Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "operations" ...

  • Bribery Division

    The Bribery Division, an international investigation into Latin America’s largest construction company, reveals fresh evidence of hundreds of millions of dollars in suspicious payments linked to major infrastructure projects. Brazilian multinational Odebrecht has been implicated in a cash-for-contracts scandal that the U.S. Department of Justice has described as “the largest foreign bribery case in history.” The Bribery Division investigation unveils dramatic new information in taking readers inside the belly of the beast: Odebrecht’s Division of Structured Operations, a specialized unit created for the primary purpose of managing the company’s graft. A team of more than 50 journalists across the Americas, led by ICIJ, examined more than 13,000 Odebrecht documents from a secret communication platform used by the Structured Operations unit. The team’s sprawling expose revealed Odebrecht’s cash-for-contracts operation was even bigger than the company had acknowledged to prosecutors and had involved prominent figures and massive public works projects not mentioned in the criminal cases or other official inquiries to date.
  • Toronto Star: Rise of Ghost Hotels

    The data investigation began with the question: Is Airbnb exacerbating Toronto's rental crisis by enabling short-term operations to flourish at the expense of long-term rental stock? We analyzed more than 20,000 Airbnb listings data scraped by independent third-party website insideairbnb.com. We also filed requests for documents on business incorporation to validate our findings about commercial operators.
  • The Texas Observer and Grist with The Investigative Fund: Too Big to Fine, Too Small to Fight Back

    Citgo refineries spew thousands of tons of chemicals into the air, degrading air quality and putting human health at risk. Despite Citgo's revenues hitting north of $40 billion, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality lets the company off easy. For her investigation in The Texas Observer, in partnership with Grist and The Investigative Fund, Naveena Sadasivam dug into how the TCEQ has fined corporate polluters $30 million for air violations, not much more than the $24 million imposed on gas stations, a significant percentage of which are owned by immigrants, just for record-keeping errors. The disparity between TCEQ's treatment of mom-and-pop operations versus large corporations favors those with money and power. The agency rarely punishes big polluters, often because of a legal loophole, and when it does levy a fine, lawyers negotiate big reductions in penalties. As a result, environmental advocates and small business owners say there's a fundamental unfairness at work with the way TCEQ treats the businesses it regulates.
  • The New Food Economy and The Intercept: Amazon employees and the safety net

    As food stamps go online in the coming years, Amazon is poised to collect a large proportion of sales from the $70-billion program. Yet our investigation found that in at least five states, the company's own employees are disproportionately reliant on the program to feed their families. We framed these findings in contrast to the vast subsidies states and local governments provide the company in exchange for "good" jobs. Months before the conclusion of Amazon’s HQ2 search prompted mainstream outlets to wonder whether or not the company’s presence really benefits the communities that compete to host its operations, our reporting revealed that taxpayers subsidize Amazon's expansion every step of the way. It remains to be seen whether or not those investments pay off.
  • The Daily News: New York City Housing Authority Expose

    The New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) repeatedly lied to deny the findings of a lengthy investigation by Daily News reporter Greg. B. Smith that uncovered fetid conditions at the 175,000 apartments in the country's largest housing authority. Once the cover-up was exposed, NYCHA entered into an unprecedented consent decree to allow a federal monitor to oversee its operations.
  • Rhino Horn Trafficking in Missouri

    A WDAF Fox 4 investigation revealed Macon, Missouri, was the backdrop for one of the largest rhino horn trafficking operations in the county – an operation that netted nearly $1 million dollars.
  • L.A. Times: In the Search for Drugs, a Lopsided Dragnet

    Since 2012, deputies in a specialized narcotics unit of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department have pulled over thousands of cars on a rural stretch of the 5 Freeway, California’s major north-south artery. A Times analysis of the unit’s traffic stops found Latino drivers are stopped and searched far more frequently than other motorists – a disparity that translated into thousands of innocent people being detained by deputies acting on little more than a hunch. In several cases, federal judges ruled deputies violated people’s constitutional rights. In response to The Times’ investigation, the Sheriff’s Department recently suspended the unit’s operations.
  • BuzzFeed News: American Mercenaries

    This was an 8-month investigation that uncovered a privately-run assassination program in Yemen run by American Special Operations veterans and reservists working as mercenaries. Hired by the United Arab Emirates, Americans were sent to kill civilian political leaders from an Islamist party. The team, paid millions of dollars, was made up of about a dozen veterans from the most combat-skilled units America has: former SEALS, former Delta Force, and even former CIA ground branch. It was led by a charismatic former French Foreign Legionnaire who lives in the US suburbs.
  • Austin American-Statesman: Unwatched

    Stories about children hurt or killed while in childcare pop up often enough that the Austin American-Statesman’s investigative team started to wonder: How safe are Texas child cares? The Statesman's investigative team dug into thousands of pages of state records, made more than 100 public information requests, and spoke with dozens of families, experts and state officials. We analyzed 40,000 day care violations and built a database showing that child care providers are often not paying attention when children get hurt and that hundreds of operations have been cited for failing to tell both parents and the state when children are hurt. We sought to give readers a comprehensive look at safety issues in the Texas day care system — a system that serves more than 1 million children every day.
  • Fatal Experiments

    Paolo Macchiarini has long been hailed as both a superstar surgeon and a revolutionizing researcher in the world of regenerative medicine. When he performed the world's first transplantation of a synthetic trachea seeded with stem cells in 2011, it seemed that modern medicine was one step closer to "the artificial man," where human organs could be produced in laboratories. But when the patients soon started dying, serious allegations of research fraud started to emerge against Macchiarini and his methods. At the same time, his operations were investigated by the police for suspected manslaughter. But Macchiarini was backed by the prestigious Karolinska Institute (home of the Nobel prize), which found that all in all he had done nothing wrong. Paolo seemed to be free of the accusations, that is until he let a team of investigative reporters into his world of the academic elite.