Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "prisoner" ...

  • FLIPPED: Secrets Inside a Corrupt Police Department

    A year-long investigation by a one-man-band investigative reporter revealed institutional and systemic failures inside a large Metro Atlanta police department. By cultivating internal police sources, he was able to demand specific, hidden public records that uncovered the following scandals the Roswell Police Department tried to keep secret from the public: Officers arrested a driver for speeding using a ‘coin flip’ app; Police covered up a K9 brutally mauling a teen suspect who had already surrendered; Top sergeant intentionally froze a 13-year-old boy to get him to tell the truth; Department concealed the release of a suspected drunk driver - one of its own officers; and Officer failed to help a dying prisoner because that officer was already under investigation. This investigation and public records fight resulted in the resignation of the police chief, the firing of three police officers, and an overhaul of the city's open records system to improve public access.
  • Lasting Scars

    Prisoners waterboarded and tortured by the U.S. suffered enduring wounds — flashbacks, nightmares, depression, headaches — without ever being properly treated.
  • Dying in Private Prisons

    This harrowing investigative series into America’s shadow system of privatized federal prisons for The Nation magazine and The Investigative Fund exposed deadly medical neglect and failed government oversight, and led to a major announcement by the Department of Justice in August ordering the Bureau of Prisons to end its use of private prison operators.
  • The Man Inside: Four months as a prison guard

    Prisons are almost impossible for reporters to get inside, and few people know what life inside is like for inmates and guards. But one journalist cracked the shell of secrecy by getting a job as a prison guard. He witnessed cost-cutting measures and reported safety concerns affecting prisoners and staff. On this episode of Reveal, they take an unprecedented look inside the multibillion-dollar private prison industry. https://www.revealnews.org/episodes/the-man-inside-four-months-as-a-prison-guard/ http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2016/06/cca-private-prisons-corrections-corporation-inmates-investigation-bauer
  • Solitary: Way Down in the Hole

    This four-part series exposed, for the first time, Minnesota’s heavy use of solitary confinement. By building a database and through prisoner interviews, we found more than 1,600 examples of inmates spending six months or longer in isolation over the past 10 years, and 437 instances of prisoners serving one year or longer. We documented more than 24,000 cases of inmates spending longer than 15 days in solitary—the time frame the United Nations defines as human torture. The series also showed how inmates come to prison with pre-existing mental illnesses and end up in isolation only to deteriorate mentally. The final installment told of the difficult path for inmates once they leave isolation. In more than 700 cases in the past six years alone, offenders left prison directly from solitary confinement.
  • Undisclosed police misconduct in Springfield, Mass.

    These stories document a series of misconduct allegations against Springfield, Mass. police officers which remained undisclosed by authorities until uncovered by reporters with MassLive/The Republican. Drawing on public records requests, interviews with alleged victims and tips from confidential sources, the series centers on three incidents: the death of a prisoner in Springfield Police headquarters, the suspension of a detective who threatened to kill a juvenile suspect and an investigation into allegations that off-duty officers beat a group of men after an argument at a bar. The series has led to changes in how the city reports police misconduct allegations, an effort by city councilors to reinstate a civilian police commission and an external review of the department’s internal investigations unit.
  • Doubled Up In Solitary Confinement

    This seems like a contradiction. Put a prison inmate into a solitary confinement cell and then give him a cellmate. It’s called “double-cell solitary confinement”: Two inmates considered so dangerous and violent that they’re removed from the general prison population but then put together in one tiny cell, together for 23 to 24 hours a day. NPR’s Investigations Unit exposed this little-known practice that is common in federal and state prisons. The series showed how double-cell solitary confinement results in high levels of prison violence and sharply increases the likelihood of inmates killing other inmates.
  • Solitary Lives: An investigation into the secret world of solitary confinement

    In prison cells across North Carolina, government officials are meting out punishment that human rights experts say amounts to torture. For more than 13 years, the state kept inmate Jason Swain in solitary confinement - a punishment that research shows often causes and exacerbates mental illness. Swain, who suffers from bipolar depression, repeatedly swallowed razors and ripped open his surgical incisions. The Observer found he was just one of seven N.C. inmates who had spent more than a decade in solitary. Even 16-year-olds are confined to solitary in North Carolina - before they’re convicted of crimes.
  • Undisclosed police misconduct in Springfield, Mass.

    These stories document a series of misconduct allegations against Springfield, Mass. police officers which remained undisclosed by authorities until uncovered by reporters with MassLive/The Republican. Drawing on public records requests, interviews with alleged victims and tips from confidential sources, the series centers on three incidents: the death of a prisoner in Springfield Police headquarters, the suspension of a detective who threatened to kill a juvenile suspect and an investigation into allegations that off-duty officers beat a group of men after an argument at a bar. The series has led to changes in how the city reports police misconduct allegations, an effort by city councilors to reinstate a civilian police commission and an external review of the department’s internal investigations unit.
  • The Turn Toward Tehran

    How secret cash payments helped pave the way for a release of prisoners and new opening to Iran.