Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "paint" ...

  • Families complain of mold, lead paint, rats in military housing ahead of hearing

    In February, CBS News gained access to privatized housing at Ft. Meade, becoming the first national television network to go on to a military base to investigate issues within the U.S. military’s privatized housing program. Through our coverage, CBS News exposed problems with mold, insects and structural integrity covered up or ignored by private housing companies. This story led to a swift response from then-Secretary of the Army Mark Esper, who granted an exclusive on-camera interview with CBS News to outline how his department planned to respond.
  • Military.com: Aviators Kicked Out

    The U.S. military prides itself on its colorblind attitude to race and its increasing diversity. Why, then, does the field of naval aviation remain overwhelmingly white, and less diverse in some areas now than two decades ago? Three black aviators who share remarkably similar stories of getting expelled from the training pipeline say unconscious bias is to blame. These former trainees, some of whom remain in appeals with the Navy, say they're just as good as their white peers, and an instructor backs their assertions. Investigations, formal complaints, and a troubling aviation instructors' chat history paint a picture of an environment that dooms minority aviators from the moment they set foot on the flightline.
  • Democrat and Chronicle: Rochester food truck builder burns customers nationwide

    When reporters at the Democrat and Chronicle received a call from a distressed food truck owner who had been burned by a local food truck builder, a quick records check revealed a surprising tally of lawsuits and tax liens for what had been regarded as a prominent local business. That led to a six-month investigation that revealed a business in a downward spiral, bringing down customers across the country as they cut corners on workmanship and accepted deposits of $10,000 to $42,500 and strung customers along for months. The gripping narrative painted a sobering downside to the hot food truck industry.
  • CBS THIS MORNING: Methylene Chloride Consumer Alert

    CBS News initiated a multi-part investigation into the sale and use of deadly paint strippers containing the chemical methylene chloride. Over the course of the investigation, CBS News found that the EPA had delayed its report on methylene chloride despite numerous deaths caused by the toxic chemical.
  • Toxic City: Sick Schools

    Children in Philadelphia public schools endure environmental hazards -- deteriorated asbestos, damaged lead paint, festering mold and rodent droppings -- that deprive them of a healthy place to learn and thrive. In reaching our major findings, we conducted 175 scientific tests at 19 elementary schools at a cost of nearly $9,000, built a custom database to analyze more than 250,000 room-by-room environmental records, and interviewed more than 120 teachers, parents, students and experts.
  • Lead Kids

    Decades before there was lead in drinking water in Flint, Michigan that poisoned kids, there was lead paint in homes. Some of those victims received life-time payouts for their injuries from landlords who failed to clean up the problem. And now some of those same lead kids, are being enticed to sell that future cash stream for pennies on the dollar. As a result of this investigation, CBS News found that some of the lead paint victims were defrauded by unscrupulous companies looking to make a profit. In their reporting, they found that these lead paint victims, as adults, had limited capacity to understand what they were signing away because of the irreversible brain damage caused by exposure to lead paint as kids.
  • Noncompliant Hazardous Waste Facility

    A facility that handles hazardous wastes - including chemicals from auto repair shops, industrial plants and paint stores - before they're moved to permanent disposal sites has operated without a permit because of failures of the city and the company's owners.
  • Florida’s Foreclosure Crisis

    Florida homeowners are being steamrolled through foreclosure courts by overzealous judges, while others are left holding the bag for abandoned and unlivable homes, because state officials have placed expedience over the right to due process in an effort to clear a perceived backlog in court cases. The Center for Public Integrity interviewed dozens of homeowners, lawyers, judges and public officials, observed courtrooms, and examined databases and documents to paint a picture of a foreclosure crisis that persists years after the financial crisis. The project resulted in Wells Fargo, one of the biggest mortgage lenders, rehabbing dozens of abandoned homes it owns, and state officials looking at ways to make the state courts more responsive to the needs of homeowners.
  • Shock & Awe: Miami Cops Misuse Tasers, With Deadly Results

    This article exposes Taser abuse by police officers in Miami, Florida. On August 6, 2013, Miami Beach Police fatally tasered 18-year-old Israel Hernandez after catching him spray-painting graffiti on an abandoned McDonald's. Miami New Times reporter Michael E. Miller broke the story, and then followed it up with a dozen other articles on Hernandez's case. Miller compiled thousands of pages of records that showed local officers were overusing and misusing these devices, resulting in injuries and – in some cases – even death. His reporting showed cops often ignored their own departments' procedures on Taser use, yet were never held accountable.
  • Awash in Risk

    In the shadow of the American petrochemical industry, hundreds of workers perform a crucial, dangerous and utterly invisible task. They physically climb inside tanker trucks and rail tank cars and chemical barges to clean them out. The men, nearly all black and Latino, come in direct contact with fiercely corrosive chemical leftovers and fumes, often working with scrapers and razor blades to get every square inch of the insides clean. Some say they do so without so much as a mask. Many have died. Generating data from scratch, frequenting truck stops, knocking on doors and collecting obscure business sources, the Houston Chronicle provides a first instance look at this previously unknown industry, cross referencing every found workplace with OSHA records to paint a picture of a labor that has passed mostly under the radar.