Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "segregation" ...

  • Texas Tribune: Blocked Out

    The Texas Tribune revealed how powerful people, from state lawmakers and city officials to politically active neighborhood leaders, have made housing of all kinds harder to find, especially subsidized housing for the state’s poorest residents. And it exposed how those powerful people are enabled by discriminatory state laws and local ordinances that grew from pre-civil rights segregation policies. The result is worsening economic inequality and racial segregation in a growing state that isn't making room fast enough for its exploding population.
  • Kept Out

    Kept Out provided a sweeping indictment of access to credit, showing that millions of Americans are being denied a chance at the American dream simply because of the color of their skin. Because, homeownership is most families’ primary source of wealth, the average white family is now worth 15 times as much as the typical African American one.
  • Last of the Institutions

    “Last of the Institutions” is a multi-part series exposing Washington state’s outdated social policy of continued segregation and isolation of people with a developmental disability through institutionalization. Despite decades of research showing institutionalization is detrimental to people, and the Dept. of Justice’s stance that segregation of the disabled is a form of unlawful discrimination, Washington operates more institutions and houses more people in them than nearly every other state in the country. http://www.king5.com/story/news/local/investigations/2015/12/03/last-institutions/76123472/ https://vimeo.com/k5investigators/last-of-the-institutions
  • School Desegregation Orders

    The highest performing school district in the state of Florida, St. Johns County schools, still has an open desegregation order. I submitted FOI requests with the U.S. Department of Education, the U.S. Department of Justice, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Florida and the St. Johns County school district to obtain records and information needed for the story. Records show currently the majority of students in the St. Johns County school district are white but the district is now fully integrated and complies with the federal order. I learned that that the federal government has been inconsistent in its monitoring of the open desegregation orders in Florida. After my story aired, the St. Johns County school district has said they are working with the federal government to have the desegregation order closed.
  • Cruel and Unusual?

    In a five-month investigation, “Cruel and Unusual?,” the Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism’s Bill Lueders identified 40 alleged instances of physical or severe psychological abuse by guards at one state prison, Waupun Correctional Institution. All of the incidents allegedly involved prisoners in the so-called segregation unit. Two-thirds of them involved a single correctional officer.
  • Death of a Nursing Home

    An investigation of the high rate of bankruptcies of nursing homes serving minority and low-income communities shows that their financial problems can be traced back to the low reimbursement rates paid by Medicaid, and that the Medicaid law is based on amendments made to the Social Security Law of 1935 inserted by states’ rights advocates in Congress who wanted to preserve the system of economic exploitation and social segregation of the South.
  • Death Behind Bars

    A Global News investigation revealed that Canada's "psychiatric prisons," home to the penal system's sickest, most vulnerable and most volatile inmates, have the highest death and assault rates of any federal prisons. Designed, theoretically, to provide special care for Canada's growing population of inmates with severe mental illness, these prisons have become little more than warehouses for extremely ill offenders: They're kept in solitary confinement despite overwhelming evidence against it, and, Global News discovered, even so-called "intensive psychiatric care" is little more than segregation by any other name. After refusing to speak with us about this for months, Canada's Public Safety Minister announced a pilot project for two women inmates with mental illness in a groundbreaking facility specially designed for their care and rehabilitation. Global News also reported that, six months later, that pilot project had yet to materialize.
  • Dividing Lines

    This project explored the nature, causes and consequences of political polarization in metropolitan Milwaukee and Wisconsin. It concluded that metropolitan Milwaukee is by some measures the most polarized place in swing-state America; that it has grown more politically segregated with virtually every election cycle since the 1970s; that its voters live overwhelmingly in politically homogenous neighborhoods dominated by a single party; that those communities have been moving systematically in one partisan direction (either red or blue) for more than four decades; that the partisan gap between its urban and outlying communities has been steadily growing; and that this deep and deepening polarization is a consequence of at least three factors: extreme racial segregation, unusually high levels of political engagement and activism; and at least two decades of perpetual partisan conflict and mobilizing as a result of Wisconsin’s political competitiveness, its battleground role in presidential races and the unprecedented turmoil and division over collective bargaining beginning in 2011. We also charted the rise of political segregation nationally, in the ever-growing share of voters in the United States who live in politically one-sided counties. The project also traced the dramatic changes in voting behavior in the state of Wisconsin in recent decades with the demise of ticket-splitting, the rise of extreme party-line voting, and the systematic growth of two political divides – the one between white and nonwhite voters, and the one between densely populated and less densely populated places. The series explored the relationship between Wisconsin’s high and rising political engagement and turnout rates and its deepening partisan divisions. And it explored the consequences of rising polarization and political segregation when it comes to the way campaigns are conducted, the outcomes of elections, the decline in electoral competition, and barriers to regional problem-solving. It found that as a result of partisan and geographic fault lines, the two parties in Wisconsin (and elsewhere) are increasingly drawing their support from different kinds of voters and different kinds of communities, and winning very different kinds of elections.
  • Death Behind Bars

    A Global News investigation revealed that Canada's "psychiatric prisons," home to the federal penal system's sickest, most vulnerable and most volatile inmates, have the highest death and assault rates of any federal correctional facility. Designed, theoretically, to provide special care for Canada's growing population of inmates with severe mental illness, these prisons have become little more than warehouses for extremely ill offenders: They're put in brutal restraints by prison guards ill-equipped to deal with their needs, and lack sufficient access to health-care practitioners; they're kept in solitary confinement despite overwhelming evidence against it, and, Global News discovered, even so-called "intensive psychiatric care" is little more than segregation by any other name. After refusing to speak with us about this for months, Canada's Public Safety Minister announced a pilot project for two women inmates with mental illness in a groundbreaking facility specially designed for their care and rehabilitation. As part of our extensive follow-up to our initial series, Global News also reported that, six months later, that pilot project had yet to materialize.
  • Texas Schools/Racial Divisions

    This was a 6-part series reported and written by students at The University of Texas at Austin and published in The Dallas Morning News (in print and online) and in Reporting Texas (an online news site at The University of Texas at Austin). The series examined the "resegregation" of public schools -- and how little had changed in public schools since the Brown v. Board of Education ruling in the 1950s ordering the end of segregated classrooms. The groundbreaking work involved deep dives into data, pressing public officials for accountability, exploring the inequities in the public education system.