Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "seal" ...

  • BuzzFeed News: American Mercenaries

    This was an 8-month investigation that uncovered a privately-run assassination program in Yemen run by American Special Operations veterans and reservists working as mercenaries. Hired by the United Arab Emirates, Americans were sent to kill civilian political leaders from an Islamist party. The team, paid millions of dollars, was made up of about a dozen veterans from the most combat-skilled units America has: former SEALS, former Delta Force, and even former CIA ground branch. It was led by a charismatic former French Foreign Legionnaire who lives in the US suburbs.
  • The Triangle

    “The Triangle” is a five-episode web series that uncovered a more than 4000% increase in heroin-related deaths during the last five years. Our investigation started with a tip that two young people died from overdoses in Atlanta’s wealthy suburbs but no one was talking about it. A team of journalists confirmed that. We also identified a geographic region where the deaths were so hidden even some law enforcement agencies were unable to accurately attribute them to heroin. https://vimeo.com/198370121/dd0b282d3a
  • Charlie Foxtrot

    “Charlie Foxtrot” began as an investigation of a military policy that strips service members of their benefits and veteran status, even after serving in war zones. Our coverage culminated with a screening inside the U.S. Capitol alongside members of the U.S. House and Senate. We focused on a piece of proposed legislation with the power to give service members a second chance. Later that week, the U.S. Senate approved that bill. By year’s end, the Act of Congress was signed in to law by the President. https://vimeo.com/198371721/2d8cedd533
  • Secrets of the SEALs

    The secretive and heralded Navy SEAL units, heroes of operations such as the killing of Osama bin Laden and now called upon more frequently to wage shadow wars, often operate with brutality and impunity, sometimes sabotaging the very missions they were sent to control.
  • The Sting: How the FBI created a terrorist

    With access to sealed FBI transcripts that were placed under a federal protective order, "The Sting" reveals how the FBI entrapped a 27-year-old mentally ill Muslim and Kosovar refugee in a counterterrorism sting. While they publicly described Sami Osmakac as a danger to national security, FBI agents privately called him a "retarded fool" whose targets were "wishy-washy" and provided him with weapons and money that he never would have been able to obtain otherwise. "The Sting" is the first behind-the-scenes account of how the FBI operates its controversial counterterrorism stings, which since 9/11 have been responsible for the conviction on federal terrorism charges of more than 175 Muslims in the United States.
  • Relentless Strike: The Secret History of Joint Special Operations Command

    Relentless Strike is the first full-length history of Joint Special Operations Command (JSOC), the secret military organization that, away from the public eye, has become the military’s main effort in the wars of the 21st century. JSOC runs many of the United States’ most sensitive missions and commands its most secret “special mission units,” including SEAL Team 6, Delta Force and the even more secret “Army of Northern Virginia.” The book contains dozens of scoops and sheds new light on every period of JSOC’s history and virtually every major mission it has conducted. http://www.amazon.com/Relentless-Strike-History-Special-Operations/dp/1250014549/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1452551893&sr=1-1&keywords=Relentless+Strike
  • A "sting" buried

    The Philadelphia Inquirer triggered arrests, legislative reforms, ethics investigations, resignations – and political turmoil statewide – after the newspaper revealed that Pennsylvania’s attorney general had secretly shut down an undercover investigation that had caught public officials on tape taking money or gifts. In late 2013, state Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane secretly shut down a sting operation that had captured officials on tape accepting cash from an operative posing as a lobbyist ostensibly seeking political influence and government contracts. Her decision was kept from the public – restricted under court seal – for months until Inquirer reporters Craig R. McCoy and Angela Couloumbis broke the story. Their initial package sparked a statewide furor – and set the stage for months of additional investigative pieces and news developments.
  • The Dark State

    “The Dark State” was a multi-platform investigation that revealed how law enforcement in Kansas operates in a veil of secrecy unlike any other state due to their ability to keep records sealed. We utilized multiple platforms to tell this challenging story, supplementing our broadcast story online with interactive elements and an online documentary. Through three families, the “Dark State” showed how without open records, law enforcement can operate without fear anyone will question their actions. The series posted online ended up going viral, putting pressure on lawmakers to pass legislation to partially open some records.
  • Tacoma police secretly using controversial cellphone surveillance device

    When police seek a suspect by tracking his or her cellphone signal, ordinary citizens who also have cellphones nearby are often caught in the surveillance web. The (Tacoma) News Tribune spent four months investigating the Tacoma Police Department’s use of this highly technical and secretive device — a decoy cell tower commonly known as a Stingray. After the newspaper confronted the department, Tacoma police became the first in the state to admit they had the device. The News Tribune spent thousands of dollars to unseal court documents that proved police hadn’t been telling judges — who sign off on orders to find suspects by tracking their cellphones — that the police use cell site simulators to find their quarry.
  • Pest Control: Syngenta's Secret Campaign to Silence Atrazine's Critics

    These stories detailed a secret campaign by Syngenta, the Swiss agricultural chemical giant, to spy on and discredit critics of atrazine, its highly profitable weed killer, used on three-quarters of all the corn grown in the United States. The main story was based on roughly 1,000 pages of documents under court seal that 100Reporters obtained under the Freedom of Information laws and a review of financial and other statements of nonprofits that defended and supported use of the herbicide. The company at the time faced a class action lawsuit over contamination of drinking water in six states, and maintained that the cost of clean-up could end atrazine sales in the United States.