Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "revenue" ...

  • The Texas Observer and Grist with The Investigative Fund: Too Big to Fine, Too Small to Fight Back

    Citgo refineries spew thousands of tons of chemicals into the air, degrading air quality and putting human health at risk. Despite Citgo's revenues hitting north of $40 billion, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality lets the company off easy. For her investigation in The Texas Observer, in partnership with Grist and The Investigative Fund, Naveena Sadasivam dug into how the TCEQ has fined corporate polluters $30 million for air violations, not much more than the $24 million imposed on gas stations, a significant percentage of which are owned by immigrants, just for record-keeping errors. The disparity between TCEQ's treatment of mom-and-pop operations versus large corporations favors those with money and power. The agency rarely punishes big polluters, often because of a legal loophole, and when it does levy a fine, lawyers negotiate big reductions in penalties. As a result, environmental advocates and small business owners say there's a fundamental unfairness at work with the way TCEQ treats the businesses it regulates.
  • The Center for Public Integrity: Wireless Wars: The Fight Over 5G

    One of the largest deployments of wireless technology in decades is occurring as telecommunications companies erect a new network of small cells to support the next generation of wireless communications called 5G. The problem, however, brings these small cells into neighborhoods and business districts, unlike the larger towers seen along highways and in fields far from centers of population. And with it, resistance from citizens. The clash pits telecoms, which want to ease regulations to reduce costs, against local governments and their residents, who want to control the look and placement of the cells and defend revenue and public property rights. The Center reports on how the telecoms are relying on money and tried-and-true relationships with politicians and regulators to get their way. And they are winning.
  • CALmatters: California teacher pension debt swamps school budgets

    California’s tax revenue may be surging thanks to a strong economy, but rapidly rising employee pension costs mean public school budgets are being squeezed.
  • The University of Louisville Foundation Bought An Empty Factory In Oklahoma—Because A Donor Asked

    Reporter Kate Howard revealed how the University of Louisville’s nonprofit fundraising arm bought an abandoned factory in Oklahoma at the behest of a major donor. The multi-layered $3.47 million-dollar transaction had no academic purpose, did not result in any revenue for the organization and appeared to be an ethical breach and tax code violation.
  • Isis Inc

    The FT’s 'Isis Inc' series is the most difficult, important and revelatory investigation the Financial Times has done in years. It exposed for the first time how the jihadis raise - and spend - their money and run their affairs. It also underlined the failure of the western air campaign to dent its organization and revenues. The power of the reporting was reinforced by a host of telling graphics and interactives. “How oil fuels terrorists” was our most read story of the year.
  • Profiting from Thrift

    “Profiting from Thrift” by Francesca Lyman is an investigation into how the privately held Savers chain of thrift stores, with hundreds of stores in 30 states, plus Canada and Australia, has profited from a charitable veneer, misleading consumers, drawing the ire of regulators, and even drawing revenue away from public tax coffers. For years the company has been the single largest player in the prosperous and growing industry of for-profit thrift stores, doing $1.2 billion in business annually, but InvestigateWest reporting found its claims about doing good for charities appear to be vastly overblown. http://invw.org/2015/10/28/map-savers-has-stores-in-29-states-across-the-u-s/
  • Citation Nation

    In our investigation Citation Nation, we exposed Colorado municipalities aggressively ticketing drivers for financial gain and for survival. In Campo, Colorado we uncovered traffic tickets and court fees bringing in 93% of the town’s revenue. The state average is approximately 4%, based on our extensive analysis of 270 budget reports from every single recognized town and city throughout the state. [https://vimeo.com/150724208] [https://vimeo.com/131464361]
  • PUSHING PAIN: PROFITS BEFORE PATIENTS

    The amount of painkillers dispensed in the U.S. nearly quadrupled from 1999-2010 even though the amount of pain Americans have reported has not changed, resulting in what the Centers for Disease Control and prevention calls an epidemic which takes over twenty thousand lives each year. This was an impetus for Reporter Dina Gusovsky to investigate a publicly traded specialty pharmaceutical company called Insys Therapeutics, which is accused of contributing to these grim statistics. It’s main revenue generating drug is a highly addictive opiate one hundred times more powerful that morphine, which the FDA says should only be used for late stage cancer pain; however, the company is now being investigated in at least six states for pushing the drug far beyond cancer patients, engaging in kickback schemes, off-label marketing, and other illegal business practices all in attempt to grow profits. Two days after our report first aired, which included exclusive interviews with whistleblowers and investigators, the company’s CEO resigned. http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000444339&play=1 http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000445892&play=1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m9Uy3eDqzUc https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JP28vnux3yI https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MXFetMnNJSk
  • Playing in the Red

    Despite years of surging revenue into the top tier of college sports, the NCAA and college sports officials have long said most schools lose money on sports, an argument they use both to argue against having to pay players and to justify the continued need for mandatory student fees to support athletics. This argument is misleading, and ignores an alarming truth about big-time college sports in America: as quickly as extra money flows into a sports department, an athletic director finds something to spend it on.
  • Municipal Court Abuses

    Many municipal courts in St. Louis County, particularly in struggling areas, have become major sources of revenue for their cities. As these towns came to rely more on traffic fines and court fees to fund their operations, people on the bottom income rungs found themselves buried in debt to the courts and facing arrest when they didn't show up for hearings because they couldn't pay. At the same time, the courts corrupted the points system designed to keep bad drivers off the road by turning moving violations into "illegal parking in a park" -- for a fee.