000003697113/five-men-killed-at-sea.html http://www.nytimes.com/video/world/asia/100000003660720/drugged-kidnapped-and-enslaved.html http://graphics8.nytimes.com/video/players/offsite/index.html?videoId=100000003675414 http://graphics8.nytimes.com/video/players/offsite/index.html?videoId=100000003675416
  • FEMA's Fickle Flood Maps

    We've read for years now about anger at the high costs to property owners of changes to FEMA's flood maps, but we hadn't read this before: As homeowners around the nation protest skyrocketing premiums for federal flood insurance, the Federal Emergency Management Agency has quietly moved the lines on its flood maps to benefit hundreds of oceanfront condo buildings and million-dollar homes, according to an analysis of federal records by NBC News. Reporters Bill Dedman and Miranda Leitsinger produced a three-part series showing that FEMA had approved those revisions -- removing more than 500 waterfront properties from the highest-risk flood zone and saving the owners as much as 97 percent on the premiums they pay into the financially strained National Flood Insurance Program – even as owners of homes and businesses far from a water source were being added to the maps asked to pay far more for their coverage.
  • Water's Edge--The crisis of rising sea levels

    Few subjects in the news stir as much controversy as climate change. In the U.S., the threat of rising levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, the contribution of human activity to that threat, and even whether the climate is changing at all are fiercely debated and politically polarizing. Inconclusive science only further polarizes the issue. Lost in all the vitriol is one aspect of a changing environment that is not debatable: rising seas. Tidal waters worldwide have climbed an average of 8 inches over the past century. Yet the volume of journalism documenting rising seas as an immediate, observable phenomenon has been scant; more typically, news media have relied on extrapolations and predictions to create frightening scenarios far in the future. Reuters set out to change that in its series “Water’s Edge: the Crisis of Rising Sea Levels.” For this yearlong project, Reuters did its own science. We collected and analyzed vast stores of hard data and combined the results with on-the-ground reporting to produce stories unique in their treatment of rising seas not as a future threat, but as a troubling reality for millions of people living along the U.S. coast.
  • Shell 'Beer Can' Crushed

    A KUOW Freedom of Information Act request revealed the severity of a maritime accident that the world's largest energy company and the U.S. government sought to downplay or avoid comment on. News outlets from Alaska to England, including the New York Times, Financial Times and Hearst Newspapers have cited the KUOW scoop in their ensuing coverage. Our story has also resulted in Congressional and Interior Department inquiries into the accident involving equipment Royal Dutch Shell planned to use in support of oil drilling in the Arctic Ocean.
  • Plunder in the Pacific

    "Plunder in the Pacific," an eight-country investigation, revealed how Asian, European and Latin American fleets have devastated what was once one of the world’s great fish stocks. Jack mackerel in the South Pacific has decreased from around 30 million tons to less than three tons in just two decades. We found that national interests and geopolitical rivalry for six years blocked efforts to ratify a regional fisheries management organization that could impose binding regulations to rescue jack mackerel from further collapse. Bound only by voluntary restrictions, fleets competed in what amounted to a free-for-all in no man’s water.
  • Oil Spill

    The New York Times' continuing coverage of the Gulf Oil Spill documents the vulnerabilities, weaknesses, loopholes, and oversight that led the disaster.
  • "Barnegat Bay Under Stress"

    This series of stories investigates the gradual demise of Barnegat Bay, the "largest coastal estuary" in New Jersey. Reporters found that thousands of pounds of fertilizer and other "land-borne pollution" is flowing into the bay. The investigative series resulted in Gov. Chris Christie shutting down a nearby nuclear power plant and earmarking millions of dollars for "special environmental control funding."