Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "rehab" ...

  • STLPR: McKee's broken promises

    Nearly a decade after Paul McKee sold St. Louis on a vision worth billions to rehab more than 150 properties on the city’s north side, roofs have caved, walls have crumbled and residents have lost patience — and hope. This story looks at how this happened, what the implications are and who is impacted.
  • The Orange County Register: Rehab Riviera

    Our Rehab Riviera series continued to probe the dark side of addiction treatment in California in 2018, documenting sexual assault inside rehabs and how sober homes make their money. Our work changed state and local laws, spawned a task force and arrests, and sparked Congressional Committee hearings and investigations.
  • Heroin: Killer of a generation

    Confronted by a nationwide heroin epidemic in a county known as the nation's rehab capital, The Palm Beach Post exposed the sordid underbelly of the unregulated sober home business, identified bogus addiction treatment lab tests and created the state’s first and only cost analysis of the heroin epidemic. The Post's reporting culminated with publication of the photographs and mini-profiles of all of the 216 people who died from heroin-related overdoses in Palm Beach County in 2015. Federal and state officials arrested sober home operators, and county, state and federal lawmakers pledged action to curb the epidemic and treatment abuses. http://apps.mypalmbeachpost.com/ourdead/
  • How the Government Put Tens of Thousands of People at Risk of a Deadly Disease

    An in-depth investigation into valley fever in California prisons and how the state put tens of thousands of people at risk of a deadly disease. Major findings include evidence that the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation did little to mitigate the problem, ignored data and internal reports suggesting the disease affected people of color more seriously and quashed a federal study of the epidemic within state prisons.
  • Addiction Treatment: Inside the gold rush

    Flying beneath the radar, Palm Beach County’s thriving addiction treatment industry, one of the nation’s largest, is exploiting vulnerable addicts seeking help, gouging insurers and families and engaging in fraud, all in pursuit of outlandish profits from simple drug screen tests. The Palm Beach Post exposed industry practices as an FBI task force secretly gathered evidence toward indictments still not issued as of January 2016. The Post exposed out-of-control sober home operators Ken Bailynson and Kenny Chatman and gave the community its first look deep into the industry’s sordid underbelly. https://github.com/PalmBeachPost/postgeo https://github.com/PalmBeachPost/dbfs2csv
  • Profiting from Addiction

    Drug addicts and homeless people seeking a way out in New York are instead being referred to unregulated, decrepit “three-quarter” houses, where they are often exposed to unscrupulous operators, some of whom require they attend rehabilitation classes of the operators’ choosing, even if it means relapsing to be able to keep a bed.
  • A Mountain of Misconduct

    For "A Mountain of Misconduct", Reveal teamed up with New Hampshire Public Radio health and science reporter Jack Rodolico to unveil 40 years of alleged abuse and neglect of people with disabilities at specialty rehab centers in multiple states. In our hour-long audio documentary, we took a close look at New Hampshire’s Lakeview NeuroRehabilitation Center, where people with severe disabilities were treated, and detailed that facility’s deep ties to a network of institutions across the U.S. Our reporting went back decades to look at the corrupt roots of the multibillion dollar brain injury rehabilitation industry in the 1970's and 80's, and exposed how for-profit neurological rehabilitation centers thrive on public dollars with little oversight. Additional content on the project includes a podcast extra, following up with one family who pulled their son from Lakeview after he was neglected there; a 4,000 word print piece detailing the "human trafficking", to borrow a term one disability rights expert used, that sends vulnerable people across state lines to distant facilities, and the weak state regulation that allowed Lakeview and similar institutions to prosper despite decades of complaints; and a digital interactive timeline featuring the characters in our story, from facility owners to investigators to patients, and how their lives intersected over 40 years.
  • Florida’s Foreclosure Crisis

    Florida homeowners are being steamrolled through foreclosure courts by overzealous judges, while others are left holding the bag for abandoned and unlivable homes, because state officials have placed expedience over the right to due process in an effort to clear a perceived backlog in court cases. The Center for Public Integrity interviewed dozens of homeowners, lawyers, judges and public officials, observed courtrooms, and examined databases and documents to paint a picture of a foreclosure crisis that persists years after the financial crisis. The project resulted in Wells Fargo, one of the biggest mortgage lenders, rehabbing dozens of abandoned homes it owns, and state officials looking at ways to make the state courts more responsive to the needs of homeowners.
  • There’s not a list

    Under Colorado’s “lifetime” sentencing laws, sex offenders were supposed to remain in prison until they successfully completed a rigorous mental/behavioral health program. The intent was to fully rehabilitate them and prevent recidivism. Through months of research, 9Wants to Know also uncovered names of offenders who committed new sex crimes after release. Even after we provided those names to DOC, a prison official publicly claimed, “There’s not a list,” and the recidivism rate was zero. As a result of our investigation, DOC could no longer be in denial. The sex offender treatment program manager was replaced, and prison officials are changing the program rules and asking for more state funding.
  • Bound and Punished

    Arkansas law prohibits punishment of juvenile delinquents, requiring instead that child offenders be provided treatment, rehabilitation and safe environments. But at the Yell County Juvenile Detention Center, where hundreds of children have been sent for years, punishment was not only allowed, top administrators encouraged it. State officials responsible for assuring the safety and well-being of youth in county-run detention centers learned of this routine mistreatment only after the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette shared internal incident reports with them.