Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "substances" ...

  • FDA banned food

    The story mainly talks about famous food products that have been barred by US FDA for containing harmful substances being sold in Pakistani market.
  • The Case of Alex Rodriguez

    60 MINUTES' investigation of the details in the doping case of Yankee slugger Alex Rodriguez includes the only interview with Major League Baseball's chief witness against him, the recently indicted Anthony Bosch -- who says he injected Rodriguez with banned substances.
  • The State Where Giving Birth Can Be Criminal

    The piece looked at the effects of a new law in Tennessee that made it a criminal assault to give birth to a baby with drugs in its system. After a six-month investigation involving interviews with pregnant women, doctors, and health workers, we were able to document a consistent pattern of women being driven underground to avoid the fate they’ve seen in mug shots on the local news. Among many narratives: We learned of and/or spoke to women avoiding prenatal care and drug treatment in order to protect themselves from the punitive effects of the law; We learned of and/or spoke to women switching hospitals, avoiding hospital births, and even leaving the state to circumvent the law; We heard about pregnant women seeking drug treatment and being turned away for liability reasons.
  • Synthetic Drugs : The Race Against the Chemists

    Our major finding : We found out that synthetic drugs get through Canadian customs quite easily. Most of them legally. The synopsis of our document is attached with our submission. The story started with a number found in a UN Report that grabbed our attention : 58. It’s the number of new psychoactive substances which entered Canada legally, according to a the 2013 report from the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crimes. We were able to find a synthetic drug dealer who’s doing business on internet. It was our most significant source. Our source and others targeted by our story revealed how it is possible to get drugs into Canada by simply using the postal service.
  • Failures in the Golden State

    The Department of Toxic Substances Control oversees or has some part in regulating everything from nail polish ingredients to oil refineries, radioactive waste to metal recycling in California. At the heart of our series is the story of a department that’s divided, dysfunctional, and ineffective in fulfilling its mission to protect public health and the environment of the Golden State. We sifted through hundreds of pages of reports, memos, reviews, manifests and legal claims. We also analyzed thousands of records in the department’s hazardous waste tracking system to find out that more than 40% of the hazardous waste manifests in the DTSC’s database contain inaccurate information or are missing key details. Our reporting has held leaders accountable at the DTSC and compelled state lawmakers to call for an investigation of the department, including a legislative hearing this month (January 2014). Through a series of public records requests, we found out some of the department’s top leaders were investing in companies the DTSC oversees. Our reporting into the potential financial conflicts of interest prompted an investigation into deputy director Odette Madriago by the California Fair Political Practices Commission (FPPC). Ms. Madriago resigned from her position six weeks after our report aired. The FPPC investigation remains ongoing.
  • Breaking Bad

    The story looked into the federal prosecution of two Houston men who sold analog drugs online – drugs that ultimately killed two teenagers in North Dakota and Minnesota. A third Houston man who had allegedly sold drugs with the defendants was not charged with anything and appears to have cooperated with federal authorities. A main component of the story involved exploring how self-described research chemists are constantly tweaking chemical formulas of substances to circumvent the Federal Analog Act, and how readily available these dangerous drugs are online.
  • As OSHA Emphasizes Safety, Long-Term Health Risks Fester

    For years, Sheri Farley worked in a cushion-making factory. Spray-gun in hand, she stood enveloped in a yellowish fog, breathing glue fumes that ate away at her nerve endings. “Dead foot” set in. She walked with a limp, then a cane, then she didn't walk much at all. “Part of the job,” was the shrugging response from her managers. This article was the first to reveal how the furniture industry used a dangerous chemical called nPB despite urgent warnings from the companies that manufactured it. The story also described egregious behavior by a small cushion-making company in North Carolina called Royale Comfort Seating, where Ms. Farley worked. The piece spotlighted the consequences of OSHA's failure to police long-term health risks and how efforts to control one chemical left workers exposed to something worse. Workplace illnesses like Ms. Farley's affect more than 200,000 Americans per year and cost our economy more than $250 billion annually. The agency responsible for ensuring that Americans can breathe clean air on the job focuses primarily on deadly accidents. But ten times as many people die from inhaling toxic substances at work.
  • A Lethal Dose- The War On Synthetic Drugs

    The Star Tribune broke new ground with its investigation of the shadowy world of synthetic drugs, which quickly emerged as a substantial public health threat in 2011. Though these substances have been touted as "safe and legal," the drugs have provoked unusually violent behavior and deadly consequences.
  • "Tainted Water"

    For more than 20 years, the harmful chemical perchlorate has seeped into San Bernardino County's groundwater. The seep is thought to have started at a local dump site; however, records about the site were lost in the late 1980s by "two state regulatory agencies." The problem wasn't reported again until 1997, but warnings were "dismissed" by the county. The site was "rediscovered" in 2001, but it wasn't until 2009 that the county got serious about stopping the chemical seep. It is estimated that the cleanup operation will be completed by 2013.
  • Toxic Showdown

    Rita Smith's husband Steve won his court case with his former employer Searles Valley Minerals regarding the toxins that killed thousands of migratory birds in a nearby lake.