Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "polls" ...

  • The Myth of the Criminal Immigrant

    Since taking office, President Trump has repeatedly claimed that immigrants bring a tremendous amount of crime into America. He's wrong, and the proof is in the data. This visual piece examines and demonstrates the relationship between immigration and crime in American cities over the past 40 years. Readers can see for themselves that increased immigration does not accompany higher violent crime rates. In fact, immigration is more frequently associated with reduced crime. This is important work: as of 2017, Gallup polls show that almost half of Americans agree that immigrants make crime worse. This research is crucial to debunking the dangerous myth that immigrants lead to crime.
  • The Marshall Project: The Myth of the Criminal Immigrant

    Since taking office, President Trump has repeatedly claimed that immigrants bring a tremendous amount of crime into America. He's wrong, and the proof is in the data. This visual piece examines and demonstrates the relationship between immigration and crime in American cities over the past 40 years. Readers can see for themselves that increased immigration does not accompany higher violent crime rates. In fact, immigration is more frequently associated with reduced crime. This is important work: as of 2017, Gallup polls show that almost half of Americans agree that immigrants make crime worse. This research is crucial to debunking the dangerous myth that immigrants lead to crime.
  • Election 2014: Big Money, Secret Money

    In “Election 2014: Big Money, Secret Money,” the Center for Public Integrity tracked the impact and role of political advertising ahead of the Nov. 4 elections to help voters interpret special-interest influence on state-level and U.S. Senate elections in real time. Our unique project analyzed TV advertising for state-level races, statewide ballot measures and the battle over the U.S. Senate before voters went to the polls, then analyzed the results of those races as the election returns came in on Nov. 4. The stories we produced shined a light on what were essentially shadow campaigns occurring in races up and down the ballot, where outside groups and special interests spent millions of dollars independently of candidates and political parties to influence the outcomes.
  • Dispatch Poll

    America's top political bellwether and presidential campaign battleground. Thus, the nation's most closely watched state polls. Using social science methods pioneered by Philip Meyer - who developed them after failing miserably in two consecutive Ohio political polls some five decades ago - the Dispatch Poll proved the best barometer of any statewide survey in the country for the 2012 election.
  • Who Can Vote? Comprehensive Database of U.S. Voter Fraud Uncovers No Evidence That Photo ID Is Needed

    “Who Can Vote?” is the 2012 project of News21, a multimedia investigative reporting initiative funded by the Carnegie Corporation of New York and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and headquartered at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University. Twenty-four students from 11 universities across the country worked on the project under the direction of journalism professionals. The project, launched just before the 2012 political conventions, consists of more than 20 in-depth reports and rich multimedia content that includes interactive databases and data visualizations, video profiles and photo galleries. Student reporters conducted an exhaustive public records search and built a comprehensive data base of voter fraud cases that revealed: • Since 2000, while fraud has occurred, the number of cases is infinitesimal. • In-person voter impersonation on Election Day, which prompted 37 state legislatures to enact or consider tough voter ID laws, is virtually non-existent. Only 10 such cases over more than a decade were reported. • There is more fraud in absentee ballots and voter registration than any other category. The analysis shows 329 cases of absentee ballot fraud and 364 cases of registration fraud. A required photo ID at the polls would not have prevented these cases. • Voters make a lot of mistakes, from people accidentally voting twice to voting in the wrong precinct. However, few cases reveal a coordinated effort to change election results. • Election officials make a lot of mistakes, giving voters ballots when they’ve already voted, for instance. Election workers are often confused about voters’ eligibility requirements.
  • The Numbers Guy

    "Polls Foresaw Future, Which Looks Tough for Polling" came out two days after the 2008 Presidential Election, and examined the pollsters surveying the race state-by-state. Analysis did a good job of projecting Obama's victory. "Price Drop: Stocks, Homes, Now Triple-Word Scores" examined how point values in games can be skewed when rules change.
  • Buddy Johnson series

    Elections Supervisor Buddy Johnson was scrutinized for flawed elections occurring in Hillsborough County since he was elected in 2004. Precincts moved without notifying the voters and votes were lost do to poorly trained workers.
  • Broken Ballots

    After a primary election in "an inner city legislative precinct in Memphis" finished with a margin of just 13 votes for the winner, the Commercial Appeal looked into the election. Among its findings were: "names of dead people and others on vacant lots were used to cast ballots." Also, a poll worker who was tasked to monitor voting and "whose signature appears on Election Day records including vote tallies from voting machines was actually in New York on a taxpayer-funded trip that day, not at the polling place." In addition, hundreds of deceased persons and people who have moved away are still on the voter lists, and many Election Day workers at the polls have criminal records.
  • Investigation of Election Problems

    This series is an extensive look at problems that exist in the election system in Wisconsin. According to this investigation, the state runs a high risk of massive recounts in future presidential elections because of the inaccuracy of the election data and voter registration. What they found were thousands of voters with invalid address, ineligible voters who were allowed to cast their ballots on election day, and polling place log books listing hundreds of people as having voted twice. This series by the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel prompted a mayoral task force to investigate election problems in Milwaukee, state-wide audit of the election system, as well as a state-federal investigation into voter fraud.
  • Election Analyses

    By using PRIZM-NE, Claritas Corporation's lifestyle segmentation system, together with zipcodes collected during USA Today-CNN Gallup polling, the authors were able to analyze geographical and socioeconomic data. They were then able to profile such specific groups as Catholics or seniors with greater detail, not just the usual groupings used such as male vs female and white vs black. They found for example that veteran status was more indicative of politics than age. They also showed that the gap between the political attitudes of married vs unmarried women reached a record 38 percent, which was much larger than the 11 percent gap between men and women. Such data have traditionally only been available after exit polls, but the USA-Today team were able to track changes during the lead-up to the 2004 election.