Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "province" ...

  • VICE News with The Investigative Fund: A Slaughter in Silence

    In a series of reports for VICE News, in partnership with The Investigative Fund, Nick Turse investigated a startling campaign of violence that swept through Djugu territory in the Democratic Republic of Congo’s Ituri province in late 2017 and early 2018.
  • Racism in the Ranks

    The 2018 acquittal of Gerald Stanley in the death of Colten Boushie reverberated across the country. Indigenous people rallied against what they saw as an injustice. “We knew we really went back 10 years, maybe fifteen years on all the work we’ve been trying to do in this province in this country on reconciliation.” – Darlene Okemaysim-Sicotte, Advocate for Indigenous women Stanley shot and killed Boushie after the 22-year-old Cree man and friends had driven on Stanley’s farm in rural Saskatchewan. In the midst of the debate over whether the not guilty verdict was a symptom of systemic racism or support of the right to defend property, APTN Investigates video journalist Trina Roache discovered racist posts by an RCMP (ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE) officer on social media.
  • Postmedia: Follow the Money

    Follow the Money is a data journalism project conceived by reporter Zane Schwartz as part of a year-long Postmedia fellowship. “I was frustrated by the way donations to politicians are recorded,” says Schwartz. “We know money matters in politics, but figuring out who is consistently giving that money to candidates and parties requires a level of detective-work out of reach for the average voter.” To address this gap, Schwartz worked with a team of journalists at Postmedia to create an accessible search tool for contributions at both the federal level and in every province and territory — a first of its kind.
  • Smoked Out

    A CBC Edmonton investigation revealed the process for selecting a legal consortium to represent the province of Alberta in a multi-billion dollar lawsuit against the tobacco industry had been manipulated. The lawsuit, the largest in the government’s history, is worth potentially billions of dollars to the province’s coffers and hundreds of millions of dollars in contingency fees for the legal consortium. The manipulation allowed now-former premier Alison Redford the opportunity to choose a consortium to which she had close personal and political ties.
  • Corruption in Iraq

    Before the Iraqi district of Sinjar in Ninewa province fell into the hands of the Islamic State, foul drinking water was making people sick with preventable diseases. The U.S. tried to fix the problem by digging wells and treatment facilities, but poor oversight and shoddy work from contractors left the area no better than it had started, despite millions of dollars spent in reconstruction money. An investigation into Iraqi efforts to fix the problem after the U.S. withdrew showed that projects remained unfinished, but money for maintenance and fuel continued to pour into the pockets of local officials. In an area where extremists use frustration over corruption to recruit followers. the implications of this corruption couldn’t be more serious.
  • Fatal Encounters

    Fatal Encounters is a six-part series regarding issues surrounding officer-involved homicides in the United States that was published in the Reno News & Review. It was begun more than a year before the events in Ferguson, Missouri, and other similar incidents, but started publishing in February 2014. There were also integrated social media campaigns on Twitter and Facebook. Major findings are that government does not accurately collect statistics regarding officer-involved homicides, law enforcement agencies are often resistant to following public records laws regarding issues of officer-involved homicides, officers involved are almost invariably damaged psychologically, mental illness is a very large factor in who gets killed by police, and collecting substantial data is no longer solely the province of big media or the government.
  • Canada's Unwanted

    A Global News investigation into the way Canada treats its non-citizens - refugee applicants, immigration detainees and just about anyone the government is trying to get rid of or whose status in the country remains up in the air - found systems rife with arbitrary opacity and questionable practices. They revealed never-before-published deaths in detention and pressured the Border Services Agency into releasing more information on the people who die in its custody. They also outlined the way Canada detains people indefinitely in jails on no charge – often with limited access to family, legal counsel and third-party monitoring agencies, denying repeated requests by the Red Cross to perform inspections of immigrant detention facilities in Canada's most populous province. In two years, Canada paid thousands of applicants to abandon their appeals and leave the country.
  • Fatal Care

    After a four-year battle with government, the Edmonton Journal won unprecedented access to death records for all of the children who died in provincial care between 1999 and 2013. Reporter Karen Kleiss cross-referenced nearly 2,000 pages of death records with court documents and fatality inquiry reports to build a database that revealed 145 children had died in care, more than triple the number reported by government. Kleiss analyzed the database for trends and, with Calgary Herald reporter Darcy Henton, searched the province for grieving families who had never before told their stories. In the wake of the series, the government pledged to create unprecedented transparency around child welfare deaths, overhaul the child death review system and reconsider a publication ban that prohibits families and media from sharing the names and images of these children with the public.
  • Hooked: Canada's Pill Problem

    Which Canadians pop the most pills? What's the correlation between prescription, abuse and deaths connected to potent opioids? What happens when you crack down on one widely abuse opioid - but only one? We created an original database tracking opioid prescriptions across provinces and compared that with data on abuse and opioid-related deaths. We spoke with people who've lost loved ones to opioid use, to the companies manufacturing these drugs and the policy-makers trying to combat their abuse. Our data shed new light on the topic and gave health ministers something new on which to act.
  • Disastrous Relief

    The Manitoba Association of Native Firefighters (or MANFF) was supposed to be an advocate for Aboriginal evacuees of the devastating Manitoba floods of 2011. Two First Nations communities were completely written-off by flood waters, leaving over 2,000 people homeless. MANFF was to make life easier for these evacuees as they waited-out government wrangling in hotels and rental houses scattered throughout the province, separated form loved ones and their home communities. $85 million (and counting) flowed through MANFF to care for these evacuees. And yet millions of dollars in bills went unpaid. Frustrated and frightened evacuees eventually contacted APTN with reports of bullying and mistreatment by MANFF staff. Melissa Ridgen looks for answers in APTN Investigates’ Season 5 premier, Disastrous Relief.