Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "slaves" ...

  • CNBC: Oceans of Crime

    This is a crime story, set in the most open and lawless place on earth – the ocean. The perpetrators traffic in an illegal product – seafood. Their front-line workers are literally slaves. And almost anyone who buys salmon, canned tuna, or pet food is helping to fund this outlaw industry, whether they realize it or not. In this documentary about illegal fishing, CNBC illustrates the often shocking, unethical path much of our seafood takes from the water to our dinner plates, and what is being done to curb the often monumental abuses that occur along the way. Because illegal fishing is both a human rights and an environmental issue, CNBC’s goal was to explore the entire supply process and introduce all those involved – fishermen suffering abuse, the perpetrators, the would-be rescuers and enforcers, and the consumers who make it all possible, whether they know it or not.
  • Canada’s Jewish Schindler

    VICE News' reporter Rachel Browne investigates the Liberation of Christian and Yazidi Children of Iraq, which claimed to be using the group's funds to rescue hundreds of Yazidi women and girls who had been captured as slaves by Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria. Browne was the first person to report on their concerns and allegations that he was committing a fraud, and actually using his donation money to pay Yazidi families to say he rescued their family members.
  • Seafood From Slaves

    The Associated Press team uncovered a slave island and relentlessly exposed horrific labor abuses in Thailand's $7 billion annual seafood export industry. During their year-long investigation, Margie Mason, Robin McDowell, Martha Mendoza and Esther Htusan tied seafood caught and processed by trapped workers to the supply chains of almost every major U.S. retailer including Wal-Mart, Kroger, Sysco and Nestle. The reporters used images from space to track down runaway slave ships in Papua New Guinea and dug up loopholes in federal law allowing imports to continue unchecked. When Thailand¹s government said the abuses all occur in foreign territory, the journalists focused on factories just outside its capital, Bangkok where they found children and poor migrants locked inside and forced to peel shrimp. Tapping AP colleagues in all 50 states and eight countries, they documented how those seafood supply chains spread around the world. http://interactives.ap.org/2015/seafood-from-slaves/?START=freedom https://vimeo.com/151181618 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9IeJOnCQlj0&feature=youtu.be https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vgYgAVQG5lk&feature=youtu.be
  • Pimp City: A Journey to the Center of the Sex Slave Trade

    As authorities in the US struggle to keep up with the explosion in sex trafficking, Fusion’s investigative documentary, "Pimp City: A Journey to the Center of the Sex Slave Trade", uncovers a subversive network linking America’s secret neighborhood brothels to a remote Mexican town that traffics more sex slaves to the US, than anywhere else.
  • Mauritania: Slavery's Last Stronghold

    Two CNN Digital reporters traveled to Mauritania -- a West African nation that became the last country in the world to abolish slavery – to document a practice the Mauritanian government denies still exists. Spending nearly a year to gain entry into the country and conducting many of their interviews at night and in covert locations, John Sutter and Edythe McNamee went to great lengths to uncover the tragedy of multigenerational servitude in Mauritania. They met people who’ve never known freedom; people who escaped slavery to find their lives hadn't changed; and abolitionists who have been fighting against slavery for years with minimal results. It was only five years ago -- in 2007 -- that the country finally passed a law that making slavery a crime. So far, only one slave owner has been convicted. The United Nations estimates 10% to 20% of Mauritanians live in slavery today. But the country continues to deny slavery’s existence and attempted to subvert Sutter’s and McNamee’s reporting by assigning to them a government “minder.” Nonetheless, the two succeeded at putting a face on a shocking practice that is similar to slavery in America before the Civil War, in which people are born into slavery and rarely escape. Their report – “Slavery’s Last Stronghold” -- featured a variety of mediums, including personal video accounts and written stories featuring firsthand accounts from freed slaves and one man’s transformative journey from slave owner to abolitionist. It also included related stories – such as the story of escaped Mauritanian slaves now living in Ohio. In response to the initiative, CNN iReport, the network’s global participatory news community, gathered messages of hope and support to be shared at a school for escaped slaves in Nouakchott, Mauritania.
  • Factory Slaves

    The investigation into the plight of migrant workers follows the story of a young girl who left her home in Cambodia on the promise of a good factory job but arrived only to become a debt-bonded slave.
  • Fields of Terror-The New Slave Trade in the Heart of Europe

    People from poor countries are becoming modern day slaves as they are lured in on false pretenses and then being held captive. They were promised “good salaries, accommodations, and food”, but instead were beaten and threatened if they asked for these items. These people were becoming slaves and provided many local restaurants with fresh foods from the surrounding fields. Even though this was all happening, many people were continuing to get away with having these modern day slaves and no one was stopping them.
  • A Crime So Monstrous

    "Skinner digs deep to find slaves, slave traders and slave masters in the frontlines of the third world war zones, in rotting urban ghettos, even in suburban America."
  • Human for sale 'dons' exposed

    "This cross border investigative story unmasked a complex web of human trafficking syndicate operating in the West African sub region where young girls and in some cases children are sold into prostitution in Europe and America. The eight month long investigative scoop finally led to the smashing of the syndicate in a sting operation led by this journalist. 17 girls who were about to be sold were eventually rescued in the operation, with two suspects busted.
  • Sex Slaves in America

    The story is "the culmination of a year long investigation into the underreported epidemic of the forced trafficking of educated foreign women into the United States to work in the growing sex industry of massage parlors, strip clubs and cantinas in major American cities."