Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "registry" ...

  • WEWS-TV: Evading Justice

    The Ohio sex offender registry is supposed to help keep the public safe by providing access to information about convicts who have committed serious sexual offenses. But our extensive six-month-long investigation uncovered a loophole used by prosecutors and judges in one of the largest counties in the state that results in many accused rapists evading the registry. We found oftentimes the justice system allows suspects charged with rape to plead down to lesser and even completely unrelated charges – in a three-year period, there were more than 100 accused rapists who pleaded guilty to abduction, assault and endangering children, which allowed them to avoid registering as sex offenders. We also found many of those same defendants went on to be charged with another sexual offense after they evaded the registry, showing how this practice can put the public at risk.
  • IRW: The Boy on the Bus

    The Investigative Reporting Workshop found deep cracks in the registry system for sex offenders that allow predators to move, skip registration, and begin new lives under the radar in a new neighborhood — unless they are arrested again. The story was published with IowaWatch.
  • 12 News I-Team: Predators in Plain Sight

    In this 12 News I-Team report, were looking at protecting our most precious resource, our children. Arizona families rely on the state sex offender registry to keep them informed on whether a sex offender lives in their neighborhood or has recently moved in.
  • Busted! Breast Cancer, Money and the Media

    On Nov. 5, 2015, the Point Reyes Light launched an investigative series on a breast cancer scare that never should have happened. “Busted! Breast cancer, money and the media” dives into the question of who is most at risk of breast cancer. Hint: Contrary to popular belief, it is not wealthy white women. Focused on Marin County, Calif. and similarly affluent communities, the weekly series demystifies how breast cancer risk is calculated and explains how researchers and the media exaggerate risk factors, spreading unwarranted fear of the disease. In the 10-part serial, reporter Peter Byrne explains how scientific data have been manipulated to promote non-scientific agendas to the detriment of women in underserved populations. “Busted!” reveals internal audits showing that data in the California Cancer Registry is not of research quality. The series details how cancer registry officials attempted to derail the investigation. Busted! is changing the conversation about breast cancer risk and policy in the San Francisco Bay Area, and, hopefully, around the nation.
  • Left for Dead and the interactive database, The Lost & The Found

    Left for Dead is the first national examination of Jane and John Does and the failures of sheriffs and coroners to identify unclaimed and unnamed bodies – a problem the Department of Justice has called “the nation’s silent mass disaster.” G.W. Schulz’s exhaustive reporting exposed the challenges of identifying them. Those challenges, he found, range from neglect, indifference and a lack of will by local authorities, to three unsuccessful attempts in the U.S. Congress to require police and death investigators to use an existing national registry of missing people. Following his reporting, the bill was reintroduced this year. Reveal obtained federal data that tracks unidentified bodies, which informed our reporting. We also built an online tool for matching missing people with unidentified bodies.
  • House Stealing Investigation Changes State Law

    Our investigation revealed rampant criminal activity among opportunists trying to capitalize on loopholes in Georgia law and ultimately led to a change in the law, the creation of a fraud registry, and the indictment of eight people. Four years earlier, we had already exposed another group's efforts to steal empty homes by filing false deeds however several members of the racketeering enterprise were acquitted, which exposed legal flaws. Our latest investigation spotlighted how a few members of the group were able to expand their enterprise to target regular homeowners rather than foreclosures, and steal some of the very homes for which they'd previously been arrested. Once we approached legislators about the loopholes, they fast-tracked new legislation to make this activity a felony.
  • "The Secret Registry"

    For ten years, police in Stockholm registered thousands of women who have reported being abused and threatened. Swedish Radio reveals a secret database filled with sensitive information and offensive judgements about the women. Many of the registered are branded by the police as “mytomanic”, "tricky" and "probably insane".
  • CA Investigation: Family custody battle exposes flaws in child protection system

    As four children slept, their parents were murdered in an adjacent room of their Memphis home in April, launching a controversial custody dispute that remains pending on appeal. The child welfare worker and the guardian ad litem either didn't conduct thorough investigations of those seeking custody of the children or they failed to brief the magistrate during a hearing that was rushed to an end. The story provides a rare look at how quickly child custody disputes can be decided in dependency and neglect cases, which by state law are closed to the public and media. The newspaper also exposed exclusions in the state's Sex Offender Registry laws that allow offenders, even those classified as "violent," to live in homes with children if the offender's victim was an adult.
  • A Failure to Block: Tennessee's Lost War on Meth

    While Tennessee remains second in the nation for the number of meth labs, this investigation revealed a state system designed to block convicted meth offenders from buying cold medicines containing pseudoephedrine was broken, and that there were huge holes in the TBI’s Meth Offender Registry, a list of people who should be banned from such purchases. The stories led to immediate action by the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation and a rare admission by the agency that it had failed to follow the law. Among our findings was that 777 convicted meth offenders made more than 5,400 illegal purchases of pseudoephedrine last year. Despite strict laws requiring people to show their driver’s license when they buy the cold medicines, we found nearly one of every five people on the TBI’s Meth Offender Registry was still able to buy pseudoephedrine without using a fake ID.
  • Packing heat: How gun law loopholes tripled Canada’s rifle magazine limits

    Gun control has been in the news on both sides of the border - even as legislation goes in different directions. Canada just destroyed its long-gun registry, even as police officers who relied on its data called for its preservation. But here, we focused on the implications of failing to update gun laws for 20-odd years: Namely, such neglect creates unforeseen, potentially lethal loopholes that - for example - triple the legal magazine limit. But it's one thing to write about this. We went one better, obtaining dummy ammunition and a magazine cartridge to demonstrate in video online the ways in which outdated laws can be used against the public good.