Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "shelter" ...

  • ProPublica and Frontline: The Right To Fail

    As part of a landmark 2014 settlement, hundreds of people with severe mental illness were moved from troubled group homes and into their own “supported housing” apartments. The idea was that, even if they had spent most of their lives in institutions, dependent on others for food, shelter and a medication regimen, a robust safety net of service providers would help them navigate independence. While many reporters have exposed problems at institutions, ProPublica’s Joaquin Sapien and Frontline’s Tom Jennings took an unprecedented look at what has been heralded as the solution — independent housing. They learned that though many are thriving, the sudden shift was sometimes perilous, especially for the most fragile residents.
  • KPCC: Homeless Shelters

    L.A. has the largest population of unsheltered homeless people in the country. Local officials are looking to massively expand shelter space--but KPCC found thousands of existing beds sit empty each night. Why? Our investigation turned up troubling safety and sanitation issues in shelters, as well as a regulatory system ill-equipped to make improvements, let alone manage a successful shelter expansion.
  • Kids on the Line: An investigation into the contractors behind family separation

    As the U.S. government’s family separation policy played out in real time, Reveal’s investigation uncovered major problems with the contractors tasked with caring for immigrant children, including a defense company holding immigrant children in unlicensed facilities -- vacant office buildings in Phoenix without yards, showers or kitchens -- and a Texas shelter drugging immigrant children without their consent.
  • The Innocents: How U.S. Immigration Policy Punishes Migrant Children

    Federal immigration policies that separated children from their families at the U.S.-Mexico border had real, traumatic consequences on the most vulnerable members of our society. This series of exclusive investigations identified “tender age shelters” warehousing babies and toddlers, exposed a Virginia shelter where migrant teenagers described horrific abuse and followed a Salvadoran mother who came close to losing her daughter to adoption, revealing the legal possibility that separated children could be permanently taken from their parents. AP also followed the money, highlighting the billion-dollar business in migrant child detention, a sector that has grown tenfold in the last decade. Just before year’s end, AP broke the news that the government was keeping most of the 14,000 migrant kids in its care in shelters with hundreds of others, despite expert warnings that mass institutionalization can cause life-long trauma. Based on deep source reporting and exclusive data, the story was the first to provide the number of children in every government-contracted detention center, shelter and foster care program dating back to 2017 - data the government had been withholding all year.
  • Charity Caught on Camera

    As an Indiana charity collected $7 million in donations, this undercover WTHR investigation exposed stunning mismanagement that violated public trust. Months of surveillance and undercover video revealed (literally) tons of food and donations intended for the homeless shelter never made it to the homeless at all. Instead, much of the food went directly to the charity’s leaders – some of the most respected and powerful clergy in the community – who took the food for themselves, their friends, their family members, and even for their pets. The managerial abuses, neglect and dangerous living conditions uncovered by WTHR’s 13 Investigates team prompted immediate resignations, ongoing local and state investigations, and significant changes to protect the charity’s homeless residents and its donors. http://www.wthr.com/tags/grant-county-rescue-mission-13-investigates
  • Philly's Invisible Youth

    In a major multimedia investigation for Al Jazeera America, Laura Rena Murray writes about the alarming increase of homeless youth in Philadelphia and the utter failure of the child welfare agency and the emergency shelter system to care for them. By 2011, one in 20 of the city’s public high school students identified as having been homeless. Between 2009 and 2013, that percentage increased by 73 percent. There are many reasons youth end up on the streets. Most are trying to escape violent homes. http://projects.aljazeera.com/2015/12/homeless-youth/resources.html
  • Swiss Leaks: Murky Cash Sheltered By Bank Secrecy

    “Swiss Leaks: Murky Cash Sheltered By Bank Secrecy” is a penetrating multi-part investigation into the darker side of the world’s second largest bank that prompted questions about the appointment of the United States attorney general, a diplomatic crisis for Switzerland, official inquiries and debate on four continents including a British parliamentary inquiry, and criminal charges and civil lawsuits in multiple countries.
  • Between Borders: American Migrant Crisis

    Each week, hundreds of young people—teenagers and children—attempt to flee the gang warfare that has gripped large swaths of Central America, heading north, crossing thousands of miles in hopes of obtaining asylum or settling with relatives in the United States. From October 2013 through July of this year, nearly 80,000 unaccompanied minors arrived at our southern border. In this powerful documentary for The New York Times, Pulitzer Center grantees Brent and Craig Renaud trace the journey from the violent streets of San Pedro Sula, Honduras through Guatemala and across the Suchiate River aboard flimsy rafts to Mexico. From there, some try to hop “the Beast”—a slow-moving freight train. Others hitchhike or simply make the long trek on foot. No matter the method they choose, the risk of arrest by authorities, abuse by human traffickers or abduction by drug cartels is a constant danger. As the debate on immigration takes center stage in the Republican presidential primary campaign, the Renaud brothers look at the causes and conditions that compel children to stake their lives on this dangerous journey. “Between Borders: American Migrant Crisis” shows us the reality of the so-called “illegals” who seek safe shelter in America. http://www.nytimes.com/video/world/americas/100000003901101/central-america-child-migrants.html http://pulitzercenter.org/education/meet-journalists-renaud-honduras
  • Profiting from Addiction

    Drug addicts and homeless people seeking a way out in New York are instead being referred to unregulated, decrepit “three-quarter” houses, where they are often exposed to unscrupulous operators, some of whom require they attend rehabilitation classes of the operators’ choosing, even if it means relapsing to be able to keep a bed.
  • Strings Attached

    One of Tampa’s largest homeless charities, New Beginnings of Tampa, for years made money off its destitute residents through a legally questionable “work therapy” program. Homeless people -- including the mentally ill and addicted -- were required to work unpaid concessions shifts at professional sporting events and concerts, and in construction, telemarketing, and a bevy of other industries in exchange for shelter. While claiming to provide counseling to the homeless sent to the charity by local law enforcement, hospitals, and the courts, the charity employed no one clinically trained to counsel the mentally ill or addicted, and required residents to sign over food stamps, Social Security checks, and any other income. Many former residents said they worked there for months -- and should have earned more than they owed in rent -- but were never paid.