Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

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  • The Center for Public Integrity: Abandoned in America

    President Donald Trump has declared the United States’ economy to be “the best economy we've ever had in the history of our country.” His administration likewise declared the nation’s decades-long war on poverty “largely over and a success.” So during the summer of 2018, Center for Public Integrity reporters visited six communities where residents say the crushing effects of poverty and government neglect aren’t improving — they’ve gone from bad to worse. Problems range from broken education systems to unlivable housing to infrastructure fit for the third world. One factor bound them together: a profound lack of political clout on the eve of the 2018 midterm election that would determine the balance of power in Washington. Our work led to the publishing of “Abandoned in America” — a six-part, 27,000-word series published over two weeks during October 2018.
  • The Orange County Register: Rehab Riviera

    Our Rehab Riviera series continued to probe the dark side of addiction treatment in California in 2018, documenting sexual assault inside rehabs and how sober homes make their money. Our work changed state and local laws, spawned a task force and arrests, and sparked Congressional Committee hearings and investigations.
  • The Daily Beast: Pay Dirt

    Pay Dirt is a weekly newsletter covering campaign finance, political influence, and corruption. These six stories, each of which led the newsletter for that day, covered a range of topics that shed light on the special interests trying to buy elections and influence American policymaking.
  • Orange County Register/Southern California News Group: Olympic sports sex abuse

    This Is the Orange County Register’s investigation into decades of sexual abuse within American Olympic sports, the culture that enabled that abuse and the lengths top officials and coaches have taken to cover up that abuse leaving unsuspecting young athletes still vulnerable to predatory coaches and officials.
  • Full Measure: Asking for a Friend: The Shocking Herpes Vaccine Experiments

    The FDA has reportedly opened a criminal investigation into the researcher behind one of the strangest medical stories you may hear in some time. It has to do with an experimental herpes vaccine, unconventional research methods, and a lesson in the things desperation can drive people to do.
  • Born on Drugs

    What happens to children who are born drug-exposed - and what happens to their parents? Over the course of the generation spanning “crack babies” to “heroin babies,” California and the nation have made legal and philosophical shifts, removing fewer drug-exposed children from their parents’ care and working harder to make fractured families whole again. Sometimes, it works. Most often, it doesn’t.
  • Alabama Media Group: Dirty Business

    In 2017, federal prosecutors charged Balch & Bingham lawyer Joel Gilbert and Drummond vice president David Roberson with bribing state Rep. Oliver Robinson to help them fight the EPA. However, as Whitmire revealed, their astroturfing scheme went much further, involving public officials from a school superintendent to U.S. senators. When Whitmire requested records from the Alabama Attorney General's Office showing Luther Strange's role in the scheme, the office denied those records existed. Whitmire proved, not once but twice, that officials there were lying, and that Strange had put his name on Gilbert's work product to persuade the EPA not to help poor residents in north Birmingham clean their soil of toxins. Further, Whitmire showed a small local school district had agreed to help resist the EPA, too, denying EPA access to test schoolyards for toxins.
  • Election Integrity: The Southern Vote Project

    In our groundbreaking, exclusive, “flood-the-zone” Southern Vote Project, WhoWhatWhy probed the state of election integrity and revealed deep problems, including widespread disenfranchisement of large segments of the voting public. Sending a full-time team to several southern states, we documented a broad range of factors, some seemingly intentional, that resulted in voter suppression or created cybersecurity vulnerabilities. Because we were uniquely focused on this topic, we started breaking stories that other outlets were unwilling or unable to pursue. Our work played an important role in compelling legacy news outlets to begin covering this issue. Our hard-hitting coverage also resulted in several lawsuits, which in turn brought about changes in how votes were counted through court decisions made in the heat of the elections.
  • #MeToo Unmasks the Open Secret of Sexual Abuse in Yoga

    A KQED callout for #MeToo accounts in the Bay Area yoga world and our ensuing nine-month investigation revealed a range of allegations by seven women against five teachers: from inappropriate massage to a violating touch in class, from drugging to sex with a minor. I found that the yoga community is struggling to rein in this sexual misconduct and abuse in its ranks. Some experts believe the lack of oversight of teachers and schools is adding to the problems of an industry experiencing explosive growth, where touch and trust are a fundamental part of the practice.
  • Who Guards the Guardians

    This series was developed to give the public an insider's view into a taxpayer funded court system that can do irreparable harm after it is asked to help. It is the section of the court that deals with families bickering over what do to with an aging, ailing Mom or Dad. Judges in these courts have extraordinary powers to strip the elderly of their civil rights, push family members aside and appoint strangers to act as personal and financial guardians for the newly proclaimed “ward of the court.” In the process the guardians can – and do – ignore carefully prepared estate plans and wills, bypassing the expressed wishes of the elder. It is a growing nationwide problem which will only become more pervasive as the U.S. population continues to grow older. This series focuses on the especially secretive system in place in New Mexico.