Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "pedestrian" ...

  • Walking While Black

    “Walking While Black,” a meticulously researched and powerful reporting project, showed Jacksonville's enforcement of pedestrian violations to be racially disproportionate. Using hard-won data from a variety of local and state agencies, Topher Sanders and Ben Conarck, both veterans of reporting in Jacksonville, showed the disparities across every category of pedestrian tickets in Duval County. They then found those ticketed, and chronicled the impact — on their driver’s licenses, on their credit ratings, on their day to day ability to work and raise families in a city notorious for its lack of adequate pedestrian infrastructure.
  • Miami Herald: FIU Bridge

    On March 15, an under-construction, 174-foot-long concrete pedestrian bridge collapsed on a busy road next to Florida International University's campus. Five people who by a cruel twist of fate happened to be driving under the bridge were instantly crushed to death. In addition, a worker standing on top of the structure, a joint project managed by both FIU and the state of Florida, was killed in the collapse. Several more people were injured. Herald reporters immediately rushed to the scene to report on the stunning accident. Following the initial coverage, a team of reporters worked for the rest of the year -- fighting for public records all the way -- to uncover why the bridge had fallen, who had oversight of the taxpayer-funded project, why the road below it remained open during crucial structural work and the impact on the families of the dead.
  • Rail Crossings Danger

    A CBC News investigation into Canada's top 25 most accident-prone railway crossings found wide-spread design flaws across the country. Some of the most dangerous railway crossings in Canada lack automated gate arms, protective pedestrian gates, advance warning signs, bells and flashing lights. Other deficiencies include poor sightlines for drivers, confusing road signs and overgrown bush. As well, CBC News learned Transport Canada does not routinely warn the public about all railway crossings that appear in its database of the country's 500 "highest risk" crossings.
  • Metro buses: Pedestrians in a blind spot?

    King County Metropolitan Transit District bus collisions with pedestrians grew substantially after schedules were tightened and drivers had less time to recover between trips. Collisions with walkers leaped 35 percent in the past four-plus years. And a group of accidents was disturbingly similar: A Metro bus manufactured by Orion turning left hit a pedestrian in a crosswalk. That model bus has a large pillar on the left-hand side of the windshield, making it difficult for the driver to see walkers while turning.
  • Dangerous Dollar Jitneys

    After scores of complaints, safety violations and a crash that killed an infant, WPIX went undercover and caught “dollar jitney” drivers committing dangerous acts behind the wheel: texting and talking on cell phones, illegally passing and speeding - endangering New York and New Jersey motorists, pedestrians and passengers. http://pix11.com/2015/11/20/pix11-investigation-exposes-dangerous-dollar-jitneys-traveling-ny-nj-roadways/ http://pix11.com/2015/11/23/pix11-investigation-sparks-police-probe-into-jitney-drivers-using-phones-behind-the-wheel/
  • Blood In The Streets

    The Orlando metropolitan region is a classic example of late 20th century-sprawl, lacking in comprehensive urban planning and built around available roads. The metropolis experienced explosive growth following the founding of Walt Disney World (1971), SeaWorld Orlando (1973) and Universal Orlando (1988.) Government agencies responded to the growing population's transportation needs primarily by making the existing roads wider and faster. By the 21st century it became apparent that pedestrians were never a significant part of the planning. It became apparent because so many of them were getting run down and killed, even though most people, it seemed, avoided walking. By almost all accounts Orlando had become the most dangerous city in the country for pedestrians. The Orlando Sentinel set out to explore the plight of pedestrians and the drivers who hit them, telling the stories of those killed or seriously injured, those who had to live with it, and the public institutions - the road agencies, police, hospitals and courts - that, ultimately, coped ineffectively with the carnage. To do so, we carefully analyzed highway patrol data on thousands of crashes and reviewed full crash investigation reports and court files on scores of them. We tracked down survivors, victims' families and drivers. And we used their stories (backed by volumes of data) to show how dangerous walking in Orlando had become.
  • Not all of Hinchey's earmarks live up to billing

    One of the leading politicians in central New York is longtime US Rep. Maurice Hinchey. He has been unapologetic and prolific crafting earmarks that steer federal funds into his sprawling district. Many in the Hudson Valley can see the results: a pedestrian bridge that spans the Hudson River, renovations for an historic opera house and help to at-risk youth. There are dozens and dozens of others. By one estimate, two years ago the senior Democrat was among the nation's top 12 earmarking members of Congress. But a review found his earmarks have not always lived up to billing. Money for solar energy companies that did not create hundreds of promised jobs. A presidential helicopter that was supposed to be built largely in Owego, NY, is scrapped, and was decried by President Obama and US Sen. John McCain, among others, as an extremely wasteful. Also not fulfilling promises was a military contractor where dozens of jobs were predicted. While Hinchey had been identified in the past as prolific with earmarks, even the past two years finding ways to work around Congress’ ostensible ban on earmarks, no one had gone back through the public record to examine on a large scale whether key projects lived up to promises. The students obtained and examined federal databases on earmarks, read the public record on pronouncements at the time the earmarks were issued, and identified key projects that did not live up to billing.
  • Dodging Dart

    “Des Moines Area Regional Transit travels 3.7 million miles a year”. Many people use the system to travel back and forth to work and school. These people haven’t had bad experiences, but fear for the pedestrians coming in the way of the bus. There have been “at least seven people hit by the bus in a little more than two years”. Little has been done to make the streets safer because it is difficult, when hiring, to set criteria for them.
  • Danger Behind the Wheel: Suspended Driver on Maine Roads

    "This series studied the dangers posed by drivers with suspended licenses; evaluated efforts in Maine to crack down on the problem; and looked at what other measures might help protect motorists and pedestrians. One key statistical conclusion was that when drivers with suspended licenses are involved in crashes, it's six times more likely that someone will die than when properly licensed drivers crash their vehicles."
  • Moving Targets

    Reporters at the Las Vegas Sun look into the high number of pedestrian and cyclist fatalities on Las Vegas roadways. Using data and statistics from the NHTSA and the National Center for Statistics and Analysis, the reporters discovered that the problem lies in roadway design, motorist carelessness, and lenient laws.