Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "suffering" ...

  • Best for the children

    We revealed that at least 150 children have been abused in Sweden over the last three years, despite the fact that social services knew about their situation and should have been able to help them. Almost half of the children were children already in care, therefore even more vulnerable, where the social welfare service failed to act to help them, or acted in a way that increased their suffering. There are most probably many more children that have been abused, than the 150 we were able to detect. We were only able to survey the cases known to the Health and Social Care Inspectorate. But in our review we could reveal that 50 municipalities, one in six, have never reported any mistakes on serious misconduct concerning children. This is something that experts interpret as highly unlikely and a serious sign of underreporting.
  • Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism: Countering Concussions

    Our series, "Countering Concussions," revealed that while the University of Wisconsin-Madison is a leader in studying concussions, some former football players are suffering from severe post-concussive symptoms that have prompted them to leave the game — and worry about their futures.
  • ProJo: Suffering in the Shadows: Elder abuse in Rhode Island

    Rhode Island has one of the nation’s highest elderly populations, and a special unit in the state Attorney General’s office dedicated to prosecuting elder abuse. But over 17 years, fewer than half of those charged were convicted of this felony, and only 13 percent served any prison time. The reasons are many, the solutions a challenge -- but there are jurisdictions that do this better.
  • NPR/Frontline: Coal's Deadly Dust

    This NPR/Frontline investigation of an epidemic of a fatal lung disease affecting more than 2,000 coal miners used 30 years of government data and internal agency memos to show that federal agency officials knew more than 20 years ago that coal miners were exposed to toxic silica dust, and were suffering severe lung disease, but did not act then or since to directly address silica exposure in coal mines.
  • CNBC: Oceans of Crime

    This is a crime story, set in the most open and lawless place on earth – the ocean. The perpetrators traffic in an illegal product – seafood. Their front-line workers are literally slaves. And almost anyone who buys salmon, canned tuna, or pet food is helping to fund this outlaw industry, whether they realize it or not. In this documentary about illegal fishing, CNBC illustrates the often shocking, unethical path much of our seafood takes from the water to our dinner plates, and what is being done to curb the often monumental abuses that occur along the way. Because illegal fishing is both a human rights and an environmental issue, CNBC’s goal was to explore the entire supply process and introduce all those involved – fishermen suffering abuse, the perpetrators, the would-be rescuers and enforcers, and the consumers who make it all possible, whether they know it or not.
  • Born to Drugs, Maine’s Most Innocent Victims.

    Nearly 6,000 babies have been born affected by drugs in Maine in the past five years. These innocent victims are caught in a crisis that is marked by suffering and strained hospitals and state resources. In this series of often gut-wrenching stories, Pine Tree Watch examines the challenges within this sad reality.
  • AP: Cops Sell Guns

    After a year’s worth of work, the AP found that law enforcement agencies in Washington state sold about 6,000 guns that had been confiscated during criminal investigations, and more than a dozen of those firearms later became evidence in new investigations. The weapons were used to threaten people, seized at gang hangouts, discovered in drug houses, possessed illegally by convicted felons, found hidden in a stolen car, taken from a man who was suffering a mental health crisis and used by an Army veteran to commit suicide.
  • Coal's Deadly Dust

    This NPR/Frontline investigation of an epidemic of a fatal lung disease affecting more than 2,000 coal miners used 30 years of government data and internal agency memos to show that federal agency officials knew more than 20 years ago that coal miners were exposed to toxic silica dust, and were suffering severe lung disease, but did not act then or since to directly address silica exposure in coal mines.
  • Lasting Scars

    Prisoners waterboarded and tortured by the U.S. suffered enduring wounds — flashbacks, nightmares, depression, headaches — without ever being properly treated.
  • Suffering in Secret

    Illinois steered thousands of its poorest and most vulnerable adults with disabilities into less expensive private group homes and cloaked harm and death with secrecy and silence. The Tribune exposed flawed investigations (two cases were reopened) and revealed how Illinois had publicly undercounted abuse and neglect cases for five years. The Tribune identified 1,311 cases of harm since July 2011 and tracked at least 42 deaths in group homes or their day programs over the last seven years. Additionally, the Tribune uncovered a secretive state practice that allowed group home employees to police their own businesses. The Tribune also detailed a state auction in which group home executives raised hands to select individuals with disabilities to be moved from state facilities into the community. For the first time, the Tribune circumvented state secrecy to show that many group homes were underfunded, understaffed and dangerously unprepared for new arrivals with complex needs.