Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "podcast" ...

  • Uncover: Escaping NXIVM - CBC

    NXIVM calls itself a humanitarian community. Experts call it a cult. Uncover: Escaping NXIVM is an investigative podcast series about the group, its leader Keith Raniere and one woman's journey to get out and take the group down.
  • The New Republic and The Investigative Fund: Political Corruption and the Art of the Deal

    President Donald Trump has railed against the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, which makes it a crime for U.S. companies to bribe foreign officials or partner with others who are doing so. But reporter Anjali Kamat uncovered an extensive history of lawsuits, police inquiries and government investigations connected to the Trump family's real estate partners in India, reporting that appeared as the cover story of the April The New Republic and formed the basis of two episodes of Trump Inc., a podcast series from WNYC and ProPublica that digs deeply into the secrets of Trump's family business.
  • MSNBC: "Bag Man"

    This 7-episode documentary podcast series released in October 2018 dug into the scandal and resignation involving former Vice President Spiro T. Agnew in the Fall of 1973. The series featured extensive interviews with those involved, as well as months of in-depth research that brought to light aspects of the story that were unknown to the prosecutors at the time and that revealed the potentially criminal actions of high-ranking public officials, including not only a sitting President of the United States, but a future President, as well.
  • KPCC: Repeat

    KPCC’s “Repeat” is a serialized podcast that shows how one of the largest law enforcement agencies in the country, the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, investigates officers who shoot civilians. We found a system that is largely shielded from public scrutiny and raised questions about the secrecy of internal investigations.
  • Insight with John Ferrugia: Marijuana Murder?

    When Richard Kirk murdered his wife in 2014, the case was stunning. Recreational marijuana had been newly legalized in Colorado. Marijuana edibles were for sale and accessible. He bought one to try. And then he killed his wife, Kris. In this 35-minute podcast investigation, “Marijuana Murder?” radio producer Leigh Paterson and television reporter/producer Lori Jane Gliha worked together to obtain a long sought-after, exclusive interview with the killer and to explore new scientific research linking marijuana edibles to hallucinations and other psychiatric effects.
  • In The Dark Season 2

    In the Dark is an investigative podcast that raises profound questions about whether the criminal justice system in America is fair and just. Season Two investigates the case of Curtis Flowers, a black man on death row in Mississippi who has been tried six times for the same crime. Over 11 episodes, the product of more than a year’s worth of meticulous reporting and data analysis, In the Dark reveals what can happen when the power of a prosecutor goes unchecked.
  • Gladiator Podcast: Aaron Hernandez and Football Inc.

    Patriots star tight end Aaron Hernandez dazzled crowds with his spectacular athleticism, only to be implicated in one murder, then two others. He took his own life at age 27. Through documents and audio recordings, some never before made public, and interviews with key people who have never before spoken, the Globe’s Spotlight Team has compiled the story of a profoundly troubled young man and the ugly underside of America’s most popular sport. Its reporters produced a six-part print series and its first-ever multi-episode podcast where you can hear the voices – including that of Aaron Hernandez – that will bring the story alive.
  • CBC News - Missing and Murdered: Finding Cleo

    This submission is for a podcast with ten episodes. The submission includes the episodes, an audio trailer as well as a link to the podcast website where you can find other material such as photos and video and text stories and uploaded files of the episode transcripts (as supplementary material) On the surface, this is a true crime story trying to answer the question - what happened to Cleo Semaganis Nicotine? She and her siblings in the Cree Indigenous family were taken into government care in Saskatchewan, Canada in the 1970's and adopted into white families in Canada and the United States. The siblings re-connected as adults but can't find Cleo. They've heard that she ran away from a home in Arkansas and was murdered but they don't know if that is true. They want help to at least find where she is buried.
  • Boston Globe/Gladiator: Aaron Hernandez and Football Inc.

    Patriots star tight end Aaron Hernandez dazzled crowds with his spectacular athleticism, only to be implicated in one murder, then two others. He took his own life at age 27. Through documents and audio recordings, some never before made public, and interviews with key people who have never before spoken, the Globe’s Spotlight Team has compiled the story of a profoundly troubled young man and the ugly underside of America’s most popular sport. Its reporters produced a six-part print series and its first-ever multi-episode podcast where you can hear the voices – including that of Aaron Hernandez – that will bring the story alive.
  • Asylum Crackdown

    In her investigation “Chinatown Asylum Crackdown,” NPR’s Ailsa Chang shines a light on a never-before reported aspect of the Trump administration’s clampdown on the asylum system. Much of the news coverage on President Trump’s immigration policies has been focused on the White House’s efforts to turn away asylum-seekers at the border. What Chang reveals in her investigation for NPR’s Planet Money podcast is the Trump administration’s quiet operation to strip asylum status from immigrants who won it years ago. The people targeted in this sweeping review are Chinese immigrants – more than 13,000 of them. Many of them have been living in the U.S. for years with green cards and are now spending thousands of dollars defending their asylum cases in immigration court – years after winning asylum.