Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "salary" ...

  • California's Teacher Housing

    An EdSource analysis revealed that living where they teach is a fading dream for many California teachers. The analysis of teacher salaries and rents reveals just how crushing California’s housing crisis has become for them. Teachers at the bottom of the salary scale working in the state’s coastal and metro areas are being shut out of affordable housing. Others are also struggling to pay the rent. Rising rents coupled with an ongoing teacher shortage are driving an increasing number of districts to build their own teacher housing.
  • VicAd: Port Politics

    When disgraced former Congressman Blake Farenthold resurfaced as the Calhoun Port Authority's first full-time lobbyist at an annual salary of $160,000, the public was outraged. Farenthold later said in a deposition that he and the port board thought they could weather this initial storm and continue to do business as they always had outside the public view. All other state and national media quickly moved on from the story, but the Victoria Advocate kept digging and found that the public had a lot more to be outraged about.
  • The Daily News: Detective Do-Little

    The Daily News’ investigation into Detective Thomas Rice exposed that he was fabricating fake witness names and addresses and repeatedly using them to close grand larceny cases on a significant scale in the Ozone Park section of Queens. Instead of being fired, Rice was transferred to another precinct, docked just 20 vacation days, and allowed to keep his detective rank and salary including overtime, while running his snow blowing and power washing company on the side with NYPD approval.
  • The Elite Gender Pay Gap

    Gender disparities in income are greater in many white-collar U.S. professions than blue-collar and don’t lend themselves to legislative remedies. http://graphics.wsj.com/gender-pay-gap/
  • Investigations Into Hartford's Treasurer

    This entry is part of an ongoing investigation into the activity of Hartford, Conn. Treasurer Adam Cloud -- an independently elected public official who has repeatedly blurred the lines between his public duties and his personal gain.
  • Gravity Payments' CEO Dan Price

    When Gravity Payments’ CEO Dan Price repeated false claims to reporter Karen Weise that he'd been sued by his Gravity co-founder and brother after his sensational announcement to raise employees’ minimum salary to $70,000, Weise suspected there was much more to the story that had made him an instant icon. In “Hero?” Weise masterfully tells the story of how Price used the media to build himself up, and, through dogged reporting, reveals what scores of other news organizations missed.
  • Pay inequality at Ohio University

    This investigative story brought to light the unknown fact of the gender pay inequality at Ohio University. Analyzing salary data requested from OU, the reporter unveiled that not only did female faculty made about 11 percent less than male faculty, they also disproportionately work in non-tenure positions.
  • Public Salary project

    This entry consists of stories culled from a massive request for government compensation from hundreds of government agencies, cities, counties, school, college and special districts. This projects follows the money. The data is made public through data bases on our web sites and culled through by investigative reporter Thomas Peele, who roots out stories from deep in the data, including ones about secret pension boosting perks, officials paid hundreds of thousands of dollars for not working, government managers sitting on huge banks of unused vacation time to cash in at retirement, part-time elected officials who do little work while being paid hundreds of dollars and an hour, long forgotten politicians receiving free life-time government health insurance decades are leaving office. The project routinely ferrets out information about the spending of public money that not even those in charge of government agencies are aware of until Peele tells them: "Wow,” said James Fang, a member of the board of the BART transit district when informed data showed the agencies former general manager, who had resigned two years earlier in the midst if being fired, had remained in the agency's payroll for years, raking in hundreds of thousands of dollars and jacking up her future pension. “She was still on the payroll? I did not know this. It’s startling.”
  • Private Schools

    More than 180 privately run schools in New Jersey promise to take on the severely disabled children that public schools can’t handle, giving them a special status in the Garden State's educational system. But these schools are also a $600 million industry funded by New Jersey taxpayers – an industry that is only loosely regulated by the state. After a two-month investigation, Star-Ledger reporter Christopher Baxter exposed what can happen when the state writes checks to private companies without closely watching what they do with the money. His reporting was a relentless indictment of the system, finding the private schools were able to spend taxpayer dollars in ways public schools could not. He uncovered nepotism among school staffs, executive pay far higher than public school superintendents, officials owning fancy cars, schools offering generous pension plans and questionable business deals between schools and companies owned by school officials. In one instance, Baxter discovered a classroom aide who was related one of the school’s directors was taking home a $94,000 salary – three times what others were paid – without even a bachelor’s degree.
  • 'Totalitarian' culture and pay questions at Upstate hospital

    This story delves into the culture and questionable contracting and compensation practices among senior staff at a major state-run teaching hospital in Syracuse, N.Y. that is also the city's largest employer. It was revealed the president of the State University of New York (SUNY) Upstate Medical University and University Hospital was being compensated by two hospital contractors that nearly doubled his state salary.