Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "passengers" ...

  • Guns in Airports, Passengers Packing Heat

    2018 set a record for people trying to carry guns through airport TSA checkpoints. 4,239 guns were found in carry-on bags at airports across the country, that’s 12 guns every day. 86% of those guns were loaded. Our 11-month investigation focused on who was attempting to take firearms through security checkpoints and examined why there has been such a sharp increase in the numbers of weapons found in airports in recent years.
  • Fueling the Fire: Dave Repsher

    Dave Repsher burned in post-helicopter crash fire in 2015, because the system designed to protect flight nurses and other helicopter passengers failed. Three years later, KUSA-TV's "Fueling the Fire" investigation changed that system by inspiring a change in federal law.
  • CNN Investigates - Uber Sexual Assault

    CNN Investigates’ multi-part, five month-long reporting project focused on allegations of sexual assaults by drivers of the rideshare giant Uber. Uber pitches itself in advertising as a “safe ride home,” but CNN’s reporting found that in case after case across the country, Uber drivers prey on female passengers, and Uber’s background check process allowed thousands of convicted criminals to become drivers. CNN’s investigation led to safety changes in the Uber app, a change in the background check policy, and a change in Uber’s policy that forced sexual assault victims into arbitration and compelled them to sign non-disclosure agreements.
  • Dangerous Dollar Jitneys

    After scores of complaints, safety violations and a crash that killed an infant, WPIX went undercover and caught “dollar jitney” drivers committing dangerous acts behind the wheel: texting and talking on cell phones, illegally passing and speeding - endangering New York and New Jersey motorists, pedestrians and passengers. http://pix11.com/2015/11/20/pix11-investigation-exposes-dangerous-dollar-jitneys-traveling-ny-nj-roadways/ http://pix11.com/2015/11/23/pix11-investigation-sparks-police-probe-into-jitney-drivers-using-phones-behind-the-wheel/
  • Aura of Power

    Through a series of stories, CBC Edmonton's investigative unit revealed the abuse of public resources by former Alberta Premier Alison Redford. The series revealed the premier had secretly ordered herself a luxury penthouse, flew her daughter on government planes dozens of times, and employed a scheme to block passengers from government flights so she could fly alone with a chosen entourage.
  • KBS Panorama Disaster Prevention Documentary <Remember the Sewol >

    Was the Sewol tragedy really unavoidable? This program takes us back to the day when the Sewol took some 400 passengers from Incheon Port to Jeju Island. Based on the statements of all those involved, it turned out that the ferry – an old ferry imported from Japan and illegally renovated – disregarded the safety regulations to carry more freight. Greed was the underlying cause of this calamity.
  • Project: Point of View, Humans and Disasters

    There are three underlying factors in this tragedy that resulted in the loss of hundreds of lives. In numerous ferry incidents that occurred around the world in the last 150 years, captains and crewmembers have had a higher survival rate than passengers. When facing the risk of death, crewmembers put their own survival ahead of their duty to rescue passengers as shown in studies. Why did the passengers on the Sewol Ferry act too late to escape from the sinking ship? Why were announcements made over the loudspeakers that kept ordering passengers to stay calmly in their cabins up until the point when the ferry was leaning heavily to one side?
  • DC taxis for all? WUSA9 undercover video documents broken system and broken promises

    Working overnights and weekends for a year, undercover WUSA9 cameras documented repeated, blatant discrimination against black, blind, and wheel chair passengers and broken promises from the agency in charge to fix it. In response to the WUSA9 investigation, DC Taxicab Commission Chairman Ron Linton is battling a call for his resignation while at the same time bungling agency responses to each broadcast. The DC Office of Human Rights credited WUSA9 for promting its own investigation into Linton's response, the DC Taxicab Commission, and the DC Taxicab industry. Meantime, our cameras continue to document daily racism on the streets of the nation's capital where, in our tests, 25% to 33% of black passengers were ignored by drivers, who often were caught on tape stopping for white decoy passengers 100 feet down the street.
  • How NJ Transit Failed Sandy's Test

    On the weekend before Sandy thundered into New Jersey, transit officials studied a map showing bright green and orange blocks. On the map, the area where most New Jersey Transit trains were being stored showed up as orange – or dry. So keeping the trains in its centrally-located Meadows Maintenance Complex and the nearby Hoboken yards seemed prudent. And it might have been a good plan. Except the numbers New Jersey Transit used to create the map were wrong. If officials had entered the right numbers, they would have predicted what actually happened: a storm surge that engulfed hundreds of rail cars, some of them brand new, costing over $120 million in damage and thrusting the system’s passengers into months of frustrating delays. But the fate of NJ Transit’s trains – over a quarter of the agency’s fleet - didn’t just hang on one set of wrong inputs. It followed years of missed warnings, failures to plan, and lack of coordination under Governor Chris Christie, who has expressed ambivalence about preparing for climate change while repeatedly warning New Jerseyans not to underestimate the dangers of severe storms.
  • Money, Power and Transit

    This ongoing inewsource investigation into a public transit system that serves 12 million passengers a year by bus and rail exposed perils to public safety, mismanagement of millions of public dollars and perhaps most egregious: enduring bureaucratic arrogance in the face of public scrutiny. Over the course of a year, inewsource produced more than 30 stories, radio broadcasts, TV features, and interviews. We experimented with new levels of transparency in our reporting and storytelling. We spent thousands of dollars pursuing public information and battling regular retraction demands. The series drew from a multitude of inside sources, leaked documents, hard-fought public records, emails, and other materials to unearth the truth about what’s going wrong inside the San Diego’s North County Transit District. Our stories have drawn intense fire from the district’s legal department — all the while those responsible to the taxpayers and the transit riders have consistently refused to respond to interview requests or to answer specific written questions.