Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "presidents" ...

  • The Afghanistan Paper

    A confidential trove of government documents obtained by the Washington Post revealed that senior U.S. government officials systematically failed to tell the truth about the war in Afghanistan for the duration of the 18-year conflict. The documents, obtained in response to two FOIA lawsuits, showed in raw, unfiltered detail that senior officials privately concluded the war had become unwinnable even as three U.S. presidents and other government leaders kept insisting publicly - year after year - they were making progress and would prevail.
  • The Biggest Bribe in Swedish History? TeliaSonera and Azerbaijan’s dictator

    As a result of Swedish Television's previous revelations, with suspected bribes in Uzbekistan, telecom TeliaSonera's new management said it would clean up the company's dirty past. But SVT, TT and the OCCRP this year revealed yet another suspect bribery affair - with a dictatorship – which the management had not reported to the police. It is by far the biggest alleged bribe in Sweden’s history, where the Swedish telecom giant is suspected of having enriched the Azerbaijani presidential family with up to 1 billion US dollars (depending on exchange rate) – for an asset taken from the Azeri people. [[https://www.occrp.org/corruptistan/azerbaijan/azerbaijan-telecom/offshores-close-to-president-paid-nothing-for-share-of-state-telecom.php#]] [[http://www.svt.se/ug/documents-reveal-telia-sonera-involved-in-suspected-large-scale-bribery]] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nh3CayWd29M]] [[https://www.occrp.org/corruptistan/azerbaijan/azerbaijan-telecom/khadija-calls-latest-teliasonera-bribe-story-dangerous.php]] [[https://www.occrp.org/en/investigations/2531-teliasoneras-behind-the-scenes-connection-to-azerbaijani-presidents-daughters]] [[https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxZjxumuFAv8Q1dWd2NSSnlFNGM/view]]
  • University Presidents Tackle Football's Future

    Medical science, lawsuits and money are changing the landscape for college football. What do university presidents have to say about the future of a sport that causes brain damage? We contacted every Division I university president assuring them their responses would be published in their entirety. Watch University Presidents Tackle Football's Future for an overview and a surprising finding about university presidents being questioned about concussions, the risk of the concussion litigation and the cost of college athletics. http://www.presidentalfootball.com http://www.presidentialfootball.com/
  • Nuclear Waste

    What could possibly be wrongheaded about a U.S.-Russian effort to eliminate 64 tons of plutonium that could be fashioned into thousands of nuclear weapons? Begun in the 1990’s, it was blessed by four presidents, including Barack Obama, who called it an important way “to prevent terrorists from acquiring nuclear weapons.” To carry it out, the federal government spent billions of dollars on a South Carolina plant to transform the Cold War detritus into fuel for civilian nuclear power plants, an act meant to turn swords into ploughshares — all with surprisingly little debate or oversight in Washington. When the Center for Public Integrity looked closely at the project, after hearing of some of its troubles, we found plenty of scandal. Our major conclusions are reported in our "Nuclear Waste" series of four articles totaling around 12,000 words that were published in June 2013.
  • Checks Without Balances: Big Pay in Tough Times

    This is a three-part series and continuing coverage based off of hundreds of thousands of pay records for state and local employees that found outsized pay and perks in lesser known agencies, pension spiking by community college presidents and five-figure bonus deals for some officials that had been done without the knowledge of elected boards.
  • United in Largesse

    United in Largesse is about extravagant spending and lack of accountability in the International Brotherhood of Boilermakers union, which has its headquarters in Kansas City, Kan. The Kansas City Star found that the union president’s salary and expenses far topped those of the presidents of the country’s largest unions and that the union had hired numerous officers’ relatives at robust salaries. The story also showed that union officials traveled by charter or first class to attractive destinations, squandered money on exclusive pheasant-hunting expeditions and Alaskan fly-fishing adventures and gave expensive cars as gifts to retiring officers. The Star also raised serious questions about conflicts of interest involving union pension fund trustees.
  • Fair Housing in America

    ProPublica reporter Nikole Hannah-Jones looked at how and why the Dept. of Housing & Urban Development has failed to enforce the Fair Housing Act. She traced the nation’s history of housing discrimination, from the Great Migration of African Americans to Northern cities in the early 1900’s to the post-World War II boom and into the 1960’s. Again and again, her reporting showed, federal agencies played a pivotal role in keeping white and black Americans separate. While the law required localities to “affirmatively further’’ fair housing, neither Democratic nor Republican presidents had the political will to enforce it. Over time, courts interpreted that provision to mean that HUD could withhold billions of dollars in grants from communities that were not doing everything possible to end segregation. Yet officials charged with enforcing the fair housing law told Hannah-Jones they were often ignored or undercut by others inside HUD, who saw the agency’s main mission as distributing development dollars. Even when courts issued rulings insisting that communities honor the law’s intentions, as she notes in a case about Westchester County, New York, they were routinely ignored by HUD officials and local politicians alike. Hannah-Jones also looked at how little HUD does to root out or punish racial steering and overt discrimination in the sale and rental of property. Millions of Latinos and African Americans face such bias each year. Yet HUD hardly ever does the sort of undercover testing proven to catch landlords and real estate agents in the act.
  • The Secret University

    Lu Hardin, popular president of the University of Central Arkansas , received a $3000,000 bonus, approved in secret by the college's board of trustees - a violation of Arkansas' Freedom of Information Act. Trustees told the reporter that the bonus came from private funds, but she discovered that the board had used public funds in violations of rules capping the amount of public funds that can be used for college presidents' salaries.
  • The Redevelopment Investigation

    This investigation came in several installments throughout the year. The city of San Diego, unlike any other government in California, operates two redevelopment agencies outside of the traditional City Hall structure and with little oversight, running them as separate nonprofit corporations with their own presidents, boards, offices and identities. An investigation into those two public agencies, which have combined annual budgets of nearly $300 million, uncovered a rogue system of forgotten government, which was underscored by a clandestine bonus system. The president of one agency used to pay herself and her aides more than $1 million over 5 years and numerous conflicts of interests between developers and top officials.
  • Signing Statements

    Among the presidential powers the Bush-Cheney Administration has worked to expand are "to act in defiance of laws passed by Congress, to shield itself from outside oversight and to impose greater political control over the permanent government." The Globe exposed the role of "a previously obscure device called a "presidential signing statement." President Bush "has employed this mechanism to claim the right to ignore more than 800 laws, asserting that he can set aside any bill provision conflicting with his interpretation of the powers given to him by the Constitution." This power has been used in place of the more limited presidential veto, and "he has used it more often than all previous presidents combined." This has been a push from Vice President Cheney's office, as his history of asserting nearly unlimited presidential power is also examined.