Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

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  • IRW: The Boy on the Bus

    The Investigative Reporting Workshop found deep cracks in the registry system for sex offenders that allow predators to move, skip registration, and begin new lives under the radar in a new neighborhood — unless they are arrested again. The story was published with IowaWatch.
  • Charity "Scam" Uncovered

    A tip leads Investigative Reporter Hillary Lake to discover the Ohio State Auditor’s office had shut down a charity that funded a “Shop with a Cop” program, but one man was using the charity’s name to continue to collect money. The investigation reveals more than $150,000 was stolen from thousands of victims over several years. Prosecutors were able to shut down the operation after they arrested the man who was collecting money, and say more arrests are likely.
  • Chalkbeat and Bridge: The crisis caused by students changing schools

    A detailed examination of a serious education crises that had been largely unknown in Detroit: Parents repeatedly moving their children from one struggling school to the next in an often-futile quest to find better educational options. In a city where school choice policies encourage school shopping, research shows that 1 in 3 elementary school students changes schools every year. Yet few local leaders or policymakers were aware of the high rates of student churn. Even fewer understood the impact that so much movement has on schools and on the ability of students to succeed. Our five-part series, called “Moving Costs,” set out to change that by telling the stories in a single classroom, where the typical student had cycled through four or more schools on the road to eighth grade. It shed light on the turmoil in classrooms where teachers must routinely scramble to accommodate new students, then see them leave mid-year without saying good-bye.
  • CBS News: New Tax Scam Tricks

    When tax preparer Annette Kraft in Duncan, Oklahoma, checked the status of her clients' tax returns in January, she was surprised to find all of them had been rejected."The code was 902-01," she said. "That means someone else has already filed a tax return." It turns out her clients were victims of a new tax scam intended to cheat them out of their refunds, and her town was ground zero in the scam. The criminals get their hands on returns from previous years, then use that information to file new fraudulent returns on unsuspecting victims. After the refund goes into the victim's bank account, the crooks, posing as debt collectors for the IRS, follow up with a phone call claiming the refund was an error, then directing them to a fraudulent website to return the money. "I had about $9,015 more than I anticipated," said Duncan police officer David Woods. He discovered that supposed refund one day as he checked his bank balance, but it didn't make sense because he hadn't filed his taxes yet. "I didn't get my W-2 to file my taxes," Woods said. He returned the money to the government, but now the IRS says his real refund will be delayed, possibly for months. He's not alone. At the local tire shop, 49-year-old Jerry Duvall told us his $5,800 return is more than two months late. "We planned on taking care of expenses, getting caught up on bills and we counted on it," Duvall said. He missed a $200 car payment, and on the very day we spoke with him, he told us his car was getting repossessed.At least 230 of Kraft's clients have been hit and face months of delays. Taxpayers like 91-year-old Ray Prothro found out about the scam from the IRS while we were there.
  • CBS Evening News, Eye On America: Investigating Their Own

    The CBS Evening News’ Eye on America series investigates how the head of the US Conference of Bishops kept two priests accused of abuse in active ministry. CBS News confronts Archbishop Daniel DiNardo, arguably the most powerful official in the US Catholic Church, about whether he turned a blind eye to abuse in his own archdiocese.
  • Fall From Grace: How Buffalo's Bishop Hid Sexual Abuse in the Catholic Diocese of Buffalo

    Damning documents from a confidential source were the basis for our three-part series on Bishop Richard J. Malone, which showed that Malone returned an accused child abuser to ministry after a previous bishop removed him; allowed another abusive priest to remain pastor of a wealthy parish despite multiple abuse allegations; and deceived the faithful by hiding the "real" abuse list -- containing more than 100 priests -- from the public.
  • Dangerous Jobs, Cheap Meat

    Americans love meat – we have one of the highest rates of consumption in the world. While U.S. shoppers enjoy relatively low prices and an array of choices, there is a high human price tag. The more than 500,000 men and women who work in slaughterhouses and meat processing plants have some of the most dangerous factory jobs in America. The meatpacking industry has made a lot of progress on worker safety since publication of Upton Sinclair’s “The Jungle” in 1906, but some things remain the same: the work is mostly done by immigrants and refugees; they suffer high rates of injuries and even, sometimes death; and the government lags in oversight. http://harvestpublicmedia.org/content/dangerous-jobs-cheap-meat
  • Assault On Justice

    When you hear the charge “assaulting a police officer,” you might assume that an officer has been hurt or injured while serving the community. But in D.C., you might not be able to take so-called APOs at face value. WAMU 88.5 investigative reporter Patrick Madden, along with journalist Christina Davidson, teamed with the Center For Investigative Reporting's Reveal program and American University's Investigative Reporting Workshop to document and analyze nearly 2,000 cases with charges of assaulting a police officer. The results raise concerns about the use or overuse of the charge. Some defense attorneys see troubling indicators in the numbers, alleging that the law is being used as a tactic to cover up police abuse and civil rights violations. The statute “goes too far and criminalizes too much,” one expert says. http://wamu.org/projects/assault-on-justice/
  • True Confessions—Father Edward Fitz-Henry and the Diocese of Monterey

    The Diocese of Monterey for nearly 30 years kept a priest in a position where he could have access to children after promising one mother who says he molested her children in 1990 they would keep him away from children for the rest of his career. In 2011, a then-teenage boy claimed the priest molested him in 2005; the priest remained in that parish even after the mother from the 1990 incidents wrote the bishop a letter asking why the promise had been broken. A former cop hired by the diocese to investigate gave sworn testimony there are likely more victims in the community.
  • Noncompliant Hazardous Waste Facility

    A facility that handles hazardous wastes - including chemicals from auto repair shops, industrial plants and paint stores - before they're moved to permanent disposal sites has operated without a permit because of failures of the city and the company's owners.