Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "recruitment" ...

  • Comfort Women: Ep1. War Crime, Ep2.The Nation Gave Them Up

    For the 73rd anniversary of the National Liberation Day of Korea, this program aims to report the Japanese government’s denial of forced recruitment comfort women and operation of comfort station by the Japanese military during the Japanese ruling of Korea. This program also traces the whereabouts of the 20 Korean comfort women found in Myitkyina, Myanmar, to suggest how to solve the current comfort women issues. Through the recorded voice files of the interrogations of 4 Japanese officers and soldiers, this program analyses their views on comfort women. The program also found out that Japanese military was solely responsible for forced recruitment and control of comfort women, and the establishment and operation of comfort stations through 783 interrogation reports about 1105 Japanese POW during the three years from 1942. Also, the program offers plans on how to solve the comfort women issue such as international solidarity measures by tracing the 20 Korean comfort women that were dragged to Myitkyina, Myanmar, by the Japanese military to find out whether they are still alive or where they have died, and what our government has done for them.
  • CareerSource Tampa Bay

    The Tampa Bay Times first raised questions about the accuracy of job placement figures that CareerSource Pinellas and CareerSource Tampa Bay reported to the state of Florida and later showed how both jobs centers took credit for thousands of hires they had nothing to do with, entered fake phone numbers into a reporting system and issued bonuses to recruiters based on those inflated figures.
  • Teen to Terrorist

    KSTP's exclusive interview with a convicted terrorist who was a former ISIS recruit and one of the most high profile terrorist defendants in the federal government's most significant and largest terror recruiting case in the country gave them unprecedented insight into how and why ISIS is successfully recruiting young Somali-American men.
  • Informants

    “Informants” tells the stories of three paid FBI informants who posed as Muslims as they searched for people interested in joining violent plots concocted by the FBI. With extraordinary access to FBI agents and their informants, as well as undercover recordings, Al Jazeera’s documentary raises questions about whether the men targeted would have acted at all were it not for the paid informants working on the cases. It also brings into question one of the government’s favored domestic counter-terrorism tools after 9/11. The film features never-before-seen video from FBI undercover sting operations and interviews with three former FBI informants; reveals new information about the crimes FBI informants committed while working for the government; exposes how the FBI targeted one young man for recruitment as an informant; features an exclusive interview with a man convicted on terrorism charges in one of the highest-profile federal cases of the last decade; and reveals the identity of one of the FBI’s secret informants. “Informants” is an evocative documentary that breaks new ground covering and questioning U.S. national security policy.
  • Fire Academy Diversity

    WBAL-TV exposed the fact that the Baltimore City Fire Department had abandoned its policy regarding recruitment designed to make the agency more diverse. The department has a history of overlooking minorities in recruiting and promotions. 63.2% of Bailtimore is African-American, but out of a 45 class of cadets, only 5 were African-American and 3 were women.
  • Botched Sting

    This story exposed how local Florida police cost a young woman her life by manipulating her into working an undercover sting, then botching the operation. Rachel Hoffman was a typical American college student who was also twice arrested for possession of small amounts of marijuana. Scared and facing jail time, Rachel agreed to be a police informant. Police told here that no charges would be filed, that prosecutors would never know and that they would protect her. Only after her death, and following this investigation, did the police admit that their recruitment of Rachel Hoffman violated their own policies.
  • Dishonorable Deceptions

    NewsChannel 5 found that the "U.S. Army recruits soldiers with a known history of mental illness."
  • Gangs in the Military

    Gang activity in the military is on the rise. This "coincides with the increase in military recruits with a criminal history. Since 2003, in order to meet recruitment goal, 125,000 recruits with criminal backgrounds have been granted waiver for felonies, including robbery and assault, so they can join up."
  • Justice at War

    After analyzing the Army Court-Martial Management Information system database it was found that soldiers who broke military rules were more likely to face charges than those who violated civilian law. These violations were mainly aimed at Iraqi civilians and included robbing , kidnaping and killing them. Also it was found that the Army's recruitment has enlisted men of questionable background. Some of these men would not be hired by other law enforcement groups such as the police, due to their criminal records.
  • An Army of Anyone

    The author investigated recruitment procedures for the Army and found the checks and balances to be wanting. He also found that the Army is so desperate for soldiers that it has become an army of anyone.