Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "storytelling" ...

  • Rocky Mountain PBS / Insight with John Ferrugia: Traded and Trafficked

    Through innovative storytelling and community outreach, “Traded and Trafficked” has sparked constructive conversations in communities across the state of Colorado and inspired citizens in rural and suburban areas to take action against child sex trafficking.
  • NYT: Visual Investigations

    A new form of investigative journalism finds the culprits in death of Khashoggi, slaying of a Gaza medic, gassing of Syrians and killing of Nigerian protesters.
  • NYT: Using FOIA To Open Access to the Government in the Trump Era

    The regulatory and legal system that for the last 50 years has protected the environment in the United States--the air that we breathe, the water we drink, the food we eat, and the toxic chemicals we encounter--is facing an assault unlike anything since the modern environmental movement began in the 1960s. The New York Times in the past year has committed an extraordinary amount of resources not just to investigate the controversies inside the headquarters of the Environmental Protection Agency. But we also have fanned out across the United States to document the real impact this radical shift in regulatory policy is having, via an ambitious investigative project that demanded all of the skills journalism can deliver from FOIAs, to databases, to litigation, to government sources, narrative storytelling and innovative online and print presentations. It is one of the biggest stories of our times. And no one has covered it as aggressively as The New York Times. FOIA, for almost every piece we have published, has been a critical part of our reporting.
  • NYT: Trump's Assault on the Environment

    The regulatory and legal system that for the last 50 years has protected the environment in the United States--the air that we breathe, the water we drink, the food we eat, and the toxic chemicals we encounter--is facing an assault unlike anything since the modern environmental movement began in the 1960s. The New York Times in the past year has committed an extraordinary amount of resources not just to investigate the controversies inside the headquarters of the Environmental Protection Agency. But we also have fanned out across the United States to document the real impact this radical shift in regulatory policy is having, via an ambitious investigative project that demanded all of the skills journalism can deliver from FOIAs, to databases, to litigation, to government sources, narrative storytelling and innovative online and print presentations. It is one of the biggest stories of our times. And no one has covered it as aggressively as The New York Times.
  • NYT: This Is Our Reality Now

    The regulatory and legal system that for the last 50 years has protected the environment in the United States--the air that we breathe, the water we drink, the food we eat, and the toxic chemicals we encounter--is facing an assault unlike anything since the modern environmental movement began in the 1960s. The New York Times in the past year has committed an extraordinary amount of resources not just to investigate the controversies inside the headquarters of the Environmental Protection Agency. But we also have fanned out across the United States to document the real impact this radical shift in regulatory policy is having, via an ambitious investigative project that demanded all of the skills journalism can deliver from FOIAs, to databases, to litigation, to government sources, narrative storytelling and innovative online and print presentations. It is one of the biggest stories of our times. And no one has covered it as aggressively as The New York Times.
  • Bloomberg Businessweek’s 2014 Cyber Attack Reporting

    Over the past decade, hackers have stolen trade secrets, millions of personal identities, and wrought havoc on some of the world’s biggest companies. Some of these actions were orchestrated by lone criminals; some by governments. All of them share one thing in common: The details are never revealed. That changed in 2014 when Bloomberg Businessweek published a trio of deeply reported stories by Michael Riley and Bloomberg colleagues about digital attacks. Each vividly takes readers into the secretive world of hackers and exposes corporate America’s vulnerabilities in startling detail. “The Epic Hack: Target ignored its own alarms – and turned its customers into victims," "How Russian Hackers Stole the NASDAQ” and “Now at the Sands: Iranian Hackers in Every Server” exemplify superlative investigative reporting in a complex field alongside masterful storytelling.
  • Back Home: The Enduring Battles Facing Post-9/11 Veterans

    Since Sept.11, 2001, more than 2.6 million veterans have returned from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to a county largely unprepared to meet their needs and a government that has failed on multiple levels to fulfill the obligations demanded by Congress and promised by both Republican and Democratic administrations. This eight-month investigation documents these failures and others issues in a multimedia platform that includes interactive graphics, video and written storytelling, photographs and a documentary.
  • Money, Power and Transit

    This ongoing inewsource investigation into a public transit system that serves 12 million passengers a year by bus and rail exposed perils to public safety, mismanagement of millions of public dollars and perhaps most egregious: enduring bureaucratic arrogance in the face of public scrutiny. Over the course of a year, inewsource produced more than 30 stories, radio broadcasts, TV features, and interviews. We experimented with new levels of transparency in our reporting and storytelling. We spent thousands of dollars pursuing public information and battling regular retraction demands. The series drew from a multitude of inside sources, leaked documents, hard-fought public records, emails, and other materials to unearth the truth about what’s going wrong inside the San Diego’s North County Transit District. Our stories have drawn intense fire from the district’s legal department — all the while those responsible to the taxpayers and the transit riders have consistently refused to respond to interview requests or to answer specific written questions.
  • Behind the Bloodshed: The Untold Story of America's Mass Killings

    This submission is primarily for the Behind the Bloodshed interactive, which includes data exploration, case files, stories, surprising conclusions and a map of all mass killings from 2006 to the present, told through layered storytelling and data. We have included the more traditional stories published to show - and contrast - with what we believe is a new way to tell a data story. Mass killings are a well-known subject, but do we really know how commonly such violent events occur - especially when they are used to further political agendas? Turns out, though it may be one of the most well-covered types of crimes, we haven't had a clear picture, and neither has the FBI, the agency tasked with tracking them.
  • Back Home: The Enduring Battles Facing Post-9/11 Veterans

    Since Sept.11, 2001, more than 2.6 million veterans have returned from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to a county largely unprepared to meet their needs and a government that has failed on multiple levels to fulfill the obligations demanded by Congress and promised by both Republican and Democratic administrations. This eight-month investigation documents these failures and others issues in a multimedia platform that includes interactive graphics, video and written storytelling, photographs and a documentary.