Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "restaurant" ...

  • 60 Minutes: The Spotted Pig

    Anderson Cooper speaks to restaurant workers who say they were sexually harassed or assaulted at the stylish New York eatery called "The Spotted Pig." At the heart of the accusations are the restaurant's owner Ken Friedman and celebrity Chef Mario Batali.
  • Amarillo Economic Development Corporation Travel Expenses

    This series looks at travel expenses from the Amarillo Economic Development Corporation (AEDC) during a three-year period. The AEDC is mostly funded with taxpayer money with the Amarillo city council approving the almost $2 million operating budget. The findings include luxury hotel expenses, purchases of alcohol, meals at high-end restaurants, late check-out fees and rounds of golf. Some receipts were hand-written, unreadable or not itemized. There is little to no oversight of these expenses either by the organization or the city. The AEDC has no “written” policies on travel and the president approves his own expenses. Many of the meals, trips and rounds of golf are considered an investment, but there is no record of who attended because the AEDC says the deals are confidential. The organization has existed for 26 years but has brought in 34 businesses during that time to Amarillo.
  • The Bandidos and the Waco Melee

    After rival bikers and police engaged in a deadly shootout at a Waco restaurant, many questions lingered about what prompted the fight, who fired the fatal shots and why so many were arrested - even seemingly innocent. But police and prosecutors stopped talking and a judge imposed a gag order Most reporters let the story drop - but not Houston Chronicle Reporter Dane Schiller, a long-time organized crime specialist. His doggedness resulted in a series of stories – significant take-outs and regular blog posts - that shed light on the bad blood between biker gangs, raised questions about how police overreacted to the gathering and exposed the weaknesses of the charges against many of those arrested.
  • Hattiesburg taxpayers fund liquor, jewelry, and gifts

    WDAM uncovered misspending of taxpayer dollars at the Hattiesburg Tourism Commission. In summary, the city imposes an extra two percent tax on restaurant food purchases in the city to help fund tourism in the area. That money was instead spent on luxury items such as Tiffany jewelry and family vacations by the executive director and several people working for him. https://vimeo.com/151837779 http://www.wdam.com/story/28416053/investigation-hattiesburg-taxpayers-fund-liquor-jewelry-and-gifts
  • Restaurant Inspections

    The publicizing of restaurant inspections across the United States is a common practice. But the Champaign-Urbana Public Health Diistrict - until January 2014 - would only release the results of a restaurant inspection if a member of the public submitted a Freedom of Information request. So after a Hepatitis A outbreak from at a local restaurant, CU-CitizenAccess.org decided it was time to make public the results of inspections of restaurants that failed to meet public health standards. For four years, reporters and student reporters at CU-CitizenAccess.org relentessly filed monthly requests for the inspections of failed restaurant, painstakingly downloading data, and wrote story after story - and last year, public health department finally went public with its restaurant inspections.
  • Most trafficked mammal

    The pangolin -- a little-known, scale-covered mammal -- is thought by scientists to be the most trafficked mammal in the world. Conservationists fear it could go extinct before most people realize it exists. To try to ensure that doesn’t happen, CNN’s John Sutter traveled, at times undercover, to Vietnam and Indonesia to introduce readers and viewers to this loveably introverted creature, and to expose the massive, illegal trade in its meat and scales. Traveling alone, and at times using hidden cameras and recording devices, Sutter met with wildlife traffickers and pangolin in Sumatra, Indonesia. He followed undercover wildlife cops in Hanoi, Vietnam, to a number of restaurants and markets that deal in pangolin products. This work exposed the ease with which pangolin traders are able to operate in these countries, in part because the pangolin has maintained a lower profile than rhinos and elephants. It also helped explain the rise in demand for pangolin scales and meat in Southeast Asia. Sutter’s work also humanized and popularized the pangolin, a creature he described as “elusive, nocturnal, rarely appreciated and barely understood.”
  • Restaurant Inspections

    The publicizing of restaurant inspections across the United States is a common practice. But the Champaign-Urbana Public Health Diistrict - until January 2014 - would only release the results of a restaurant inspection if a member of the public submitted a Freedom of Information request. So after a Hepatitis A outbreak from at a local restaurant, CU-CitizenAccess.org decided it was time to make public the results of inspections of restaurants that failed to meet public health standards. For four years, reporters and student reporters at CU-CitizenAccess.org relentessly filed monthly requests for the inspections of failed restaurant, painstakingly downloading data, and wrote story after story - and last year, public health department finally went public with its restaurant inspections.
  • For Jared Remy, leniency was the rule until one lethal night

    On the morning of Aug. 16, 2013, New England awoke to the horrifying news that Jared Remy – the son of Jerry Remy, a homegrown Red Sox infielder-turned-broadcaster, author, commercial pitchman, and restaurant impresario widely hailed as the “President of Red Sox Nation” – had allegedly stabbed and killed his girlfriend, Jennifer Martel, in a brutal slaying while the two were home with their four-year-old daughter. It soon emerged that the murder came just 36 hours after Jared Remy had been arraigned and released after allegedly slamming Martel’s head into a bathroom mirror in an earlier fight; prosecutors chose not to try to hold him on bail or as a potential danger, putting too much stock in Martel’s decision not to attend the arraignment.
  • Inside Sysco: Where Your Food is Really Coming From

    Sysco Corporation is the world’s largest food distributor. It’s a $43 billion dollar publicly traded corporation that supplies restaurants, hotels, hospitals, schools, and many other food facilities with everything from raw meat and dairy to fruits and vegetables. The company’s motto is “Good Things Come from Sysco.” But this yearlong investigation exposed the company’s widespread practice of storing fresh food in dirty, unrefrigerated, outdoor storage lockers for hours, before it was delivered to unsuspecting customers across Northern California. Employees across the U.S. and Canada later revealed that these sheds were part of the company’s food distribution practices for over a decade. The investigation uncovered a widespread network of sheds in places including Washington, Utah, Illinois, Tennessee, New York, Maryland and the District of Columbia stateside, in addition to Ontario and British Columbia in Canada.
  • Tragedy on the Plaza

    On February 19th, 2013, a landmark Kansas City restaurant exploded and caught fire. Several people were severely injured, and one employee lost her life. Within minutes of the tragedy, the 41 Action News investigative team was on the scene interviewing witnesses, documenting what they saw, and asking city officials tough questions. In the weeks that followed, the team broke nearly every development in the investigation into the tragedy. Their hard work culminated in a one-hour primetime special.