Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "psychiatrist" ...

  • Juvenile Sexual Assaults Victims of Dr. William Ayres: The Forgotten Victims

    For forty years, hundreds of juveniles in San Mateo County, California were sexually assaulted in court-ordered sessions by prominent child psychiatrist Dr. William Ayres. But when the victims spoke out, they were either ignored or punished by authorities. It wasn’t until 2002, when journalist Victoria Balfour contacted police on behalf of one of Ayres’ victims, a private patient, that a criminal case against Ayres began to get traction. In 2013, Ayres, a former President of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, pleaded no contest to molesting boys who had been his private patients. He was sentenced to eight years in prison. However, Balfour had a fierce belief that the voices of his juvenile victims urgently needed to be heard in this case as well. When agencies in San Mateo County whose job it was to protect juveniles rebuffed her request to find the juvenile victims, Balfour embarked on a 3 and-a-half year project to find them herself. Working on a detective's theory that most of Ayres' juvenile victims were now in prison, she wrote to more than 300 inmates from San Mateo County and asked if they had been evaluated by Ayres. Balfour’s article recounts the horrifying and heartbreaking responses she received from inmates about their abuse by Dr. Ayres, one of the most prolific child molesters in recent California history.
  • Missed Treatment: Soldiers With Mental Health Issues Dismissed For ‘Misconduct’

    We revealed for the first time that the Army has kicked out tens of thousands of soldiers who came back from Iraq and Afghanistan with mental health problems and traumatic brain injuries, and taken away their benefits, on the grounds that those soldiers committed some sort of “misconduct”– despite the fact that Congress passed a law in 2009 to try to prevent it. Our stories were not only the first ones that revealed this crucial information: Army officials told us that until we asked and pushed for these statistics under FOIA, they never compiled them, period.Our report also showed that a top-level Army investigation, into allegations that soldiers were being mistreated, was essentially a whitewash. And we let the public hear, for the first time, actual psychotherapy sessions between a troubled soldier and Army psychiatrists. You can actually hear the therapists belittle the soldier and shrug off his mental health problems. http://www.npr.org/2015/10/28/451146230/missed-treatment-soldiers-with-mental-health-issues-dismissed-for-misconduct
  • Culture of Fear

    A University of Minnesota hospital insider comes forward with secret recordings which reveal a "culture of fear" and a "research at all costs" attitude in which the well being of extremely vulnerable psychiatric patients takes a back seat to having them participate in drug trials. The series includes a profile of one patient who's own medical records provide compelling evidence he was coerced into taking an experimental drug that nearly drove him to commit suicide. Another report probes the haunting case of a UM psychiatrist who diagnosed a teenager with a mental illness and determined he needed medication to reduce the threat of violent behaviors. But the doctor did not disclose his findings to the boy's family. Weeks later the boy, who was still un-medicated, went on a killing spree.
  • The Girl Who Got Tied Down

    The Girl Who Got Tied Down is a documentary In two parts about a girl, “Nora”, whit self-destructive behaviour, who got raped by one of Sweden’s most senior police chiefs while she was placed in residential youth care. The documentary reveals several cases of abuse due to the work of the health service and the police in Sweden. It has created uproar and a great deal of anger. In the wake of The Girl Who Got Tied Down the senior psychiatrist charged with caring for “Nora” has been sacked from the hospital where he worked. The private mental health care company which he owns has lost its contract with the County Council.
  • The Girl Who Got Tied Down

    The Girl Who Got Tied Down is a documentary In two parts about a girl, “Nora”, with self-destructive behaviour, who got raped by one of Sweden’s most senior police chiefs while she was placed in residential youth care. The documentary reveals several cases of abuse due to the work of the health service and the police in Sweden. It has created uproar and a great deal of anger. In the wake of The Girl Who Got Tied Down the senior psychiatrist charged with caring for “Nora” has been sacked from the hospital where he worked. The private mental health care company which he owns has lost its contract with the County Council.
  • The Nazi and the Psychiatrist

    The Nazi and the Psychiatrist is a book of narrative journalism about a young U.S. Army psychiatrist, Douglas M. Kelley, who went to Nuremberg in 1945 to assess the sanity of the top Nazi leaders being held for trial. Kelley developed a close relationship with the highest-ranking German, Hermann Göring. The psychiatrist's findings greatly influenced his career and led him into a downward spiral that concluded with his suicide in 1958. The book explores the connection between Kelley's work and his suicide, and evaluates the significance of his psychiatric studies of the Nazis.
  • A Threat Ignored: The Aurora Theater Shooting Investigation

    As police were cordoning off the crime scene, the KMGH-TV investigative team immediately focused on the shooter and how he was able to carry out his deadly mission. Within a few hours, Investigative Reporter John Ferrugia was on the air reporting specific and exclusive details of how 24-year old James Holmes had gained access to the theater and carried out his deadly mission. In subsequent weeks, KMGH-TV team uncovered information showing that the University of Colorado Threat Assessment team had known about Holmes' mental health issues and his potential for harming others. In multiple exclusive reports Ferrugia detailed how Holmes psychiatrist had contacted not only the University "BETA Team", but University police with concerns that Holmes could be a threat because he had told her about his fantasies of "killing a lot of people". These stories made national headlines with the stories attributed the KMGH-TV.
  • America's Great State Payroll Giveaway

    A state-employed psychiatrist in California made $822,000 by clocking in 17 hours every day last year, including Sundays and holidays. An employee cashed out with $609,000 for unused vacation when she retired, claiming she never took vacations in a 30-year career. A highway patrol officer collected $484,000 in salary, pension and leave payments. The chief money manager at a Texas pension fund got $1 million in salary and bonuses while posting investment returns that trailed those of peers who earned a quarter as much. Bloomberg News used freedom-of-information laws to obtain 1.4 million payroll records from the 12 largest states and show how taxpayers funded these out-of-control expenses and more, while at the same time states cut funding for universities, public safety, health care, schools and services aimed at the neediest residents.
  • Hospital at Risk

    My investigation of the Minnesota Security Hospital, a state-run facility that provides psychiatric treatment to nearly 400 adults deemed "mentally ill and dangerous," uncovered high rates of violence and injuries of employees and patients at the facility, a critical shortage of psychiatrists, and widespread confusion among employees about what to do when a patient becomes violent. I found that much of confusion was the result of the abrasive, threatening management style of head administrator David Proffitt, who was hired in 2011 to reform the facility. I began investigating Proffitt and found he was hired without a basic background check. I uncovered many troubling details from Proffitt's past, including domestic violence, a PhD from a now-defunct online degree mill, a forced resignation from his previous job as the administrator of a private psychiatric hospital in Maine, and other failings. The state ordered Proffitt to resign and the Minnesota legislative auditor began an audit of the department's hiring practices. The assistant commissioner of the Department of Human Services who led the hiring search also resigned. The governor proposed $40 million in renovations to address safety concerns. Regulators from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration visited the facility for the first time in 21 years. The facility also implemented new training for employees to reduce violence. My investigation of the facility continues.
  • Failure to Aid

    Over the last year, I spent a lot of time researching and reporting on stories pertaining to the mental health treatment of people in prison. More specifically, I have successfully fought to gain access to public records in order to tell the story of Tony Lester. Tony was a young man who had been diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia. He committed an assault and was sentenced to serve time at the Arizona State Prison in Tucson. Tragically, Tony committed suicide while in prison. Staff in the prison failed to render aid when they discovered him in his cell bleeding. My investigation not only revealed that he was improperly placed in with the general population against a judge's order and a court-ordered psychiatrist order...but he was also mistakenly given razors as part of a hygiene kit.