Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "putin" ...

  • State-Run Doping

    A shocking description of Russia’s state-run doping program, in vivid detail that even Moscow no longer disputes. Putin was forced to crack down.
  • Panama Papers

    The Panama Papers investigation reveals the offshore links of some of the globe’s most prominent figures. The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, German newspaper Suddeutsche Zeitung and more than 100 other media partners spent a year sifting through 11.5 million leaked files to expose the hidden financial dealings of world leaders, fraudsters, gangsters, drug traffickers, billionaires, celebrities, sports stars and more. The investigation revealed companies that helped fuel Syria’s deadly air war and a network of people close to Russian President Vladimir Putin that secretly moved as much as $2 billion through banks and offshore companies.
  • Panama Papers

    The Panama Papers investigation, based on a massive leak of secret offshore records, exposed shell companies linked to 140 politicians in more than 50 countries – including 12 current or former world leaders. The investigation also exposed offshore companies tied to mega-banks, bribery scandals, drug kingpins, American fraudsters, arms traffickers and a network of people close to Russian President Vladimir Putin that shuffled as much as $2 billion around the world. The project was led by the Center for Public Integrity's International Consortium of Investigative Journalists and involved more than 100 news organizations from 80 countries. In all, more than 370 journalists were involved in the collaboration.
  • Selfie Soldiers: Russia's Army Checks In To Ukraine

    As the conflict in Ukraine continues, so too does Russian President Vladimir Putin's denial of any Russian involvement. But a recent report from think tank the Atlantic Council used open source information and social media to find evidence of Russian troops across the border. Using the Atlantic Council's methodology, VICE News correspondent Simon Ostrovsky follows the digital and literal footprints of one Russian soldier, tracking him from eastern Ukraine to Siberia, to prove that Russian soldiers are fighting in Ukraine. https://news.vice.com/video/selfie-soldiers-russia-checks-in-to-ukraine
  • Comrade Capitalism

    In these investigations, Reuters revealed how Putin’s daughter secretly married the son of an old friend of the president; how Putin’s new son-in-law went on to acquire a stake worth $2.85 billion in Russia’s biggest petrochemical processor; how that stake was financed by a cheap loan from a bank run by associates of Putin; and how the petrochemical company is now benefiting from $1.75 billion in cheap state finance. While much has been written about other Russian billionaires, no one has previously succeeded in shedding so much light on the finances of the president’s family. Former KGB officer Putin has long claimed to be a man of modest means, a frugal figure atop the former communist country now plundered by crony capitalism. http://www.reuters.com/investigates/section/comrade-capitalism-2015/
  • The Russian Laundromat

    Call it the Laundromat. It’s a complex system for laundering more than $20 billion in Russian money stolen from the government by corrupt politicians or earned through organized crime activity. It was designed to not only move money from Russian shell companies into EU banks through Latvia, it had the added feature of getting corrupt or uncaring judges in Moldova to legitimize the funds. The state-of-the-art system provided exceptionally clean money backed by a court ruling at a fraction of the cost of regular laundering schemes. It made up for the low costs by laundering huge volumes. The system used just one bank in Latvia and one bank in Moldova but 19 banks in Russia, some of them controlled by rich and powerful figures including the cousin of Russian President Vladimir Putin.
  • Money Where Your Mouth Is - Portland's Fluoride Fight

    It would be May of 2013 when Portland residents were asked to decide an issue most major metropolitan areas had decided back in the ‘50s – should we add fluoride to the city’s drinking water supply? Determined to go beyond campaign sound bites, KATU Consumer Investigator Shellie Bailey-Shah sought to uncover scientific proof - either supporting or disputing the argument that fluoridated water would lead to fewer cavities in children. Crunching the state of Oregon’s raw data in more logical ways than the state itself had ever considered, Bailey-Shah provided voters with hyper-local evidence that fluoride would not, in fact, improve their children’s dental health. Moreover, Bailey-Shah revealed how the state – a strong political and financial supporter of the community fluoridation campaign – stonewalled efforts to bring these new revelations to light.
  • The Return

    The first hand account of Russia's transition from communism since 1985 involved detailed reporting and analysis spanning a period of more than two decades. Major findings include the sources of President, and then Prime Minister, Vladimir Putin's popularity and reasons for Russia's descent into economic depression in the 1990s and recovery after 1999.
  • "Shorting Cramer" and "Financial Journalsim with R"

    This series examines the investment recommendations by Jim Cramer, celebrity analyst and host of CNBC's show "Mad Money." The reporters tested more than 4,000 of Cramer's recommendations from the past 2 years; the investigation found that Cramer's recommendations did not beat the market at all. In fact, viewers would actually do better by betting against Cramer's recommendations. "Financial Journalism with R" is a continuation of the story, explaining data munging and analysis in the refereed statistical computing publication R News.
  • Trapped for Cash

    In Utah the "payday loan" industry is flourishing. These payday loan stores intentionally trap and drain those people desperate for cash. The industry is growing exponentially in areas that are poor, heavily Hispanic or near military bases. Utah banks and credit unions' campaign donations keep the legislature from puting limits on interest rates.