Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "prevention" ...

  • Military.com: Air Force HIV Prevention Drugs

    If you're a gay man in uniform, the Air Force presents a dilemma. You can fly for the service, or you can take Truvada, a pre-exposure prophylactic drug designed to reduce the risk of HIV. The Air Force bars pilots from using the drug, citing safety concerns. But critics say the service's reticence to approve the medication is a symptom of latent cultural reticence bordering on homophobia, and moralistic concerns over a sexually promiscuous lifestyle. This report includes interviews with pilots who have been affects by the policy, including one who opted to avoid the service due to the restriction. A follow-up report details how the Air Force reversed course to approve the drug, showing the impact of Military.com's reporting.
  • ADG: Violent Reality

    Since 1999, more than 8,000 Arkansans have died by gunfire — about half of them suicides. Although many law enforcement officials and legislators say that gun-control laws might work, they are unwilling to act. The stories explore the effect of specific laws on gun violence in other states, suicide-prevention advocates' work with gun sellers to keep weapons out of suicidal individuals' possession, and federal law enforcement's efforts to keep guns out of the hands of felons.
  • PUSHING PAIN: PROFITS BEFORE PATIENTS

    The amount of painkillers dispensed in the U.S. nearly quadrupled from 1999-2010 even though the amount of pain Americans have reported has not changed, resulting in what the Centers for Disease Control and prevention calls an epidemic which takes over twenty thousand lives each year. This was an impetus for Reporter Dina Gusovsky to investigate a publicly traded specialty pharmaceutical company called Insys Therapeutics, which is accused of contributing to these grim statistics. It’s main revenue generating drug is a highly addictive opiate one hundred times more powerful that morphine, which the FDA says should only be used for late stage cancer pain; however, the company is now being investigated in at least six states for pushing the drug far beyond cancer patients, engaging in kickback schemes, off-label marketing, and other illegal business practices all in attempt to grow profits. Two days after our report first aired, which included exclusive interviews with whistleblowers and investigators, the company’s CEO resigned. http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000444339&play=1 http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000445892&play=1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m9Uy3eDqzUc https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JP28vnux3yI https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MXFetMnNJSk
  • Tijuana Tire Valley

    In an investigation that took us across the border, we explored the failure of the California state government to properly allocate funds collected from a consumer fee to prevent severe pollution of a bi-national region. We discovered California recycling fees were being used to ship tires to the border where they are sold and resold in Mexico; until the tires eventually wash back into environmentally sensitive lands in the United States. NBC7 Investigates uncovered a ballooning $60 million state "tire recycling management fund" that has since been targeted for better use by the Speaker of the Assembly. We followed tires from the California tire store to the border to deeper into Mexico to Tijuana, where tires are in such surplus they have become a fixture of architecture.
  • Ebola Crisis: Unprepared in Dallas

    For months in the summer of 2014, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had warned the country’s health-care community that an outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus in Western Africa could make its way here. The feds assured the public that America’s modern medical resources and infrastructure could avert a crisis. We were told hospitals had prepared and trained their staffs, using CDC guidelines, to address a virus they had never seen. Yet in late September, when a Liberian man named Thomas Eric Duncan walked into a Dallas emergency room with fever, headache and abdominal pains, his doctor and nurses found him unremarkable – just another of the night’s many victims of mishap and contagion. He was sent away after a few hours with antibiotics. None of the caregivers realized the encounter would soon become part of U.S. medical history.
  • KBS Panorama Disaster Prevention Documentary <Remember the Sewol >

    Was the Sewol tragedy really unavoidable? This program takes us back to the day when the Sewol took some 400 passengers from Incheon Port to Jeju Island. Based on the statements of all those involved, it turned out that the ferry – an old ferry imported from Japan and illegally renovated – disregarded the safety regulations to carry more freight. Greed was the underlying cause of this calamity.
  • Sex offenses on campus

    This story uncovered the causes for an incredibly low rate of reporting and prosecution for sex offenses at the University of Missouri. As many people know, universities have especially high rates of sexual victimization, such as rape, and especially low rates of prosecution for those crimes. My investigation, which took more than a year because of resistance from campus officials, revealed that only two sex offenses were ever reported to the student disciplinary office in 2012. Sexual violence survey data suggests the actual number of violations was more likely in the thousands, and nearly 100 violations were reported to campus police or the Relationship and Sexual Violence Prevention Center. Throughout my reporting I discovered legal barriers, indifference among law enforcement, lack of communication and social phenomena that all contribute to this incredibly low rate. The article showed that prosecution for sex offenses at the University of Missouri is extremely rare, perhaps even more rare than prosecution in the state court system.
  • Sex offenses on campus

    This story uncovered the causes for an incredibly low rate of reporting and prosecution for sex offenses at the University of Missouri. As many people know, universities have especially high rates of sexual victimization, such as rape, and especially low rates of prosecution for those crimes. My investigation, which took more than a year because of resistance from campus officials, revealed that only two sex offenses were ever reported to the student disciplinary office in 2012. Sexual violence survey data suggests the actual number of violations was more likely in the thousands, and nearly 100 violations were reported to campus police or the Relationship and Sexual Violence Prevention Center. Throughout my reporting I discovered legal barriers, indifference among law enforcement, lack of communication and social phenomena that all contribute to this incredibly low rate. The article showed that prosecution for sex offenses at the University of Missouri is extremely rare, perhaps even more rare than prosecution in the state court system.
  • The Dallas Morning News: Texas' Cancer-Fighting Agency

    Since May, 2012, The Dallas Morning News has published a dozen stories and 16 blog posts on a series of political and legal problems facing a new state agency, The Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas. The agency opened to much acclaim in 2009; it is the second-largest U.S. source of funds to fight cancer, second only to the federal government’s National Cancer Institute.
  • No Small Thing

    The Poughkeepsie Journal series “No Small Thing” goes where no other newspaper or media outlet has – it challenges the mainstream medical dogma on Lyme disease. In rigorously documented articles, Projects Writer Mary Beth Pfeiffer concludes that the major actors in this public health scandal -- chiefly the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Infectious Disease Society of America – have minimized and mismanaged a burgeoning epidemic of tick-borne disease at great harm to thousands of infected people. These two powerful institutions have held – in policy and pronouncement -- that Lyme disease is easy to diagnose and easy to cure. It is neither.