Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "prescriptions" ...

  • WaPo: The Opioid Files

    The Opioid Files for the first time identified not only the counties flooded with the highest amount of prescription opioid pills at the height of the prescription drug crisis, but the pharmacies that were specifically responsible for bringing those pills in. The Post found that over a seven-year period from 2006-2012, over 76 billion pills of hydrocodone and oxycodone were shipped to pharmacies across the country, in some places more than enough for one pill per person per day in some communities. The Post also found that opioid death rates tracked quite well with the rates of pills being shipped into those counties. And The Post identified counties and pharmacies with suspicious patterns and amounts of pills. In making the data available in county- and pharmacy-level chunks, The Post allowed reporters from other organizations across the country to write stories about their own communities and the impact that pills had on them.
  • CNN Exclusive: The more opioids doctors prescribe, the more money they make

    As tens of thousands of Americans die from prescription opioid overdoses each year, an exclusive analysis by CNN and researchers at Harvard University found that opioid manufacturers are paying physicians huge sums of money -- and the more opioids a doctor prescribes, the more money he or she makes. In 2014 and 2015, opioid manufacturers paid hundreds of doctors across the country six-figure sums for speaking, consulting and other services. Thousands of other doctors were paid over $25,000 during that time. Physicians who prescribed particularly large amounts of the drugs were the most likely to get paid.
  • Palm Beach Post: The Fentanyl Scandal

    An investigation of the maker of a deadly drug shows its outrageous and deadly sales push had local roots, identifies local doctors who took advantage of liberal payments to prescribe the drug and finds never-before reported death numbers associated with the drug.
  • Military.com: Air Force HIV Prevention Drugs

    If you're a gay man in uniform, the Air Force presents a dilemma. You can fly for the service, or you can take Truvada, a pre-exposure prophylactic drug designed to reduce the risk of HIV. The Air Force bars pilots from using the drug, citing safety concerns. But critics say the service's reticence to approve the medication is a symptom of latent cultural reticence bordering on homophobia, and moralistic concerns over a sexually promiscuous lifestyle. This report includes interviews with pilots who have been affects by the policy, including one who opted to avoid the service due to the restriction. A follow-up report details how the Air Force reversed course to approve the drug, showing the impact of Military.com's reporting.
  • CBS News: Healthcare Fraud in America

    For the past four years, CBS News has been committed to investigating healthcare fraud throughout the United States. Our reporting has uncovered schemes preying on veterans, cancer patients, rural communities, and opioid addicts. We’ve been the only network to expose con artists defrauding billions from private insurance companies, Medicare and even Tricare, a component of the military health system. In 2016 we produced an investigative series that found compounding pharmacies were collecting prescriptions for pain creams and billing insurance more than $1 million per week. Last year, our reporting revealed an insurance scheme involving genetic testing that cost the Pentagon trillions. This year’s entries continue our work to expose unscrupulous actors bilking insurance to cash in on the American healthcare system. Our stories go beyond examining the fiscal toll of insurance fraud, they illustrate the human impact these practices have on communities, families, and individuals.
  • 60 Minutes: The Rockford File

    A look at the fight that Rockford, Ill., took up against the high cost of prescription drugs explains why they cost more in the U.S. than nearly every other place in the world. Lesley Stahl's report pulls back the curtain on a drug distribution chain in which just about every link has the potential to make money when prices go up.
  • Troubling Pharmacies

    An investigation of nearly seven years of Virginia pharmacy board case decisions leads to the state making it easier for consumers to find out which health professionals are on probation but still working. It uncovers the area's largest health-provider, which had to outsource its hospital IV fluid mixing when it failed a pharmacy inspection, and got hospital officials to describe the details of the corrective action taken. It tells the story of a single pharmacist who never lost a day of work despite multiple probations from nearly 50 violations cited in board orders. It identifies the 17 area pharmacies that were cited for violations. And it reveals board reporting delays and transparency issues that keep consumers from making informed decisions on where to safely have their prescriptions filled.
  • Derby Pain Clinic's High Prescribing Of Cancer Drug Extends Beyond Nurse

    Culling and analyzing newly released data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, C-HIT Senior Writer Lisa Chedekel found an interesting prescribing pattern: four nurse practitioners, all affiliated with a tiny Derby pain clinic, prescribed nearly all of the state's Medicare spending for the opioid painkiller Subsys. The nurses were responsible for 279 prescriptions for Subsys, at a cost of $2.3 million in 2014. Nationally, only 10 nurse practitioners prescribed Subsys - with the majority of prescriptions written by doctors.
  • Drug Problems: Dangerous Decision-Making at the FDA

    The public depends on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to ensure that medicines are safe and effective, but through many months and almost 30,000 words of reporting, POGO’s ongoing “Drug Problems” investigation has revealed dangerously lax FDA oversight of prescription drugs. We found that the FDA has set low standards, approved drugs based on flawed clinical trials, taken a toothless approach toward doctors who violate standards of clinical research, allowed misleading marketing, provided inadequate warnings about drug hazards, slighted reports of drug-related deaths and injuries, withheld important information from the public, and made other dubious judgments that advanced the interests of pharmaceutical companies while putting patients at potentially deadly risk. Among other developments detailed in our package: After we exposed a potentially crippling flaw in the testing of a blockbuster drug, the FDA and its European counterpart said they were reexamining the clinical trial upon which they had based the drug’s approval.
  • Troubled kids, powerful drugs

    Psychiatric drugs flow at the Pennsylvania state-operated secure youth correctional facilities, where chronic and violent juvenile offenders are sent. Some health and justice professional think they might be being drugged into behaving. The state lacks a system to track the prescribing in any significant way beyond how much it's costing, and they went to great lengths to conceal the identities of the doctors prescribing the medications.