Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "suffering" ...

  • Born to Drugs, Maine’s Most Innocent Victims.

    Nearly 6,000 babies have been born affected by drugs in Maine in the past five years. These innocent victims are caught in a crisis that is marked by suffering and strained hospitals and state resources. In this series of often gut-wrenching stories, Pine Tree Watch examines the challenges within this sad reality.
  • AP: Cops Sell Guns

    After a year’s worth of work, the AP found that law enforcement agencies in Washington state sold about 6,000 guns that had been confiscated during criminal investigations, and more than a dozen of those firearms later became evidence in new investigations. The weapons were used to threaten people, seized at gang hangouts, discovered in drug houses, possessed illegally by convicted felons, found hidden in a stolen car, taken from a man who was suffering a mental health crisis and used by an Army veteran to commit suicide.
  • Coal's Deadly Dust

    This NPR/Frontline investigation of an epidemic of a fatal lung disease affecting more than 2,000 coal miners used 30 years of government data and internal agency memos to show that federal agency officials knew more than 20 years ago that coal miners were exposed to toxic silica dust, and were suffering severe lung disease, but did not act then or since to directly address silica exposure in coal mines.
  • Lasting Scars

    Prisoners waterboarded and tortured by the U.S. suffered enduring wounds — flashbacks, nightmares, depression, headaches — without ever being properly treated.
  • Suffering in Secret

    Illinois steered thousands of its poorest and most vulnerable adults with disabilities into less expensive private group homes and cloaked harm and death with secrecy and silence. The Tribune exposed flawed investigations (two cases were reopened) and revealed how Illinois had publicly undercounted abuse and neglect cases for five years. The Tribune identified 1,311 cases of harm since July 2011 and tracked at least 42 deaths in group homes or their day programs over the last seven years. Additionally, the Tribune uncovered a secretive state practice that allowed group home employees to police their own businesses. The Tribune also detailed a state auction in which group home executives raised hands to select individuals with disabilities to be moved from state facilities into the community. For the first time, the Tribune circumvented state secrecy to show that many group homes were underfunded, understaffed and dangerously unprepared for new arrivals with complex needs.
  • Driven to death by phone scammers

    It started with a call from Jamaica and ended in a suicide in a Tennessee basement. In between, Albert Poland Jr. had sent tens of thousands of dollars to the man on the phone promising millions. At 81 and suffering from dementia, Poland had fallen victim to a lottery scam that costs thousands of Americans an estimated $300 million annually -- and has turned deadly in both countries.
  • Crumbling Foundations

    NBC Connecticut's Investigative team, the Troubleshooters, exposed a consumer protection failure unlike any other previously reported in Connecticut. Our investigation revealed hundreds of homeowners in the northeast section of our state are suffering incredible emotional and financial distress as they watch the concrete foundations supporting their homes crumble. Insurance companies deny their claims and the only option they have to fix the problem is to replace their foundations. That costs them into the hundreds of thousands of dollars. The Troubleshooters discovered there were warning signs and complaints years ago that got little attention from the state. During the years that have followed, the foundations continued to crack and deteriorate. And all cases we’ve covered appear to have a common connection: the same concrete supply company https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tGULaeR47ZE&feature=youtu.be
  • China in Africa: How Sam Pa became The Middleman

    FT correspondent Tom Burgis in 2014 examined the case of one deal-maker - a mysterious man from Hong Kong known as Sam Pa - to explain and explore the ambitions behind the China-Africa connection. The trail of reporting began in 2009 as Mr. Burgis, then the FT's West Africa correspondent, revealed the details of a deal between an obscure Chinese company named China International Fund and the murderous junta that had seized power in the long-suffering nation of Guinea.
  • A Path to Survival

    This journalism investigation presented by Studio Monitor covers the issue of tuberculosis in Georgia. The number of patients suffering from active forms of tuberculosis in Georgia is growing. Georgia is among the 27 countries with the highest rates of extremely drug-resistant tuberculosis. In our country, only half of the patients suffering this type of tuberculosis are cured. The authorities are late in making important decisions. In the meantime, people are dying. Some patients travel to Europe to save their lives. At the Georgian Center of Tuberculosis, contagious patients are allowed to go home or go out into the streets for a walk. This causes to spread the disease even more. The doctors at the Tuberculosis Center often make mistaken diagnoses. They permit people to enter the treatment program easily, even if the diagnosis of tuberculosis is not certain. 34 percent of multi-drug resistant TB patients in Georgia in 2013 gave up on treatment because of the unbearable side effects. Patients who were released from the Georgian TB program after showing no improvement for two years were cured by doctors after they went to Europe.
  • Veterans Disability Claims

    Yvonne Wenger’s story for The Baltimore Sun examined the disability claims backlog at the Baltimore office of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Through her reporting and use of an online database, she discovered that the Baltimore office, which services all of Maryland, had the worst backlog in the country and made the most mistakes. Servicemen and women in Maryland were waiting an average of 12 months for an initial decision about benefits; in some cases, it could take years more to receive the payments. Yvonne reached out to dozens of veterans but found that all were fearful to speak to a reporter because they thought doing so would affect their claims. She eventually did find a combat veteran, Robert Fearing, who was willing to be interviewed. He was suffering from paranoia and anxiety and had been waiting 2 ½ years for the Baltimore office to make a decision about his claim. After publication of the article, reaction from Maryland’s congressional delegation was swift. Sens. Barbara Mikulski and Ben Cardin both took action to seek changes locally and nationally to address the backlog. And just days after the article was published, Fearing had his claim reviewed and approved.