Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "rapists" ...

  • WEWS-TV: Evading Justice

    The Ohio sex offender registry is supposed to help keep the public safe by providing access to information about convicts who have committed serious sexual offenses. But our extensive six-month-long investigation uncovered a loophole used by prosecutors and judges in one of the largest counties in the state that results in many accused rapists evading the registry. We found oftentimes the justice system allows suspects charged with rape to plead down to lesser and even completely unrelated charges – in a three-year period, there were more than 100 accused rapists who pleaded guilty to abduction, assault and endangering children, which allowed them to avoid registering as sex offenders. We also found many of those same defendants went on to be charged with another sexual offense after they evaded the registry, showing how this practice can put the public at risk.
  • Star Tribune: Denied Justice

    “Denied Justice” documented widespread failings in how Minnesota’s criminal justice system investigated and prosecuted sexual assault cases, depriving victims of justice, endangering the public and allowing rapists to go unpunished.
  • Denied Justice

    “Denied Justice” exposed widespread failings in how Minnesota’s criminal justice system investigated and prosecuted sexual assault cases, depriving victims of justice, endangering the public and allowing rapists to go unpunished.
  • Missed Treatment: Soldiers With Mental Health Issues Dismissed For ‘Misconduct’

    We revealed for the first time that the Army has kicked out tens of thousands of soldiers who came back from Iraq and Afghanistan with mental health problems and traumatic brain injuries, and taken away their benefits, on the grounds that those soldiers committed some sort of “misconduct”– despite the fact that Congress passed a law in 2009 to try to prevent it. Our stories were not only the first ones that revealed this crucial information: Army officials told us that until we asked and pushed for these statistics under FOIA, they never compiled them, period.Our report also showed that a top-level Army investigation, into allegations that soldiers were being mistreated, was essentially a whitewash. And we let the public hear, for the first time, actual psychotherapy sessions between a troubled soldier and Army psychiatrists. You can actually hear the therapists belittle the soldier and shrug off his mental health problems. http://www.npr.org/2015/10/28/451146230/missed-treatment-soldiers-with-mental-health-issues-dismissed-for-misconduct
  • Investigating Rape

    Much has been written on the topic of rape in America. This series differed in that it focused on law enforcement agencies. We wanted to hold police accountable for their investigations of sexual assault — a crime that annually afflicts hundreds of thousands of victims, mostly women, but has a far lower arrest rate than other violent crimes such as murder or aggravated assault. Through interviews, police reports, public records, database queries and case studies, we discovered simple, immediate techniques that police could use to improve rape investigations. We found that police routinely failed to talk with neighboring jurisdictions in solving rape crimes, even though studies have shown that rapists often have a history of sexual assault. We showed that a simple phone call to check with other police agencies where the suspect lived can turn up corroborating evidence — but that such calls are rarely made.
  • Under The Radar

    In an exhaustive, unprecedented review of more than 1,300 military court martial cases the Scripps Washington Bureau discovered at least 242 convicted military rapists, child molesters, and other sex offenders have fallen under the radar and slipped through what a member of the House Armed Services Committee calls a “gaping loophole” in the system. Scripps discovered some military sex offenders go on to re-offend in heinous ways on unsuspecting victims in the civilian world.
  • CBS News: Rape Kit Investigation

    Following the CBS News series that exposed more than 20,000 untested rape kits nationwide, Nancy Cordes revisited the Cleveland Police Department which told CBS they “had no idea how many kits they had and would not count.” Since this piece, they have found over 5,000 untested kits. A new county prosecutor, Tim McGinty, met with the State Attorney General to get funding to test ALL of the kits and conceded that mistakes were made and urged officials to dig into the “goldmine” of kits. After testing half of the kits they indicted over 200 rapists, a third of them are serial rapists. Our story broke the news that other cities had major problems with untested kits. We partnered with Joyful Heart Foundation to test all kits to break the news that some cities test 100% of their kits, but Las Vegas only tested 15% and Tulsa, Oklahoma has 3,400 untested kits. Since our story, Nevada Attorney General, Adam Laxalt, announced plans to tackle the backlog as one of his tasks in the New Year.
  • Sexual Assault Data

    Sexual assault on campuses has been a hot-button issue for more than a year, and The Daily Tar Heel is constantly looking for ways to uncover new information. For months, editors at the newspaper pushed for data regarding the adjudication of sexual assault. This request was finally granted in fall 2014, and my story is the result of these public records. They felt this story was important to tell because many people wonder why colleges handle the punishment of this violent crime. But the story used data and experts from both the university and criminal justice system to show how both sides struggle to adjudicate sexual assault. In addition, the story explored how sexual assault survivors rely on having a multitude of options to keep them safe on campus. However, that system only works if student rapists are actually punished for their crimes.
  • Under The Radar: A Scripps Washington Bureau Investigation of Military Sex Offenders After They Leave The Brig

    Under The Radar: A Scripps Washington Bureau Investigation In an exhaustive, unprecedented review of more than 1,300 military court martial cases the Scripps Washington Bureau discovered at least 242 convicted military rapists, child molesters, and other sex offenders have fallen under the radar and slipped through what a member of the House Armed Services Committee calls a “gaping loophole” in the system. Scripps discovered some military sex offenders go on to re-offend in heinous ways on unsuspecting victims in the civilian world. The Scripps investigation, “Under The Radar” has triggered action at the national, state and local level after exposing several major problems when convicted military sex offenders are returned to civilian life.
  • Sex Predators Unleashed

    A 1999 Florida law passed after a 9-year-old boy was raped and murdered is supposed to protect the public by keeping the most dangerous sex predators locked up after their prison sentences end. But a Sun Sentinel investigation found the state’s safeguards broke down at every stage, setting rapists and child molesters free to harm again. Investigative reporter Sally Kestin and database specialist Dana Williams mined multiple data sources, using the state’s own records to reveal a horrific picture of recurring tragedy. The failures they uncovered prompted lawmakers to initiate the most comprehensive overhaul of Florida’s sex offender laws in more than a decade.