Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "poverty" ...

  • Childhood Poverty: Cincinnati's Crisis - Study says Cincinnati needs more affordable housing units to help break cycle of poverty

    For the last four years, we've been researching why Cincinnati has one of the top 5 worst rates of child poverty in the country. Our stories focus on who could be responsible, and more importantly, potential solutions to the problem. We have produced more than 100 stories on this topic since 2015.
  • The Center for Public Integrity: Abandoned in America

    President Donald Trump has declared the United States’ economy to be “the best economy we've ever had in the history of our country.” His administration likewise declared the nation’s decades-long war on poverty “largely over and a success.” So during the summer of 2018, Center for Public Integrity reporters visited six communities where residents say the crushing effects of poverty and government neglect aren’t improving — they’ve gone from bad to worse. Problems range from broken education systems to unlivable housing to infrastructure fit for the third world. One factor bound them together: a profound lack of political clout on the eve of the 2018 midterm election that would determine the balance of power in Washington. Our work led to the publishing of “Abandoned in America” — a six-part, 27,000-word series published over two weeks during October 2018.
  • Who’s getting rich off your student debt?

    America’s student loan system was created in the 1960s as part of an effort to alleviate poverty and inequality. But by 2016, some 42 million Americans owed an astonishing $1.3 trillion on their student loans, and the debt load had doubled in eight years. How did a program intended to help deserving students go to college become a profit center for Wall Street, private investors, even the government? We sought to document how the nation’s student loan crisis unfolded – and who has profited from it.
  • Title I and School Funding Inequality

    The largest and most expensive federal education program, Title I, is meant to ensure that poor children living in high-poverty school districts have access to the same education opportunities as their wealthier peers. But our investigation found that 20 percent of Title I money – $2.6 billion – ends up in school districts with higher than average proportions of wealthy families. Because of quirks in the formula that doles out the money, Title I can often increase the local funding inequality that it was created to stop. Despite various policy proposals that would direct more money to concentrations of poverty, Congress has lacked the will to act. http://www.usnews.com/news/slideshows/which-schools-receive-the-most-title-i-funding http://www.usnews.com/photos/2016/06/01/photos-fairfax-virginia-school-district http://www.usnews.com/photos/2016/06/01/photos-nottoway-virginia-school-district
  • Black Out in the Black Belt

    The eyes of the world again turned to some Alabama's most neglected residents when Gov. Bentley announced in September the closures of driver's license offices. Our staff jumped into immediate action in uncovering the pattern of race and poverty in these actions, sounding an alarm picked up around the civilized world. "It's not just a civil rights violation," wrote investigative columnist John Archibald. "It is not just a public relations nightmare. It is not just an invitation for worldwide scorn and an alarm bell to the Justice Department. It is an affront to the very notion of justice in a nation where one man one vote is as precious as oxygen."
  • The Poor Kids of Silicon Valley

    Silicon Valley is built on the promise of the American Dream. Rags to riches. Anyone can make it. Apple and Google grew out of garages there. Yet CNN Opinion columnist John Sutter and videographer Brandon Ancil found this valley of riches, the heart of the U.S. tech industry, to be plagued by widespread and severe child poverty. Sutter argued that this is not only a moral outrage in this era of income inequality, it also undermines this valley’s future and that of the country. http://www.cnn.com/interactive/2015/03/opinion/ctl-child-poverty/#0
  • The State of Our Children

    Texas has a lot to brag about: It’s a leader in job growth, energy production and building. It’s also near the top of another list, but it’s not something you’ll likely see shared often on social media: child poverty. 1.7 million children in Texas living in poverty. TEGNA Media stations across Texas teamed up to expose this problem, and ask questions as to why this is the State of our Children.
  • Dirty Little Secrets: New Jersey’s Poorest Live Surrounded by Contamination

    WNYC found 89 percent of New Jerseyans live within a mile of a contaminated site. Most of those sites are in the process of being cleaned up, which can take years. But our investigation found 1,464 of the state’s 14,066 known contaminated sites don’t have any clean-up plan in place. Many sites have sat orphaned and polluted for years, and they are disproportionately found in low-income communities. http://www.wnyc.org/story/nj-contaminated-sites/
  • Instability Trap

    Years after supposedly emerging from the recession unscathed, Canadians are tapped out and falling off the radar: Participation rates have hit historic lows, especially for working-age men; many people who've found themselves out of work have given up on looking. Others find themselves in increasingly precarious work – bouncing from contract to contract, juggling multiple gigs without benefits. Our research revealed for the first time the way asset poverty is making households vulnerable to sudden economic shocks, and the way payday lenders and cheque-cashing outlets continue to proliferate in the poorest urban areas of the country. The response to our series was resounding: We were inundated with personal stories from people across the country who'd struggled with precarious work, penurious social assistance restrictions and predatory lending. For months we followed up our revelatory reporting with new information and reality checks on political claims and promises. We continue to do that. http://globalnews.ca/tag/instability-trap/
  • Evicted and Abandoned: The World Bank’s Broken Promise to the Poor

    Evicted and Abandoned is a global investigation that reveals how the World Bank Group, the powerful development lender committed to ending poverty, has regularly failed to follow its own rules for protecting vulnerable populations. The Center for Public Integrity’s International Consortium of Investigative Journalists teamed with the Huffington Post, the GroundTruth Project, the Investigative Fund, the Guardian and more than 20 other news organizations to develop this series of stories. In all, more than 80 journalists from 21 countries worked together to document the bank’s lapses and show their consequences for people around the globe. The reporting team traveled to affected communities in more than a dozen countries – including indigenous hamlets in the Peruvian Andes, fishing settlements along India’s northwest coast and a war-scarred village in Kosovo’s coal-mining belt. http://projects.huffingtonpost.com/projects/worldbank-evicted-abandoned