Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "pregnant" ...

  • 48 Hours: “Fatal Crossing”

    “Fatal Crossing” is a 48 Hours original investigation into the mysterious circumstances surrounding the deaths of Kadie Major, 26, and her 10-month-old daughter, River Lynn. In January 2008, their bodies were found along railroad tracks in Moncks Corner, SC. After a one-week investigation, the Berkeley County Sheriff’s Office determined that Kadie –five months pregnant— had murdered her daughter before killing herself by jumping in front of a moving train.
  • The Marshall Project and USA TODAY NETWORK - Tennessee: Too Sick for Jail — But Not for Solitary

    “Too Sick for Jail — But Not for Solitary” revealed for the first time the devastating toll of Tennessee’s “safekeeper” law that puts people in solitary confinement who are mentally ill, pregnant or juveniles despite not being convicted of any crime — and sparked prompt changes to the state’s 150-year-old law.
  • Unreasonable Doubt: Did Kelly Siegler Really Railroad an Innocent Man Eight Years Ago?

    The story investigates the troubling findings of a judge who recommended that a man convicted in 2007 of killing his pregnant wife receive a new trial.
  • NBC5 INVESTIGATES: OFF THEIR GUARD

    After a pregnant college student was sexually assaulted on Chicago’s south side, NBC5 Investigates began looking into the background of the suspect, and discovered he was supposed to be on juvenile electronic monitoring for a past arrest. Over the next several days, Phil Rogers continued to uncover serious flaws in Cook County’s system for monitoring juvenile offenders. By the end of the week – and a direct result of Rogers’ week-long reporting – the county completely reformed its system to – finally -- provide true 24-hour monitoring for juvenile offenders.
  • Pregnant Detainees in Immigration Detention

    Women caught up in America’s immigration detention complex are some of the most vulnerable in the world. As policy, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) says that pregnant women should be put on house arrest while fighting their deportation cases, rather than detained in prison-like facilities. After they told us repeatedly that they “don’t detain pregnant women” we found quite the contrary. Through serialized reporting, Fusion uncovered that nearly 600 pregnant detainees were held in detention centers in the last two years. Women that we spoke with said they were severely underfed and denied basic prenatal treatment. As the reporter and producer on the project, I, Cristina Costantini, uncovered that the agency even initially lied about a miscarriage that occurred in one detention center.
  • The State Where Giving Birth Can Be Criminal

    The piece looked at the effects of a new law in Tennessee that made it a criminal assault to give birth to a baby with drugs in its system. After a six-month investigation involving interviews with pregnant women, doctors, and health workers, we were able to document a consistent pattern of women being driven underground to avoid the fate they’ve seen in mug shots on the local news. Among many narratives: We learned of and/or spoke to women avoiding prenatal care and drug treatment in order to protect themselves from the punitive effects of the law; We learned of and/or spoke to women switching hospitals, avoiding hospital births, and even leaving the state to circumvent the law; We heard about pregnant women seeking drug treatment and being turned away for liability reasons.
  • A Fight For Faith

    Fight Night VI was billed as a boxing event for charity, with the main bout featuring two former college football players. But the event, hosted by Guts Church in Tulsa, Okla., was unsanctioned with no licensed referee or judges and no ringside doctor. When the bout was over, former University of Tulsa linebacker George Clinkscale, who had sickle cell trait, lost his life, leaving behind his pregnant fiancee and a young daughter. Using previously unseen video of the fight and unreleased medical records, Outside the Lines investigated the alarming lapses that led up to Clinkscale's death at the unconventional mega-church, where its pastor preaches the gospel of toughness and sports. The story explores what could have been done to prevent the tragedy, and raises disturbing questions about the methods used by some churches today to recruit new money and members
  • Broken Shield

    Decades ago, California created a special police force to patrol exclusively at its five state developmental centers – taxpayer-funded institutions where patients with severe autism and cerebral palsy have been beaten, tortured and raped by staff members. But California Watch found that this state force, the Office of Protective Services, does an abysmal job bringing perpetrators to justice. Reporter Ryan Gabrielson, a Pulitzer Prize winner, exposed the depths of the abuse inside these developmental centers while showing how sworn officers and detectives wait too long to start investigations, fail to collect evidence and ignore key witnesses – leading to an alarming inability to solve crimes inflicted upon some of society’s most vulnerable citizens. Dozens of women were sexually assaulted inside state centers, but police investigators didn’t order “rape kits” to collect evidence, a standard law enforcement tool. Police waited so long to investigate one sexual assault that the staff janitor accused of rape fled the country, leaving behind a pregnant patient incapable of caring for a child. The police force’s inaction also allowed abusive caregivers to continue molesting patients – even after the department had evidence that could have stopped future assaults. Many of the victims chronicled by California Watch are so disabled they cannot utter a word. Gabrielson gave them a resounding voice. Our Broken Shield series prompted far-reaching change, including a criminal investigation, staff retraining and new laws – all intended to bring greater safeguards and accountability.
  • The State of our Maternal Health

    In California, the health of pregnant women has been getting worse over the years and the maternal death rate is even worse that Bosnia's. The story investigated the causes behind what is making women sicker. One finding included showing that women in California are at a greater risk of having a cesarean surgery at for-profit hospitals where there is a financial incentive to perform this procedure.
  • Una Realidad Embarazosa: A Shameful Reality

    The story addresses the realities of teenage pregnancies in Colombia. The reporters examine the failures of sex education in schools and the lack of effective campaigns by the government. The story includes the profile of one young woman who, like many, chooses to get pregnant in order to escape domestic violence and poverty.